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Catawba | Cherokee | Tutelo
Language(s): English | Catawba | Tutelo
Date: 1716; 1803; 1951-1997
Extent: 7 boxes
Description: The Catawba materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are primarily concentrated in Series II. These consist of copies of secondary sources such as an "Indian Vocabulary from Fort Christanna, 1716, Catawba census notes, 1830-1929, land claim agreements, and a dictionary of Place names in South Carolina. Original materials include hundreds of pages of Siebert's FIeld notes and a Catawba vocabulary / dictionary done with Wes Taukchiray.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Cherokee | Oneida | Onondaga | Cayuga | Seneca | Tuscarora | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Date: 1946-1989
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Cayuga materials in the Lounsbury Papers are located primarily in the "Cayuga" section of Series II, which contains extensive field notes and transcriptions made by both Lounsbury and Michael Foster of Cayuga stories and speeches given by Alexander General, Howard Skye, and Mrs. George Green, along with related discussions. See also Series VII, Audio Recordings, which includes some recordings featuring the Thanksgiving Address and the Condolence ceremony. See also correspondence in Series I, which includes Michael K. Foster's work on Cayuga Midwinter ceremonies, William Sturtevant's work with Oklahoma Seneca-Cayuga, and Marius Barbeau's materials on Cayuga and Tuscarora.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1958
Genre: Stories
Extent: 3 sound tape reels (2 hr. 2 min.)
Description: Field recordings made in North Carolina in 1958 of Cherokee sacred formulae dealing. The entirety of this recording collection has been designated as culturally sensitive and restricted.
Collection: Cherokee formulae (Mss.Rec.36)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1828-1905; 1939-1975
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Lounsbury Papers is found primarily in several sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with a number of people on Cherokee language and culture. These correspondents include Harry Basehart, William Cook, William Fenton, John D. Gillespie, Mary Haas, Jack Kilpatrick, John Witthoft. In Series II, see the "Cherokee" section, which contains 3 boxes of research materials, including Lounsbury's field notes with numerous Cherokee speakers in Oklahoma, copies of original notes by other linguists, language instruction materials, and other related documents. The "General Iroquois" section contains some comparative materials as well, as may other sections to smaller degrees. Series VI contains multiple boxes of card files with Cherokee language data in the form of lexicons and texts in translation. In Series VII, there are several audio recordings, including a reading of Private John G. Burnett's eyewitness account of Cherokee removal, 1838-1839, and a significant number of recordings of songs and dances made by Will West Long and Della Owl, and Cherokee lessons by Robert Bushyhead and William Cook.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1953, 1960-1961, 1972, 1976-1977, 1980-1981, 1984-1988, 1992-1999, 2012
Type:Text
Extent: 1123 pages
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 19 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Bender, Druke, Fogelson, Huff, Ishii, Jordan, Kilroe, Kosmider, Nichols, Phillips, Phillips, Pulte, Rachlin, Ruff, Scancarelli, Sheidley, Uchihara, and Witthoft. Some of these materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitvity or privacy considerations.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1960s-2000s
Type:Text
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: William Bright collected a small number of books on Cherokee language and culture, including a copy of the Cherokee Advocate newspaper (Series 2), as well as corresponding with Carl Masthay on Cherokee place names and with Pamela Munro on Cherokee linguistic analysis (Series 1).
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Cherokee | Lenape | Meskwaki | Nanticoke | Onondaga
Language(s): English | Cherokee | Delaware | Onondaga
Date: 1783-1817
Type:Text
Extent: 107 pages
Description: These letters authored by Benjamin Barton Smith to various correspondents discuss Indian vocabulary words for birds, earthquakes, and animals of their domestic economy. Smith solicits information about Indian beliefs about health, nursing, menstration, animal sacrifice, Indian Bible, origins of Indian tribes, white race, Orthography and spelling, chief's political power, and comparative linguistic analysis between Indian and Asiatic languages.
Collection: Violetta Delafield-Benjamin Smith Barton Collection (Mss.B.B284d)

Lenape | Shawnee | Ojibwe | Narragansett | Cherokee | Creek | Powhatan | Haudenosaunee | Mohican | Mandan
Alternate forms: Lenape, Chippewa, Ojibwa, Iroquois
Language(s): English | German | Delaware
Date: 1816-1822
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet, circa 115 items
Description: Letters from Moravian missionary, historian, and linguist John Gottlieb Ernestus Heckewelder, mostly to Peter Stephen du Ponceau with one to Caspar Wistar. Some of the replies from Du Ponceau are copied in the letter books of the Historical and Literary Committee. Heckewelder most frequently wrote of the publications he was working on or revising, particularly his Account of the Indian nations (1819), Narrative (1820), Heckewelder (1821), a Mohican (Mohegan) vocabulary, remarks on a Swedish-Delaware vocabulary, etc., some of which were to be published or republished by the American Philosophical Society. Many letters thus revolve around the research, writing, and publishing processes, including Heckewelder's responses to du Ponceau's edits and suggestions; his own edits, additions, lists of errors, etc.; his concern that errors by the typesetter could bring criticism on linguistic portions; new information and discoveries, such as the finding of a Maqua (Haudenosaunee) manuscript in the Moravian Archives; negative reviews and criticisms of his work, like an objectionable review in the North American Review (1819), a review in the Westchester Village Record disputing the role of Delaware as women, and William Darby's disagreement about Heckewelder's account of the killing of Native people by Williamson and his men; more positive responses to his work, like an honorary membership in the Massachusetts Peace Society for his Account (1819); translation of his work into German and other languages; and his insistence that the American Philosophical Society imprimatur appear on the title page, because as a Moravian he could not publish anything on his own relating to the Society of the United Brethren. Heckewelder repeatedly touched on Native languages and matters of linguistics: among other things, he referred to the Native vocabularies he himself had collected; a Swedish-Delaware catechism and dispute over "r" or "l" sound; difficulties in hearing Indian languages properly; difficulties in writing Native American languages; comparisons between his own findings and linguistic materials and scholarship published by others (of whom he was often critical); several examples of Delaware or Lenape words, roots, paradigms, gender, usage, etc.; and comparions of Delaware to other Native languages like Ojibwe, Shawnee, Natick, and Narragansett. Heckewelder's letters reveal him to be well-read and immersed in a network of similarly-minded scholars trading information and forwarding books and articles. Specific works by others mentioned include the Steiner article in Columbian Magazine (September 1789); a Pickering-Du Ponceau Dencke's version of St. John's Epistles in Delaware; Zeisberger's Bible translation and Life of Christ; Poulson's paper relating Welsh to Powhatan (which Heckewelder deems incorrect on the basis that Powhatan was Delaware); Pickering's essay on a uniform Orthography and spelling; Eliot's Bible translation; a paper by Zeisberger on Delaware being made men again (#865) and Zeisberger's replies (#341) to 23 queries of Barton (#1636); Loskiel's history (Heckewelder notes general verification in Loskiel for specific incidents and believes that the absence of certain incidents in Loskiel's history is the result of missionary discretion); works by Barton (he criticizes Barton for seeking speedy answers to questions of Indian origins, and for thinking Delaware and Iroquois related); and various publications of the Historical and Literary Committee. Heckewelder also wrote about "Indian affairs" such as the Jefferson-Cresap dispute (over Logan speech and affair); Benton's resolution concerning the Christian Indians and Moravian land; the speech of a Delaware at Detroit, 1781; and Heckewelder's role in the Washington City Society for Civilizing the Indians. Ethnographic topics include Native American names, place names, childbirth, swimming, friendship, treatment of captives, derivation of "papoose," names of trees and rivers, and various anecdotes. Other individuals mentioned include Rev. Schulz, Butrick, Colonel Arent Schyler De Peyster, Captain Pipe, Vater, Hesse, Gambold, John Vaughan, Charles Thomson, Thomas Jefferson, Deborah Norris Logan, Mitchill, Daniel Drake, Abraham Steiner, Noah Webster du Ponceau's brother, etc. Heckewelder's letter to Wistar regarding the Naked Bear traditions was printed (except last paragraph) in the Transactions of the Historical and Literary Committee of the American Philosophical Society 1: 363.
Collection: John Gottlieb Ernestus Heckewelder letters, 1816-1822, to Peter Stephen Du Ponceau (Mss.497.3.H35o)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1880-1932
Type:Text
Extent: 19 items
Description: The Frank Speck Cherokee Collection consists of diaries, accounts, and medicinal texts in Cherokee (syllabary) collected by Will West Long and Morgan Calhoun, accompanied by notes by Speck and John Witthoft. These include several diaries kept by Long (mostly 1904-1917), records of the Gadugi (a Cherokee mutual aid group), accounts, records of births and deaths at Big Cove, and material collected on Cherokee botany collected by James Mooney in 1887. Several of the items contain information on Cherokee medicine, including formulae and curing charms. Many of these items have been designated as culturally sensitive and may not be reproduced, nor photographed in the Reading Room.
Collection: Frank Gouldsmith Speck Cherokee Collection (Mss.572.97.Sp3L)