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Otomi | Chitimacha | Atakapa | Cherokee | Osage | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Nottoway | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | Nanticoke | A'aninin | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Seminole | Quapaw | Yuchi | Lenape | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Seneca | Mohawk | Onondaga | Cayuga | Oneida | Tuscarora | Natchez | Wyandot | Creek | Mohican | Mohegan
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Huron-Wyandot, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Lenape
Date: 1798-1821
Type:Text
Extent: 219 pages
Description: This volume contains extracts of Benjamin Smith Barton's "New Views of the Origin of the Tribes and Nations of America" (Philadelphia, 1797), with additions by Peter S. Du Ponceau. The bulk of the volume is comprised of word list of 54 words with equivalents listed in a range of 50-70 languages. While Barton listed no authority, Du Ponceau cited sources. Languages with words listed include Chitimacha, Atakapa, Cherokee, Osage, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Nottoway, Kansa, Omaha, Dakota, Pawnee, Nanticoke, Gros Ventres, Miami, Mi'kmaq, Seminole, Quapaw, Yuchi, Delaware, Ojibwe, Shawnee, Seneca, Mohawk, Onondaga, Cayuga, Oneida, Tuscarora, Natches, Wyandot, Creek, Mahican, Mohegan, and many others. The word list includes the terms for God, heaven, and sky, as well as various terms relating to kinship, parts of the body, weather, and more. The volume also includes notes on sounds of the Otomi (Othomi) observations on declension; observations about the Omaha, Kansa, Oto, Arkansas, and Missouri languages; and notes on symbol and sound. Also includes a newspaper clipping of a review (in German) of Barton's "New Views" that appeared in "Göttingische Anzeigen von gelehrten Sachen," June 17, 1799.
Collection: A comparative vocabulary of Indian languages (Mss.497.B28)

Algonquin | Lenape | Nanticoke | Ojibwe | Cree | Shawnee | Mohican | Unkechaug | Oneida | Cayuga | Onondaga | Miami | Cherokee | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Tuscarora | Chitimacha | Atakapa
Date: n.d., 1792-1808?; 1802-1808
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: 4 pages of words from Jefferson's standard form, with equivalents in Mohiccon and three other languages numbered as 1, 6, 7 (Mohiccon), and 8. A comparative vocabulary of 22 languages, arranged tabularly to follow Jefferson's standard printed vocabulary form. Languages include Delaware, Unami, Monsi, Chippewa, Knisteneaux, Algonquin, Tawa, Shawanee, Nanticoke, Mohiccon, Unkechaug, Oneida, Cayuga, Onondaga, Miami, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Tuscarora, Chetimacha, and Atacapa.
Collection: Comparative vocabularies of several Indian languages (Mss.497.J35)

Cherokee | Cree | Menominee | Meskwaki | Miami | Penobscot | Ojibwe | Quapaw | Shawnee
Alternate forms: Menomini
Date: 1945-1992
Type:Text
Description: The Meskwaki materials in the Siebert collection are listed under the term "Fox" and can be found in Series IV, V, VII. Much of the material consists of secondary sources, although there is some material in Siebert's notebooks (Series V). Siebert's interest in Meskwaki was primarily in terms of comparative linguistics.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Cree | Menominee | Meskwaki | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Ojibwe | Passamaquoddy | Penobscot | Potawatomi | Shawnee
Alternate forms: Menomini, Ojibwa, Ojibway
Date: 1929-1950; 1963-1982
Subject: Botany | Trade | Linguistics
Genre: Maps | Notes | Essays | Grammars
Description: The Ojibwe materials in the Siebert Papers consists primarily of secondary sources located in Series IV and VII. Siebert's comparative linguistic work on Ojibwe can be found in Series V.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Anishinaabe | Blackfoot | Arapaho | A'aninin | Cheyenne | Cree | Menominee | Ojibwe | Potawatomi | Kickapoo | Shawnee | Miami | Mi'kmaq | Abenaki | Penobscot | Lenape | Chowanoke | Secotan | Powhatan
Alternate forms: Siksika, Atsina, Gros Ventre, Micmac, Ojibwa, Ojibway
Date: ca.1950s-1996
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 2 linear feet
Description: A considerable amount of Haas' research from the 1950s onwards involved identifying language family relationships and constructing proto-languages. Comparisons, both lexical and phonological, between Algonquian languages and what Haas labeled ‘Proto-Algonkian, ‘Proto-Central Algonkian and ‘Proto-Central-Eastern Algonkian' (often abbreviated to PA, PCA and PCEA respectively) are abundant especially throughout Series 2 and Series 9. Haas made annotations to others' publications, created bibliographies, and developed family trees and lexica of both Proto-Algonquian and a wide variety of Algonquian languages, including several lexica from multiple historical sources in Series 9. Examples of the above are to be found across much of the collection, often in folders of specific Algonquian languages. See individual cultures and languages for specifics.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)