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Creek
Language(s): English
Date: 1790-1791
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume, 43 p.
Description: This volume includes the report of Caleb Swan to Henry Knox, Secretary of War (1791), in which he reports contact with and observations of the Creek Indians, while acting as deputy agent to the Creek Nation.
Collection: Caleb Swan journal extracts (Mss.B.B284.d.vol.32)

Chickasaw | Choctaw | Catawba | Tutelo | Natchez | Caddo | Lenape | Meskwaki | Tunica | Beothuk | Montauk | Seminole | Cherokee | Yuchi | Creek
Alternate forms: Fox
Language(s): English
Date: 1915-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 18 folders
Description: This entry concerns materials relating to Speck's general study of Native American peoples, languages, and cultures east of the Mississippi, as well as to his activities as a consulted expert in the field. Includes Speck's miscellaneous notes on the southeast; notes on "tribal remnants" in the southeast; notes on shamanism in the northeast; notes on the 1941 symposium Man in Northeastern America; offprints, drafts, and synopses of the work of others, sometimes with Speck's notes, including several that were printed in Frederick Johnson's 1946 volume based on the symposium, Man in Northeastern North America; archaeological reports on southeastern pottery, mound sites, and the Georgia coast; a student's master's thesis on mound-builders; and letters from various correspondents regarding eastern Indian baskets, museum specimens, the sale of Indian art and specimens, the ethnohistory of the southeast, Indian place names, archaeological sites in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, scapulimancy, copies of Indian treaties from a museum in Nova Scotia, and other topics.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Natchez | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Yuchi | Lenape | Cherokee | Creek | Osage
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1792-1897
Extent: 28 items
Description: Items relating to materials about the Native peoples of Eastern North America. Topics include papers and articles, particularly those considered for publication (on the relation of pentagonal dodecahedron found near Marietta, Ohio, to shamanism; memoir on aboriginal monuments; memoir of Dr. Charles D. Meigs on bones and burial customs; multiple items regarding a letter from S. P. Hullihen to Dr. Richard Harlan regarding inscription on a stone found at Grave Creek near Wheeling, and Thomas Townsend's claim to prior publication rights to Grave Creek inscription; Caleb Forshey's paper describing a great mound in Adams County, Mississippi; Cushing's publication on exploration of ancient key dwellers' remains on the Gulf Coast of Florida; a response to Henry Phillips' article on supposed runic inscriptions at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia); requests for information or materials (Samuel Miller's request for copies of designated Indian vocabularies of Delaware, Cherokee, Creek, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Osage, for training missionaries of United Foreign Missionary Society); donations to APS ("curiosities" taken from Indian grave near Cincinnati; relics and fossil shells found in Huntingdon County, West Virginia;"western productions"); Peter S. du Ponceau's work on Southern Indian languages and customs (including Creek, Natchez, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Yuchi), Indian vocabularies, and for APS; information from Judge William C. Frazer (Wisconsin Territory, Superior County), concerning discovery of burned bricks in Aztalan Mound, Jefferson County, Wisconsin; Cutler's estimation of age of Ohio mounds referred to in Barton (1787) using tree-ring dating; sketch of the plan of an ancient work three miles southeast of Lexington (Kentucky); American Antiquarian Society's plans to publish a volume on mounds based on Caleb Atwater's data; and comparative vocabularies of British Columbia tribes. Other individuals mentioned include Murray, Duralde, Colonel Smith, Benjamin Hawkins, Robley Dunglison, Isaac Lea, Benjamin W. Richards, George M. Wharton, Nathaniel Ware, General Wayne, Dr. Tolmie, George M. Dawson, and Abelard Tomlinson.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Houma | Creek | Tohono O'odham | Akimel O'odham | Lenape
Alternate forms: Papago, Pima, Munsee
Language(s): English
Date: 1929-1947
Extent: 11 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Houma history and culture. Includes correspondence with Houma consultants such as members of the Billiot family, Ann Celestine, Dorothy Celestine, and Ben Paul about topics including museum specimens (a pirogue, beaded belts, baskets, blow guns, etc.), land questions, and schooling problems; correspondence with government officials and academic colleagues including Willard Beatty, William Zimmerman, Joseph McCaskill, Alice Marriott, and John Reed Swanton, and others regarding Speck's field work, various aspects of his research, and the social and economic conditions of the Houma people; a draft and copy of Speck's "Report...on Houma Indians" prepared for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, concerning the history and condition of the Houma and their educational needs; notes and correspondence regarding Houma medicine and traps; and Houma specimens consisting of six bone and wood points for canoe arrows and a model of canoe with two paddles.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Onondaga | Haudenosaunee | Lenape | Creek
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1798-1897
Type:Text
Extent: 34 items
Description: Items relating to linguists and languages of the Americas. Bulk is the correspondence of Peter S. du Ponceau with Thomas Jefferson, Friedrich von Adelung, John Quincy Adams, John Vaughan, Johann S. Vater, John G. E. Heckewelder, Albert Gallatin, George Ord, and others regarding topics such as linguistics; Native languages and customs; acquiring publications for the American Philosophical Society Library; forwarding publications to others; philological essays; legal essays; Europeans' study of American Indian languages; the efforts of the Historical and Literary Committee and its pursuit of languages, especially comparative grammars; his own collection of Vocabularies; his work as an editor and linguist, including his addition to Barton (1797); Long's expedition and western vocabularies now in print; the origin of the American Indian; Byrd's manuscript of the North Carolina-Virginia boundary; the importance of comparative grammars instead of mere word-hunting; the Lewis and Clark journals; his search for Southern languages; Adelung's comment that Jefferson knew of a Mexican manuscript at New Orleans, and that Washington and others had supplied vocabularies to Catherine the Great; and plans for William Penn papers. Other items of interest include APS reports, including "Catalogue of historical manuscripts in the American Philosophical Society," Du Ponceau's "Report upon philology...and Report upon ethnography," and a letter to Mahlon Dickerson discussing objectives and scientific methods to be used on U. S. exploring expedition.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Navajo | Yuchi | Cherokee | Creek | Choctaw | Penobscot | Innu | Naskapi | Maliseet | Tunica | Chitimacha | Catawba | Inuit | Tsimshian | Seneca | Cayuga | Haudenosaunee | Cheyenne | Maya | Pueblo | Nanticoke | Catawba | Mi'kmaq | Quechua | Dakota | Chinook | Kwakwaka'wakw | Klamath | Pamunkey | Chickahominy | Rappahannock
Alternate forms: Montagnais-Naskapi, Eskimo, Iroquois, Malecite, Micmac, Sioux, Kwakiutl
Language(s): English | German
Date: 1904-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 46 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's research and other professional activities. Items include Speck's notes taken during graduate work at Columbia University under Franz Boas, and utilized for his own anthropology courses at the University of Pennsylvania; Speck's miscellaneous notes comprising circa 500 bibliographic cards and reading notes sorted out by tribe and/or language, dealing with tribes and countries in which Speck did no field work [other entries of this type are to be found among the various groups of materials in the Speck collection, according to tribe]; correspondence concerning exhibits and specimens for the Chicago World's Fair and for the Exposition of Indian Tribal Arts in New York City; two letters from Boas regarding the work of the Committee on Research in Native American Languages; correspondence regarding topics such as the double-curve motif, family hunting areas, indigenous foods and cooking methods, wampum, silverwork, birch-bark technique, baskets, Speck's research and publications, the research and publications of others, obtaining indigenous material cultural specimens for Speck, purchases of indigenous material culture specimens (baskets, masks, etc.) from Speck, Speck's identification of items in the Pitt Rivers Museum at Oxford University, Speck's bibliography, and Speck's obituary; letters requesting copies of Speck's publications, or acknowledging the transmission of publications between Speck and others; copies and/or drafts of several of Speck's presentations and publications, including "Lectures on Primitive Religion," "Land Ownership Among Hunting Peoples in Primitive America and the World's Marginal Areas," "Review of Lowie's Introduction to Cultural Anthropology," and "The Double-Curve Motive in Northeastern Algonquian Art"; a bibliography of Speck's publications through 1942; rough drafts of miscellaneous papers, 1928-1948; Speck's notes on topics such as crane posture; Birket-Smith's 1946 "Plan for Circumpolar Research"; ten distribution maps for circumpolar culture traits, colored in with crayon to show distribution of traits including divination and miracle shamanism, sweat bath, turtle Atlas myth and world-tree concept, bone divination, bear veneration, curative power of mystic words and formulae, dog-ancestor myth, dog as soul leader, curvilinear patterns, and confession to cure taboo violation; and a prepublication manuscript of Hallowell's "The nature and function of property as a human institution" with additions and corrections.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Abenaki | Cherokee | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Dakota | Odawa | Ojibwe | Miami | Osage | Pawnee | Penobscot | Stockbridge-Munsee
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Sioux, Ottawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa, Stockbridge, Wabanaki
Language(s): English
Date: 1817-1883
Type:Text
Extent: 64 reels
Description: These papers include letters, reports, accounts, and memoranda relating to the work of the American Board of Home Missions among the Abenaki, Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Dakota, Ojibwa, Miami, Osage, Pawnee, Penobscot, and Stockbridge-Munsee peoples of Arkansas, New York, and Oregon. Originals in Houghton Library, Harvard University.
Collection: Papers,1817-1883, relating to North American Indian missions (Mss.Film.1223)

Creek
Language(s): English
Date: 1798-1799
Type:Text
Genre: Reports
Extent: 1 volume
Description: One of three manuscript copies in Hawkins' hand, the other two being in the Georgia Department of Archives and History [see Pound (1951):251]. A listing of towns and villages of Muskhogee and especially Creek Indians, together with a discussion of customs, the Busketau, and answers to queries proposed to an old Creek Indian. Addenda on war parties, 1813, and treaties, 1773-1796.
Collection: Sketch of the Creek country in the years 1798 and 1799 (Mss.970.3.H31)

Inuit | Unangan | Tlingit | Muckleshoot | Nez Perce | Creek | Dakota | Lenape | Haudenosaunee | Iowa | Kickapoo | Meskwaki | Miami | Muckleshoot | Otoe | Pawnee | Shawnee | Wyandot | Tuscarora | Seneca | Onondaga | Oneida | Mohawk | Cayuga
Alternate forms: Eskimo, Aleut, Unangas, Sioux, Lenape, Iroquois, Fox, Sac and Fox, Sauk, Huron
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1937-1999
Description: This entry covers materials not otherwise covered by other entries relating to the Anthony Wallace Papers. Researchers are advised to see also the other entries devoted to specific cultural groups, Of particular interest will be Series II. Research Notes and Drafts, particularly Subseries A. Indian Research, which contains correspondence, notes and drafts from Wallace's research among the Seneca and Tuscarora. Some overlapping Native American material is in Subseries B. Revitalization and Culture. Also of particular interest will be Series IX. Indian Claims, which contains Wallace's work (with his research assistant Michal Lowenfels Kane) as an expert witness for several Native American land claims, including those of Creek, Dakota (Sioux), Delaware, Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), Iowa, Kickapoo, Meskwaki (Fox, Sac and Fox, or Sauk and Fox), Miami, Muckleshoot, Oto-Missouri, Pawnee, Shawnee, and Wyandot peoples. Another concentration of materials can be found in Series VII. Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute and pertain to Wallace's study of "arctic hysteria" (piblokto) among Greenland Inuit. Subseries B. U.S.-Soviet Commission on Anthropology of Series VI. Consulting and Committee Work also contains items on arctic populations. Materials related to Wallace's research on Native American and Indigenous topics can also be throughout Series I. Correspondence (several of Wallace's correspondents were anthropologists, historians, Native individuals, and other interested parties), Series III. Notecards, Series IV. Works by Wallace, Series V. Works by Others, Series VI. Consulting and Committee Work, Series VIII. University of Pennsylvania (to a lesser extent), Series XI. Maps, and Series XII. Graphics. Relevant correspondence files include those of the American Philosophical Society, James Axtell, Molly Nelson Archambaud (Molly Spotted Elk, Penobscot) Whitfield Bell, Robert F. Berkhofer, Carl Bridenbaugh, Edward C. Carter, Raymond Fogelson, Robert Grumet, Jeannette Henry, Stephen N. Kane, George F. Kearney, David H. Kelley, Nancy Lurie, J. T. S. McCabe, D'Arcy McNickle, Chief C. O. Nelson, Stanley Pargellis, Robert Prall, John E. Roth, Claude E. Schaefer, Donald Smith, John Tabor, Norman Tait, Morton I. Teicher, Ronald Thomas, and Katharine Young. The graphics series is also significant, containing images of pictographs, watercolor paintings by Ray Fadden's (Mohawk, aka Aren Akweks) son John (Mohawk, aka Ka-Hon-Hes), original drawings by Seneca Jesse Cornplanter and Tuscarora Nellie Gansworth, and photographs associated with Paul A.W. Wallace's fieldwork among the Indians of Pennsylvania, New York State, and Ontario as well as Anthony F.C. Wallace's research (1947-1985) on American Indians. Specific items not mentioned elsewhere include a folder on "Muckleshoot Tribe vs. the United States, Docket No. 98" and "Tee-Hit-Ton Indians vs. the United States" [the Tee-Hit-Ton are Tlingit] in Series IX. Indian Claims; a folder containing Frank Speck material on the Nanticoke in Series IV. Works by Wallace A. Professional; and a paper on the Nez Perce in Subseries 5. Student Seminar Papers of Series II. Research Notes and Drafts D. Rockdale.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)