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Chowanoke | Tuscarora | Tutelo | Shawnee
Language(s): English
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Genre: Notes
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The Chowan materials in the Frank G. Speck Papers consist of one folder labeled III(7B5c), "Tuscarora -- c. Reading notes on the Chowan (incorporated by Tuscarora)." It consists of one page of reading notes on the Chowans, taken from the North Carolina Colonial Records, regarding encroachments of colonists, incorporation by Tuscaroras in 1733, land sale in 1735. Two pages of reading notes on the Mattamuskeet Indians, 1713-1728, from same source, particularly relating to Tuscarora War and mentioning Coree Indians as well. Three notecards labelled "Tutelo" (taken from General John S. Clark), "Suwanoos" (Shawnees, also taken from Clark), and "Nessoneicks" (taken from Bland, Discovery of New Brittaine).
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Haudenosaunee | Lenape | Catawba | Cherokee | Houma | Nanticoke | Abenaki | Cayuga | Tutelo | Onondaga | Mohawk | Tuscarora
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1777-1950, bulk 1914-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 23 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Haudenosaunee history, language, and culture. Includes correspondence with Haudenosaunee consultants like John L. Buck, Seth Newhouse, Josiah Hill, David S. Hill, etc., on topics ranging from the seizure of wampum by the Canadian government, Newhouse's request that Speck secure wampum for him, Newhouse's offer to sell Speck his history manuscript, which he has been working on since 1885 [#1650], Haudenosaunee burial customs, religion, etc.; an essay by Jesse Moses titled "The Long-House man, a Six Nations Indian of Canada speaks his mind," about the relationship of Christianity and the long-house religion; Speck's correspondence with William N. Fenton, principally concerning field work among the Catawba, Cherokee, and Houma but also touching on Fenton's Seneca field work, Speck's various studies of the Haudenosaunee, and the Second Conference on Iroquois Research; correspondence with other anthropologists about various aspects of Haudenosaunee history and culture such as material culture specimens, archaeology, historical sources, agriculture, education, warfare, religion, population statistics, etc.; a draft of Speck's "Reflections on Iroquois religion" and related correspondence; an undated document describing a meeting of Delaware, Nanticoke, and Canadian Iroquois in the presence of Speck and recounting the injustices suffered by Indians in United States and Canada; a copy of a 1777 treaty made by Peter F. Timothy, a Moravian Delaware, in August 1888, and transmitted to Speck by Jesse Moses; and Speck's research notes and other miscellaneous correspondence on topics such as masks, art, museum specimens, hunting territory, chiefships, words, warfare with the Abenaki, the Delaware-as-women theme, academic publications and conferences, etc.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Haudenosaunee | Onondaga | Mohawk | Tuscarora | Oneida | Cayuga | Seneca | Lenape
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1940
Extent: 16 panels (oversized)
Description: Designer and author Ray Fadden (Aren Akweks, Tehanetorens) was a member of the Wolf Clan of the Mohawk community of Akwesasne and founder of the Six Nations Indian Museum of Onchiota, New York. As an educator, Fadden created “educational charts” to convey elements of Haudenosaunee history and culture to audiences. Early on, he enlisted the help of his son, John Fadden. Later, others were brought in to create other charts. This particular chart or poster is signed by Sagotaoala (Bob Gabor). It is comprised of four parts (photocopies of the original). Seen as a whole, the central feature of the poster is a map of Haudenosaunee territory in present-day New York State, showing the relative locations of the six nations of the Iroquois League (Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, Mohawk, and Tuscarora) and overlaid with drawings relating to Haudenosaunee history and culture. This central image is ringed with many more sketches, and around the edges the chart is bordered wtih different wampum belt designs. The sketches range from small and simple to fairly large and elaborate, and feature important people, events, places, material culture items, etc. from Haudenosaunee history and culture. This includes drawings of people like Hiawatha, Joseph Brant, Mary Jemison, etc.; material culture items like a water drum, body armor, pottery, etc.; scenes from daily life such as hunting, playing lacrosse, and a medicine man harvesting tobacco, etc.; more specific events like councils, warfare, a Dutch massacre of Delaware neighbors, and the arrival of the Tuscarora; and more recent happenings like Akwesasne Club Members on an outing and the role of Indian steel-workers in the construction of the "Rainbow Bridge" acress the Niagara River. Along with the 4-panel complete educational poster, there are 2 panels with miscellanous drawings along the edges, less polished and less specific than in the completed version, and 2 panels that together comprise a map of New York State and environs, and have the same kinds of drawings as the other two posters (albeit less polished than the 4-panel poster but more polished than in the other 2-panel item). Included in this folder are negatives of each of the 8 panels described.
Collection: Iroquois past and present in the state of New York, presented by the Akwesasne Mohawk counselor organization (Mss.970.3.F12i)

Haudenosaunee | Seneca | Tuscarora | Mohawk
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1940
Type:Text
Extent: 1 reel
Description: "Letters and documents relating to the government service of Jasper Parrish among the Indians of New York State," compiled and edited by Mrs. Dorothy May Fairbanks Newton, 1940. This Vassar College student thesis contains text written by Newton, transcriptions of letters to and from Parrish [aka Parish, an Indian agent and interpreter] and other documents, and 54 letters and 5 maps pertaining to Indian affairs in New York State. Newton used primary documents found in Vassar College's Jasper Parrish Papers Collection. Originals of both thesis and the primary documents it is based on are at Vassar College.
Collection: Letters and documents relating to the government service of Jasper Parrish among the Indians of New York state, 1790-1831 (Mss.Film.650)

Haudenosaunee | Oneida | Onondaga | Seneca | Cayuga | Tuscarora | Susquehannock | Shawnee | Nanticoke
Alternate forms: Conestoga, Iroquois, Six Nations
Language(s): English
Date: 1700-1757; ca 1815
Type:Text
Extent: 40 items
Description: Correspondence and other materials regarding Pennsylvania Indian affairs. Topics include Pennsylvania's relations with Native peoples; hostilities between Native groups and colonists in the backcountry; diplomatic overtures and councils between Native and colonial leaders; the fur trade; land claims and disputes; legal and illegal surveying of Indian lands; the Lancaster Treaty of 1744; copper mine opened by Governor Keith; anxieties about French influence over Indians and conflict with French over fur trade; role of gifts and payments for Indians; Indian roads; Virginians' desires to expand west; Native religious beliefs and morality; Count Zinzendorf's mission; the imprisonment and escape of Thomas McKee. Other individuals mentioned include Peter Bizaillon, Letitia Penn. Caxagan, Edward Shippen.
Collection: Selections from the correspondence of the Honourable James Logan, 1699-1750 (Mss.B.L82)

Haudenosaunee | Tuscarora
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Tuscarora
Date: 1948-1949
Extent: 30 open reel tapes (14 hr., 38 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Recorded by Anthony Wallace in 1948 and 1949 at the Tuscarora Reservation in Niagara County, New York. Contains folkloric stories, tribal histories (especially relating to the 18th and 19th centuries), autobiographical stories, reminiscences, Vocabularies, and descriptions of tribal government, organizations, and customs. Almost all stories are given in both Tuscarora and English. Originally recorded on 16 wire spools, transfered to open reel tape in 1950. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Tuscarora material (Mss.Rec.2)

Tuscarora
Alternate forms: Haudenosaunee, Skarù:ręˀ, Six Nations
Language(s): English | Tuscarora
Date: 1948-1949
Type:Text
Extent: 176 pages
Description: The Tuscarora materials in the ACLS collection consist mainly of two items in the "Tuscarora" section of the finding aid. Anthony Wallace's "Notes to accompany Tuscarora recordings" accompany Mss.Rec.2, listed separately in this guide. These notes include some transcriptions and summaries of texts of recorde. Topics includes anecdotes, politics, genealogy and kinship terms, disease and magic, autobiographical stories, color perception, history and legend, and a reading of the Jefferson vocabulary. William Reyburn's "Tuscarora texts and Vocabularies" corresponds to Mss.Rec.9, listed separately in this guide. It includes interviews transcribed from recordings, and texts (including several versions of Crossing the Ice) with translations and Vocabularies. In the "Iroquois" section, some information on Tuscarora speakers and language are found in Hickerson's "Material on Iroquois dialects," a study of Iroquoian languages.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Tuscarora | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: July 13, 1713
Type:Text
Extent: 1 page
Description: Letter to Henry, Lord Bishop of London, from original in the Linnean Society of London, regarding Indian war and peace with Tuscaroras.
Collection: Peter Collinson papers (Mss.Film.629)

Inuit | Unangan | Tlingit | Muckleshoot | Nez Perce | Creek | Dakota | Lenape | Haudenosaunee | Iowa | Kickapoo | Meskwaki | Miami | Muckleshoot | Otoe | Pawnee | Shawnee | Wyandot | Tuscarora | Seneca | Onondaga | Oneida | Mohawk | Cayuga
Alternate forms: Eskimo, Aleut, Unangas, Sioux, Lenape, Iroquois, Fox, Sac and Fox, Sauk, Huron
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1937-1999
Description: This entry covers materials not otherwise covered by other entries relating to the Anthony Wallace Papers. Researchers are advised to see also the other entries devoted to specific cultural groups, Of particular interest will be Series II. Research Notes and Drafts, particularly Subseries A. Indian Research, which contains correspondence, notes and drafts from Wallace's research among the Seneca and Tuscarora. Some overlapping Native American material is in Subseries B. Revitalization and Culture. Also of particular interest will be Series IX. Indian Claims, which contains Wallace's work (with his research assistant Michal Lowenfels Kane) as an expert witness for several Native American land claims, including those of Creek, Dakota (Sioux), Delaware, Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), Iowa, Kickapoo, Meskwaki (Fox, Sac and Fox, or Sauk and Fox), Miami, Muckleshoot, Oto-Missouri, Pawnee, Shawnee, and Wyandot peoples. Another concentration of materials can be found in Series VII. Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute and pertain to Wallace's study of "arctic hysteria" (piblokto) among Greenland Inuit. Subseries B. U.S.-Soviet Commission on Anthropology of Series VI. Consulting and Committee Work also contains items on arctic populations. Materials related to Wallace's research on Native American and Indigenous topics can also be throughout Series I. Correspondence (several of Wallace's correspondents were anthropologists, historians, Native individuals, and other interested parties), Series III. Notecards, Series IV. Works by Wallace, Series V. Works by Others, Series VI. Consulting and Committee Work, Series VIII. University of Pennsylvania (to a lesser extent), Series XI. Maps, and Series XII. Graphics. Relevant correspondence files include those of the American Philosophical Society, James Axtell, Molly Nelson Archambaud (Molly Spotted Elk, Penobscot) Whitfield Bell, Robert F. Berkhofer, Carl Bridenbaugh, Edward C. Carter, Raymond Fogelson, Robert Grumet, Jeannette Henry, Stephen N. Kane, George F. Kearney, David H. Kelley, Nancy Lurie, J. T. S. McCabe, D'Arcy McNickle, Chief C. O. Nelson, Stanley Pargellis, Robert Prall, John E. Roth, Claude E. Schaefer, Donald Smith, John Tabor, Norman Tait, Morton I. Teicher, Ronald Thomas, and Katharine Young. The graphics series is also significant, containing images of pictographs, watercolor paintings by Ray Fadden's (Mohawk, aka Aren Akweks) son John (Mohawk, aka Ka-Hon-Hes), original drawings by Seneca Jesse Cornplanter and Tuscarora Nellie Gansworth, and photographs associated with Paul A.W. Wallace's fieldwork among the Indians of Pennsylvania, New York State, and Ontario as well as Anthony F.C. Wallace's research (1947-1985) on American Indians. Specific items not mentioned elsewhere include a folder on "Muckleshoot Tribe vs. the United States, Docket No. 98" and "Tee-Hit-Ton Indians vs. the United States" [the Tee-Hit-Ton are Tlingit] in Series IX. Indian Claims; a folder containing Frank Speck material on the Nanticoke in Series IV. Works by Wallace A. Professional; and a paper on the Nez Perce in Subseries 5. Student Seminar Papers of Series II. Research Notes and Drafts D. Rockdale.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Powhatan | Chickahominy | Rappahannock | Cherokee | Penobscot | Seminole | Tuscarora
Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1947
Extent: 40 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's interest in the various Virginia- or Chesapeake-area peoples sometimes collectively lumped as Powhatans, including the Chickahominy, Mattaponi, Nansemond, Pamunkey, and Rappahannock peoples, from the early contact period into the mid-twentieth century. The Cherokees, Seminoles, Tuscaroras, and Penobscots are also mentioned. Correspondence includes Speck's correspondence with Chickahominy consultants like Chief George L. Nelson, Mrs. S. P. Nelson, Chief James H. Nelson, and E. P. Bradby; Pamunkey consultants like Paul L. Miles and Chief O. W. Adkins; Charles Edgar Gilliam, a Petersburg, Virginia, attorney and amateur historian, etymologist, and ethnologist; and a letter from Werner Müller in Berlin to the University of Pennsylvania inquiring whether Speck's book on the Nansamond and Chickahominy Indians was published and mentioniong Speck's publications on the Rappahannock and Powhatan. Other materials, largely arranged by topic, were compiled by Speck as well as by some his students, particularly those who participated in a field research group between 1939 and 1942, such as Mary Rowell Carse, Edmund Carpenter, Royal Hassrick, John "Jack" Kremens, Maurice A. Mook, Robert Solenberger, and Theodore Stern. Of particular interest might be a folder of 1941-1946 correspondence (42 letters) and copies of various documents relating to the efforts of Speck, James R. Coates, and others to overcome the practice of Virginia draft boards to classify indigenous peoples as "Negroes" for Selective Service. Other materials include a folder on Chickahominy efforts to gain recognition, including chartering the tribe as an incorporation; two of Speck's field notebooks on the Pamunkey, Mattaponi, Rappahannock, Cherokee, and Chickahominy; Speck's reading notes on topics like gourds and the bow and arrow in early contact days; a description of "Pamunkey Town" in 1759, based on Andrew Burnaby, Travels (1760); a 1940 newspaper article titled "Virginia Indians Past and Present"; notes on Virginia Indian populations in 1668, based on figures obtained from a regulation requiring certain numbers of wolves be killed by various Indian groups; Charles Edgar Gilliam's "Historical sketch of Appomatoc Indians, 1607-1723"; and Gilliam on Powhatan Algonquian birds, etc., in colonial times. Other folders are devoted to topics such as Pamunkey hunting and fishing, Pamunkey games and amusements, Pamunkey celestial and meteorological phenomena, Pamunkey contemporary technology, Pamunkey emergency foods, Pamunkey fish, amphibians, shellfish, and reptiles, Pamunkey reptiles, Pamunkey animals, Pamunkey birds, Pamunkey mensuration, Pamunkey miscellaneous notes and correspondence, Pamunkey social organization, Pamunkey pottery, Pamunkey plants and agriculture, Pamunkey foods, Pamunkey medicines and poisons, Pamunkey folklore and language, Rappahannock field notes, Rappahannock contemporary technology, Rappahanock taking devices, Rappahannock miscellaneous notes and correspondence, Mattaponi miscellaneous notes and correspondence, Chickahominy miscellaneous notes and correspondence, field notes on Western Chickahominy, Nansemond miscellaneous notes and correspondence, and miscellaneous notes and correspondence on Virgina Indians.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)