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Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Maliseet | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki | Atikamekw
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Tete de Boule
Date: 1914-1930
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Hallowell Papers are mostly located in Series V, Research Files, in folders labled "Abenaki" and Series VI, Photographs, Subseries E "St. Francis Abenaki Album." These include linguistic, ethnographic, ethnobotanical, ceremonial knowledge, information on political organization, and historical materials. Of particular interest are a sketch of Abenaki history from 1600-1930 accompanied by detailed notes from secondary sources on 17th century Abenaki history. The linguistic materials include an analysis of how the language changed after contact with Catholic missionaries, Abenaki vocabulary related to body parts, Abenaki phonetics, and religious, medical, and kinship terminology. The ethnobotanical materials include a manuscript labled "Identity of animals and plants," and information concerning herbal medicine and its practitioners. There is a wealth of ethnographic materials that include drawings of pipes, descriptions of games, baketry and birch bark maks. There is descriptions of Abenaki music and diagrams of dances, as well as detailed descriptions of hunting techniques. Some of the genealogical materials contains lists of community members names and descriptions of marriage. Interspered throughout the folders labled "Abenaki" in the Research Files are interlinear translations of stories such as "Man who could Find Lost Objects," "Woman and Bear Lover" and numerous other stories. The materials on hunting include topics such as the use of snow shoes, preparation of moose hide,and techniques and drawings of trapping. The collections contain important information designation hunting territories and family names. Four folders contain detailed informaiton on kinship terms. Two folders on Measurements and Genealogical data contain lists of names. The folders labled "Linguistics" in Series V contain scattered information about Abenaki grammar. In Series VI, of 160 photographs taken at St. Francis, Odanak in the Centre-du-Québec region. The Abenaki people in the photographs are identified, in most cases, and also include depictions of traditional dress, buildings, clothing, baskets, and a wide variety of material culture. The correspondence, in Series I, includes letters from Theophile Panadis; Gordon Day describing his collection of stories, recordings, vocabularies, and hunting territories. Henry Lorne Masta, one of Hallowell's Abenaki consultants, writes about culture and language. Additional correspondents may contain other Abenaki-related information.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Innu | Naskapi | Atikamekw | Wabanaki | Lenape | Algonquin | Mashpee | Passamaquoddy | Wampanoag | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot | Maliseet | Muscogee | Menominee
Alternate forms: Menomini, Têtes-de-Boules, Têtes de Boules, Tete de Boule
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1920-1940
Description: The materials from Algonquian speaking cultures is quite extensive, though scattered, in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers. One of the strengths is Hallowell's very fine black and white portraits of indigenous peoples located in Series VI, Subseries F, which includes images of Mashpee, Mohegan, Montagnais, Naskapi, Womponowag, Nipissing, Atikamekw, Series V contains some generalized materials such "Algoquian Cross Cousin Marriage," Speck's studies of northern Algoquian hunting territories, and Algonquin mythology and history. The folders entitled "Eastern Woodlands" in box 26 contain more culturally specific materials such as a Penobscot vocabulary list, Innu and Naswkapi material culture, and Delaware religions and ceremonies, although many of these are quite brief. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a letter from John Swanton discussing bear ceremonialism in Muscogee culture. George Herzog's correspondence includes Penobscot and Maliseet scores of war dance songs. There is also a letter from Jeffrey Zelitch, dated 1969, describing traditional ceremonies on the Lakota Rosebud reservation just before the American Indian Movement begins. George Spindler's lettter to describes a Medicine Lodge ceremony among the Menomini.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Arapaho
Alternate forms: Arapahoe
Language(s): Arapaho | English
Date: 1949-1952, 1962, 1967-1968, 1973-1974, 1976-1977, 1992, 1995-1996, 2000-2001
Type:Text
Extent: 814 pages
Description: The Arapaho materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 7 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Andrew Cowell, Orin T. Hatton, William Lewis Merrill, Willam K. Powers, Sue Roark-Calnek, Z. Salzmann, and William Weigel. These materials pertain to both Northern and Southern Arapaho. The materials by Cowell and Weigel relate to linguistic fieldwork for which there are accompnaying audio recordings, listed separately in this guide. Salzmann's material is also linguistic, containing a draft grammar of the language. The material by Hatton also relates to an extensive audio collection, "Ghost Dance-Era Songs of the Arapaho Crow Dance," also listed separately in this guide.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Manche Ch'ol | Maya
Alternate forms: Cholti
Language(s): Ch'olti' | Spanish
Date: 1695
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume, 282 pages
Description: This is a copy of Morán's "libro grande" (1625-1650), and includes two versions of the grammar (in different hands), confessional materials, and a vocabulary of 500 words which has been added to the others. The first three pages are a narrative of Spanish missions (1689-1692) by Thomas Murillo. Donor, Academia de Ciencias de Guatemala, through Mariano Gálvez, 1836.
Collection: Mayan Language Texts, 1553-1727 (Mss.497.43.V42)

Aymara | Quechua
Language(s): English | Aymara | Spanish
Date: 1950-1972
Description: The Aymara materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist of comparative linguistics and studies of kinship in Series II. Of particular interest are the audio recordings in Series VII on the folklore of the Ayar Incas. The correspondence, in Series I, contains information of the geographic distribution of the language, Lounsbury's analysis of the language and its relationship to Quechua, Christian scriptures in Aymara, Morris Swadesh's work on genetic classification of Native American languages, and geographic distribution of Aymara population.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Inuit | Inuvialuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Date: 1968
Extent: 11 sound tape reels (2 hr., 4 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Field recordings of Inuit languages recorded in 1968 in Eskimo Point, Baker Lake, Coppermine, Cambridge Bay, Baffin Island, and Rankin Inlet. The language consultants include Tom Kalanyek (Inuvik), Edward Felix (Tuktoyaktuk), Naomi Niptnatiak (Kugluktuk), Doris Kekpak (Cambridge Bay), Thomas Angutitchauk (Gjoa Haven), Jimmy Gibbons (Repulse Bay, resident of Arviat), Hugh Ungunga (also named Tapatai?) (Baker Lake), Phillip Sheetoga (Rankin Inlet), David Uvingayak and Thomas Katlak (Arviat), Rebecca Kitsualik (Pond Inlet, resident of Gjoa Haven), Martha Adams (Kuujjuaq, resident of Rankin Inlet).  (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Canadian Eskimo Dialects (Mss.Rec.74)

Catawba | Cherokee | Tutelo
Language(s): English | Catawba | Tutelo
Date: 1716; 1803; 1951-1997
Extent: 7 boxes
Description: The Catawba materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are primarily concentrated in Series II. These consist of copies of secondary sources such as an "Indian Vocabulary from Fort Christanna, 1716, Catawba census notes, 1830-1929, land claim agreements, and a dictionary of Place names in South Carolina. Original materials include hundreds of pages of Siebert's FIeld notes and a Catawba vocabulary / dictionary done with Wes Taukchiray.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Cherokee | Oneida | Onondaga | Cayuga | Seneca | Tuscarora | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Date: 1946-1989
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Cayuga materials in the Lounsbury Papers are located primarily in the "Cayuga" section of Series II, which contains extensive field notes and transcriptions made by both Lounsbury and Michael Foster of Cayuga stories and speeches given by Alexander General, Howard Skye, and Mrs. George Green, along with related discussions. See also Series VII, Audio Recordings, which includes some recordings featuring the Thanksgiving Address and the Condolence ceremony. See also correspondence in Series I, which includes Michael K. Foster's work on Cayuga Midwinter ceremonies, William Sturtevant's work with Oklahoma Seneca-Cayuga, and Marius Barbeau's materials on Cayuga and Tuscarora.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cayuga | Tuscarora | Mohawk | Onondaga | Seneca | Haudenosaunee | Lenape | Nanticoke
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Cayuga
Date: 1914-1947
Type:Text
Extent: 10 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Cayuga history, language, and culture. This includes Speck's correspondence with indigenous consultants such as Deskaheh and Alexander General (who became known as Deskaheh after the other's death in 1925) on topics such as museum specimens, games, religion, politics, land claims, stories, etc.; correspondence with other anthropologists such as Ernest Dodge about Cayuga war medicine [see also Speck and Dodge (1945)] and William N. Fenton concerning Cayuga winter rituals and suggestions for Speck's Cayuga manuscripts [see also Speck (1945b)]; and a notebook of Cayuga material containing ethnographic data and mentioning consultants John L. Buck, Mrs. John L. Buck, and Jerry Aaron as well as Deskaheh.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1828-1905; 1939-1975
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Lounsbury Papers is found primarily in several sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with a number of people on Cherokee language and culture. These correspondents include Harry Basehart, William Cook, William Fenton, John D. Gillespie, Mary Haas, Jack Kilpatrick, John Witthoft. In Series II, see the "Cherokee" section, which contains 3 boxes of research materials, including Lounsbury's field notes with numerous Cherokee speakers in Oklahoma, copies of original notes by other linguists, language instruction materials, and other related documents. The "General Iroquois" section contains some comparative materials as well, as may other sections to smaller degrees. Series VI contains multiple boxes of card files with Cherokee language data in the form of lexicons and texts in translation. In Series VII, there are several audio recordings, including a reading of Private John G. Burnett's eyewitness account of Cherokee removal, 1838-1839, and a significant number of recordings of songs and dances made by Will West Long and Della Owl, and Cherokee lessons by Robert Bushyhead and William Cook.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)