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Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Maliseet | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki | Atikamekw
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Tete de Boule
Date: 1914-1930
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Hallowell Papers are mostly located in Series V, Research Files, in folders labled "Abenaki" and Series VI, Photographs, Subseries E "St. Francis Abenaki Album." These include linguistic, ethnographic, ethnobotanical, ceremonial knowledge, information on political organization, and historical materials. Of particular interest are a sketch of Abenaki history from 1600-1930 accompanied by detailed notes from secondary sources on 17th century Abenaki history. The linguistic materials include an analysis of how the language changed after contact with Catholic missionaries, Abenaki vocabulary related to body parts, Abenaki phonetics, and religious, medical, and kinship terminology. The ethnobotanical materials include a manuscript labled "Identity of animals and plants," and information concerning herbal medicine and its practitioners. There is a wealth of ethnographic materials that include drawings of pipes, descriptions of games, baketry and birch bark maks. There is descriptions of Abenaki music and diagrams of dances, as well as detailed descriptions of hunting techniques. Some of the genealogical materials contains lists of community members names and descriptions of marriage. Interspered throughout the folders labled "Abenaki" in the Research Files are interlinear translations of stories such as "Man who could Find Lost Objects," "Woman and Bear Lover" and numerous other stories. The materials on hunting include topics such as the use of snow shoes, preparation of moose hide,and techniques and drawings of trapping. The collections contain important information designation hunting territories and family names. Four folders contain detailed informaiton on kinship terms. Two folders on Measurements and Genealogical data contain lists of names. The folders labled "Linguistics" in Series V contain scattered information about Abenaki grammar. In Series VI, of 160 photographs taken at St. Francis, Odanak in the Centre-du-Québec region. The Abenaki people in the photographs are identified, in most cases, and also include depictions of traditional dress, buildings, clothing, baskets, and a wide variety of material culture. The correspondence, in Series I, includes letters from Theophile Panadis; Gordon Day describing his collection of stories, recordings, vocabularies, and hunting territories. Henry Lorne Masta, one of Hallowell's Abenaki consultants, writes about culture and language. Additional correspondents may contain other Abenaki-related information.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Lenape
Alternate forms: Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 24 pages
Description: This bibliography is a guide to writings about a chronicle of the Lenape Indians, first studied by Constantine S. Rafinesque, and subsequently by Ephraim G. Squier and Daniel G. Brinton. It is divided into four sections: Rafinesque, with four sources on the man; Walam Olum, listing all known Anthropological Studies; and References, to the Walam Olum. [Note that the Walam Olum has since been discredited as a fraud perpetuated by Rafinesque. See, for instance, David M. Oestreicher, "Unmasking the Walam Olum: A 19th-Century Hoax," Archaeological Society of New Jersey, Bulletin, no. 49 (1994, 1-44); and Oestreicher, "Unraveling the Walam Olum," Natural History, October 1996, 14-21.] From original loaned by Paul A. W. Wallace, 1952.
Collection: Bibliography, of the Walam Olum (Mss.Film.585)

Eyak
Language(s): Eyak | English | Tlingit
Date: ca.1930s
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 1 folder
Description: Haas appears to have been preparing in the 1930s for a fieldtrip to Alaska that never materialized. She collected information on Eyak phonology and on several speakers of Eyak in Cordova, Alaska, details of which can be found in Series 2 Subseries ‘Eyak' and possibly also Series 1 correspondence with Frederica de Laguna. There are also comparisons with Tlingit and other Dene languages in Series 9.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Shawnee | Seneca
Language(s): English | Shawnee
Date: 1700s-1989
Extent: 40 linear feet
Description: This collection consists almost entirely of photocopies of secondary and primary materials relating to Shawnee history and culture, and the history of the Ohio River region. The majority of the materials are copies of published sources, from the 18th to 20th century, with Stevens' notes on them. The collection is organized according to the topics by which Stevens kept his copies and notes, covering a very broad range of subject matter.
Collection: Harry Stevens Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.99)

Koasati
Alternate forms: Coushatta
Language(s): Koasati | English
Date: 1930s-1980s
Type:Text
Extent: 1.75 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas' Koasati file is quite extensive. Field notes from the 1930s can be found in Series 2 Subseries ‘Multiple Languages' and ‘Koasati', and include several interlinear texts, notably a transcription of a handwritten letter in the language between Jackson Langley and Louisa Carson. Notes on Haas' Oklahoma consultants also feature in Series 2. There are several versions of a 124-page typeset dictionary with no attribution, also in Series 2. A great many lexical slips can be found in Series 9, as well as a 575+ item wordlist in Series 2, with frequent comparison to Muskogean and “Gulf” languages as part of Haas' historical linguistics efforts. In addition there are many works by others on Koasati, in Series 8.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Haudenosaunee | Seneca | Tuscarora | Mohawk
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1940
Type:Text
Extent: 1 reel
Description: "Letters and documents relating to the government service of Jasper Parrish among the Indians of New York State," compiled and edited by Mrs. Dorothy May Fairbanks Newton, 1940. This Vassar College student thesis contains text written by Newton, transcriptions of letters to and from Parrish [aka Parish, an Indian agent and interpreter] and other documents, and 54 letters and 5 maps pertaining to Indian affairs in New York State. Newton used primary documents found in Vassar College's Jasper Parrish Papers Collection. Originals of both thesis and the primary documents it is based on are at Vassar College.
Collection: Letters and documents relating to the government service of Jasper Parrish among the Indians of New York state, 1790-1831 (Mss.Film.650)

Miami
Language(s): Miami-Illinois | English
Date: 1930s, 1960s, undated
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 0.1 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas' small Miami-Illinois file consists of a 275-550 card lexical slip file, with some comparison to Algonquian languages (Series 9), a shorter set of index cards in Series 2 among Proto-Central-Algonquian manuscripts, and a biographical note on Old Lady Walker, in a field notebook of various languages in Oklahoma, 1930s (Series 2).
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Mohican
Alternate forms: Mahican
Language(s): English | Mahican | Nuu-chah-nulth
Date: 1795; 1937-1944
Type:Text
Extent: 286 pages, 1 notebook, approx. 6,100 slips
Description: The Mohican collection in the ACLS collection consist of a variety of items in the "Mohican" section of the finding aid. These materials were recorded by Morris Swadesh at the Stockbrige-Munsee community in Wisconsin and are predominantly focused on linguistic matters. They include field notes, interlinear translation of 18th century liturgical literature from Massachusetts, a narrative biography, copies of historical materials, and an extensive lexical file derived from these sources. A significant amount of the "Mohican lexical file" also contains Nuu-chah-nulth lexical slips by Swadesh that were interfiled and have not yet been separated out.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1822
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: Place names (taken from deeds of conveyance, maps, and narrated by Indians), for Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia, together with names and biographies of chiefs and famous men. Translations.
Collection: Names which the Lenni Lenape...had given to rivers, streams, places, etc. (Mss.497.3.H35n)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Saulteaux
Date: 1932-1949
Description: The Ojibwe materials in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers are extensive. Hallowell focused on three regions of Ojibwe territory: Berens River in north, central Canada (Pikangikum, Pauingassi, Poplar River; Little Grand Rapids First Nations) and Lac du Flambeau in Wisconsin. Hallowell was particularly interested in psychological anthropology. Both the Berens River and Lac du Flambeau materials in Series V, for example, includes ethnographic information on taboos, incest regulations, Rorschach tests, dreams, and acculturation. Hallowell's interests in traditional knowledge are represented by descriptions of the practice of the Midewiwin religion; traditional stories about Wisakedjak and Tcakabec/Chakabesh, Memegwesiug, Windigos, and Thunderbirds. Of particular interest in the Lac du Flambeau materials are hundred of pages of family biographies in Series V and photographs with the names of community members in Series VI, Subseries B. Of particular interest in the Berens River materials are maps of traditional hunting grounds, a diagram of Ojibwe cosmology, an autobiography by Hallowell's collaborator Chief William Berens, 29 folders of "Saulteaux Indians--Myths and Tales" all in Series V. There are hundreds of photographs from the region, with many community members identified, and all digitized, in Series VI, Subseries A. The correspondence, in Series I, includes Robert Ritzenhaler's description of a shaking tent ceremony by Ojibwe in Wisconsin; a detailed account of Joseph Fiddler's trial for murdering a windigo in the folder labled Royal Canadian Mounted Police; papers sent by Morton Teicher detailing incidents of windigo in Canada (50+ pages); a letter from Frances Densmore describing a shaking tent ceremony; and several letters from Chief William Berens providing information about Ojibwe people in the photographs in Series VI.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)