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A'aninin | Anishinaabe | Apache | Apache, Plains | Apache, Western | Arapaho | Arikara | Assiniboine | Blackfoot | Caddo | Catawba | Cayuga | Cherokee | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Comanche | Creek | Crow | Lenape | Flathead | Haudenosaunee | Ho-Chunk | Hopi | Houma | Iñupiat | Iowa | Isleta | Kaw | Kickapoo | Laguna | Lakota | Mandan | Menominee | Meskwaki | Munsee | Nez Perce | Ojibwe | Omaha | Oneida | Otoe | Odawa | Penobscot | Pawnee | Ponca | Potawatomi | Quapaw | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Shoshone | Stockbridge-Munsee | Tsimshian | Wabanaki | Wichita | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Arapahoe, Chippewa, Eskimo, Gros Ventre, Iroquois, Kansa, Lenape, Muscogee, Niimíipu, Odawa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Salish, Sioux, Sac-and-Fox, Sauk-and-Fox, Winnebago, Wyandotte
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1943
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: There are a few items in the Frank G. Speck Papers currently identified as relating to Indian boarding schools.In the collection guide, under Subcollection 1, Series 1, in Section IV, "Southeast," see item IV(15H3), "Yuchi miscellaneous notes," which contains a letter from Ann Rolland (Haskell Institute), to Speck, April 6, 1941, as well as items under "C. Houma (Louisiana)" that relate to mission schools. In Section XIII, "Miscellaneous," see item XIII(22H), "Haskell Institute Roster," which lists of Native students and the Haskell Institute boarding school in 1939-1940, giving name, age, address, and tribe. (The tribes of the students included are listed above in this entry.) In Subcollection I, Series II, Biographical Material, see letters (listed alphabetically by author) from Leona E. Giger and Ann Rolland, both students at Haskell in the early 1940s. Also see letter from "Redge" and Gladys Laulin regarding Chippewa boy returning home for dances. In Series III, Photographs, there is an undated photograph [#10-14(a)] from the Shingwauk Indian Residential School. See also school-related photos in folders "Creek #3," "Eskimo [Inuit] (Labrador) #4," "Houma #1," #2, #7, and #8, "Pamunkey #6," and "Penobscot: People #2." In Series IV, Lantern Slides, there are slides of Native and Black students at the Hampton Institute. More boarding school-related material may be identified in the collection with further research.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago, Ojibwa, Chippewa
Language(s): English | Ojibwe | Ho-Chunk
Date: 1822
Contributor: Kelso, Henry B.
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: Ojibwa-English vocabulary, no order. Ho-chunk numerals. Family genealogical data and miscellaneous jottings.
Collection: Indian dictionary, Green Bay (Mss.497.3.K295)

Anishinaabe | Ho-Chunk | Kiowa | Menominee | Meskwaki | Miami | Narragansett | Ojibwe | Odawa | Potawatomi | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Fox, Menomini, Odawa, Ojibwa, Sauk, Winnebago
Language(s): English
Date: 1953-1967
Extent: 9 sound tape reels (9 hr., 55 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: The first section (Series I) of this recording collection consists of 13 episodes of the radio program "Red Man in Michigan," broadcast on WUOM radio in Ann Arbor, Michigan. These programs use extensive clips from field recordings made by Gertrude Prokosch Kurath, and cover a wide range of historical and contemporary topics directed to a general non-Native audience. Series II consists of tapes including Ottawa language hymns from a series of programs titled "Comparisons of Chippewa Revival Hymns, Michigan and Ontario, 1953-1962"; interviews on the organization of United Church, on the organization of Camp Meetings, on missionary experiences, especially at Perry Island and Moose Point, Ontario; recordings of powwows at Ann Arbor, Lansing, and Hastings, including some Kiowa performances by John Bosin; an interview with Jim Eagle Shaffer; and an interview with Anna Fulton, Douglas Fulton, and Bruce Fulton on socio-economic conditions and racial discrimination against Native people in Michigan. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Observations on Michigan Indians (Mss.Rec.63)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Potawatomi | Ho-Chunk | Meskwaki | Dakota | Menominee | Stockbridge-Munsee | Oneida | Iowa
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa, Winnebago, Sac, Sauk, Fox, Sioux, Chiwere, Ioway
Language(s): English
Date: 1835-1838
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: Letters discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains and observations of contemporary Native people. Houghton has been among Winnebago, Sacs, Foxes, and Sioux; can get Pottawatomi, Winnebago, and Chippewa skulls, but to get to know personages may take longer; Pitcher is sending sketch to go with a skull. Dr. Wheaton, evidently an army surgeon, spent 1822-1827 at Sault Ste. Marie, then at Mackinaw and Green Bay; consumption infrequent among soldiers, French residents, and Indians, which he attributes to the dry cold climate there; recommends such as treatment for sufferers. Pitcher resigned his Army job for private practice and to assist in forming the medical department of the new University of Michigan. He will send Chippewa skulls to help Morton "build up something like an American Golgotha." Schoolcraft advises Morton to come to Mackinac for treaty payments, where he can see Indians, and suggests a route he can take west to see more Indians. Mentions Chippewa, Menominee, Winnebagos, Stockbridge (Mohegan), Brothertowns, Oneidas, Sioux, Iowa, Sac and Fox Indians.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)