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Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Lenape | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Oneida | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1926
Type:Text
Extent: 1 reel
Description: Read before the Northampton Historical Society on January 28, 1926, this typescript essay presents the life of a man who was raised by Oneida Indians, missionary and interpreter James Dean (1748-1823) of Westmoreland, New York. It contains a version of the Oneida creation myth. Original in possession of Benjamin D. Meritt, Princeton, N.J.
Collection: A New England pioneer among the Oneida Indians, 1926 (Mss.Film.1101)

A'aninin | Anishinaabe | Apache | Apache, Plains | Apache, Western | Arapaho | Arikara | Assiniboine | Blackfoot | Caddo | Catawba | Cayuga | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Comanche | Creek | Crow | Lenape | Flathead | Haudenosaunee | Ho-Chunk | Hopi | Houma | Iñupiat | Iowa | Isleta | Kaw | Kickapoo | Laguna | Lakota | Mandan | Menominee | Meskwaki | Munsee | Nez Perce | Ojibwe | Omaha | Oneida | Otoe | Odawa | Penobscot | Pawnee | Ponca | Potawatomi | Quapaw | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Shoshone | Stockbridge-Munsee | Tsimshian | Wabanaki | Wichita | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Arapahoe, Chippewa, Eskimo, Gros Ventre, Iroquois, Kansa, Lenape, Muscogee, Niimíipu, Odawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Salish, Sioux, Sac-and-Fox, Sauk-and-Fox, Winnebago, Wyandotte
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1943
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: There are a few items in the Frank G. Speck Papers currently identified as relating to Indian boarding schools.In the collection guide, under Subcollection 1, Series 1, in Section IV, "Southeast," see item IV(15H3), "Yuchi miscellaneous notes," which contains a letter from Ann Rolland (Haskell Institute), to Speck, April 6, 1941, as well as items under "C. Houma (Louisiana)" that relate to mission schools. In Section XIII, "Miscellaneous," see item XIII(22H), "Haskell Institute Roster," which lists of Native students and the Haskell Institute boarding school in 1939-1940, giving name, age, address, and tribe. (The tribes of the students included are listed above in this entry.) In Subcollection I, Series II, Biographical Material, see letters (listed alphabetically by author) from Leona E. Giger and Ann Rolland, both students at Haskell in the early 1940s. Also see letter from "Redge" and Gladys Laulin regarding Chippewa boy returning home for dances. In Series III, Photographs, there is an undated photograph [#10-14(a)] from the Shingwauk Indian Residential School. See also school-related photos in folders "Creek #3," "Eskimo [Inuit] (Labrador) #4," "Houma #1," #2, #7, and #8, "Pamunkey #6," and "Penobscot: People #2." In Series IV, Lantern Slides, there are slides of Native and Black students at the Hampton Institute. More boarding school-related material may be identified in the collection with further research.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Cherokee | Oneida | Onondaga | Cayuga | Seneca | Tuscarora | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Date: 1946-1989
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Cayuga materials in the Lounsbury Papers are located primarily in the "Cayuga" section of Series II, which contains extensive field notes and transcriptions made by both Lounsbury and Michael Foster of Cayuga stories and speeches given by Alexander General, Howard Skye, and Mrs. George Green, along with related discussions. See also Series VII, Audio Recordings, which includes some recordings featuring the Thanksgiving Address and the Condolence ceremony. See also correspondence in Series I, which includes Michael K. Foster's work on Cayuga Midwinter ceremonies, William Sturtevant's work with Oklahoma Seneca-Cayuga, and Marius Barbeau's materials on Cayuga and Tuscarora.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cherokee | Seneca | Oneida
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: circa 1946-1953 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 3 folders
Description: Three items relating to the Cherokee language have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. In Subcollection I, there is relevant correspondence with Floyd Lounsbury (regarding Oneida, Seneca, and Cherokee work) in Series I. Correspondence. In Subcollection II, there is a Cherokee folder in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries IV. Macro-Siouan; and William D. Reyburn's "Cherokee Verb Morphology" (circa 1953) in Series IV. Works by Others.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Haudenosaunee | Mohawk | Seneca | Tuscarora | Onondaga | Oneida | Cayuga
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1984
Type:Text
Extent: 292 pages
Description: This dissertation was submitted to the anthropology department of Brown University by Christina Barbara Johannsen (later Hanks) in 1984. The author was also the founding director (and later on the Board of Directors) of the Schoharie Museum of the Iroquois Indian and a trustee of the Mohawk Caughnawaga Museum. The dissertation is based on fieldwork with Haudenosaunee artists and craftspeople and in museum collections. The author attempted to draw from Haudenosaunee communities through the United States and Canada to show how modern Haudenosaunee art has become "a means of maintaining and expressing a sense of Iroquois identity in a non-Iroquois world," and that the 1970s were in particular a moment of efflorescence as the People of the Longhouse asserted their identity through political activism and art.
Collection: Efflorescence and identity in Iroquois arts (Mss.970.6.J57e)

Oneida | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1974
Contributor: Campisi, Jack
Type:Text
Extent: 520 pages
Description: This dissertation by anthropologist Jack Campisi was submitted to the State University of New York at Albany in 1974. The author organized the dissertation into chapters on methodology; war, trade, and change in Oneida society, 1600 to 1810; culture and history of the Wisconsin Oneidas; contemporary society of the Oneidas of Wisconsin; history and culture of the Oneida of the Thames; conflict and division in Oneida society, 1900-1934; contemporary society of the Oneidas of the Thames; the Oneidas of New York, 1840-present; and a conclusion with various approaches to comparing the ecologies, kinship systems, belief systems, political systems, and intra- and inter-tribal relations of the three communities as Campisi seeks to assess the evolving identities and ability to perform "boundary maintence" of each Oneida community. Campisi was a recipient of an APS Phillips Fund grant, and donated this item to the Society.
Collection: Ethnic identity and boundary maintenance in three Oneida communities (Mss.970.3.C15e)

Haudenosaunee | Oneida | Seneca
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1939
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The Haudenosaunee materials in the Hallowell papers are located in Series V. There are postcards of museum exhibits featuring Iroquois culture in the "American Indian" series of folders. The rest of the materials are concentrated in the folder labled "Eastern Woodlands." These items include information on material culture, the social organization of the confederacy, a chart of relational systems of clans, kinship, and genealogy. Specific topics includ Huron Mythology, Oneida magic, Seneca secret societies and genealogy. Some of this material is culturally sensitive.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Haudenosaunee | Oneida | Onondaga | Seneca | Mohawk | Tuscarora | Nottoway
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Onkwehón:we
Language(s): English
Date: 1816-1820
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 6 items
Description: Items relating to Haudenosaunee materials, mostly the correspondence of Peter S. du Ponceau as he sought to obtain linguistic materials. This includes an exchange with Jason Chamberlain, who was referred to du Ponceau by Thomas Jefferson, mentioning an "Indian spelling book" [Gaiatonsera (1813)] and Eleazer Williams; a letter to Williams listing Iroquois works at the American Philosophical Society and requesting "more data"; a letter to Joseph P. Norris asking for records pertaining to the conference between Scaroyady of the Six Nations and some members of the Society of Friends [for reply, see also Norris to Du Ponceau, June 19, 1818]; a letter to Jefferson forwarding comparative Iroquoian vocabularies (Oneida, Onondaga, Seneca, Mohawk, Tuscarora with Nottoway); and a memorandum by du Ponceau concerning H. G. Spofford's (of Albany) directions to contact Eleazer Williams (Oneida Castle, Oneida New York) for Indian vocabularies.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Haudenosaunee | Tuscarora | Seneca | Cayuga | Mohawk | Oneida | Onondaga
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1668-1990, bulk circa 1936-1974
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history, among other interests. Haudenosaunee materials include items relating to Wallace's particular interests in the Tuscarora and the Seneca, and can be difficult to disentangle from items organized by subject, such as personality, religion, and cultural revitalization. Researchers should therefore also see the Wallace Papers entries for the Tuscarora and Seneca, and consult the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's career and for an itemized list of the collection's contents. Materials explicitly linked to the Haudenosaunee can be found throughout Series I. Correspondence, especially in the correspondence with William N. Fenton, Merle H. Deardorff, Francis Jennings, Mina Brayley Smith, and Wallace's father, historian Paul A. W. Wallace. Other relevant correspondence files include those for Aren Akweks (Ray Fadden), the American Philosophical Society, Michael Ames, Edmund Snow Carpenter, Dwight Lewis, Chamberlain, Malcolm Collier, Charles Congdon, Jesse Cornplanter, Robert T. Coulter, Myrtle Crouse, Norma Cuthbert, Hazel Dean-John, Vine Deloria, Michael K. Foster, John F. Freeman, Joseph Chamberlain Furnas, Bob Gabor, Charles Garrad, C. Marshall Gorman, Randy Gorske, Barbara Graymont, Jeannette Henry, N. Perry Jemison, Francis Jennings, Randy Alan John, Gertrude Kurath, Weston La Barre, David Landry, Gardiner Lindzey, Floyd G. Lounsbury, Franklin O. Loveland, Charles Lucy, Nancy Lurie, Benjamin Malzberg, Henry Manley, Jane Ann McGettrick, Ernest Miller, Stephen Murray, Oscar Nephew, New York State Library, Niagara County Historical Society, Arthur Caswell Parker, Arthur Piepkorn, Richard Pilant, Susan Postal, V. R. Potmis, Frederic Pryor, Martha Randle, Paul G. Reilly, Egon Renner, Alex and Catherine H. Ricciardelli, Cara Richards, Sally M. Rogow, Anne Marie Shimony, John Sikes, Florence Smith, Mrs. Douglas Snook, Patricia Snyder-Freeman, Frank Speck, George Dearborn Spindler, William Sturtevant, Elizabeth Tooker, Eula Tottingham, Allen W. Trelease, University of Pennsylvania Press, Shirley Vanatta, A. Jeanne Weissinger, C. A. Weslager, and Susan Williams. There is also a great deal on Haudenosaunee peoples in Series II. Research Notes and Drafts, particularly relating to Wallace's monographs on the Tuscarora and Seneca. Subseries A. Indian Research primarily contains Haudenosaunee-related materials, including notes and field notes from research trips to Iroquoia and to archives, copies of and extracts from primary and secondary sources, notes on what Wallace called his "Iroquois Research Project," field notes and materials compiled by Paul A. W. Wallace, etc. There is also some Haudenosaunee material in Subseries B. Revitalization and Culture, mostly in form of secondary sources, including "History of the St. Regis Reservation and several Iroquois pamphlets and drawings" by Mohawk Aren Akweks (aka). Series III. Notecards contains index cards with notes on primary and secondary sources on a range of topics, including Wallace's research interests in revitalization, culture and personality, and his work on Indian land claims, all of which touch on the Haudenosaunee. Several drafts of Wallace's work on the Haudenosaunee and other indigenous peoples can be found in Series IV. Works by Wallace A. Professional, along with fictional works in B. Creative Writing and C. Juvenilia of the same series. Series VI. Consulting and Committee Work A. American Anthropological Association contains two folders labeled "Iroquois Wampum," which contain materials relating to Onondaga demands for the return of wampum belts held by the New York State Museum. Wallace publicly supported the Haudenosaunee, in direct opposition to many scholars, including his friend William Fenton, who argued that the NYSM had saved and maintained the belts and should continue in that role. Correspondence, drafts of Wallace's statement, and other items reveal many factors at play: Vine Deloria, Jr.'s involvement; Haudenosaunee youth involved in the red power movement; inter-tribal divisions about the fate of the belts; scholarly disagreement about how best to serve both Native and non-Native members of the public; ideas about the roles of museums in preserving and protecting cultural materials; anxieties about the implications of Wallace's stance for ethnological museum collections in general; the legal dimensions of deaccessioning bequests; and more. [See Wallace's correspondence with Fenton and others in Series I. Correspondence for more on this issue.] Subseries C. Other Committees of the same series includes files on the Iroquois Conference 1946-1961. Series IX. Indian Claims contains over 50 folders of research materials, dockets, trial memoranda, etc., relating to Wallace's work as an expert witness for Haudenosaunee land claims. Series XI. Maps also contains materials pertaining to Haudenosaunee land claims, as well as to Wallace's personal research. Finally, Series XII. Graphics includes watercolor paintings by Ray Fadden's (Mohawk, aka Aren Akweks) son John (Mohawk, aka Ka-Hon-Hes), original drawings by Seneca Jesse Cornplanter and Tuscarora Nellie Gansworth, and photographs associated with Paul A.W. Wallace's fieldwork among the Indians of Pennsylvania, New York State, and Ontario as well as Anthony F.C. Wallace's research (1947-1985) on American Indians including several photographs of Tuscaroras, Senecas, a cradleboard, and pictographs. Additional material may be found in other places in the collections.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)