Current Filters
Click filter to remove
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7
Mi'kmaq | Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Beothuk | Cherokee
Alternate forms: Micmac, Malecite
Language(s): English | Mi'kmaq
Date: 1909-1949
Type:Text
Extent: 8 folders
Description: Materials relating to Mi'kmaq history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's field notes on topics such as wampum, hunting territories, Cape Breton texts, Newfoundland traditions, the Passamaquoddy, etc., as well as a map with names of Bear River Band members and one piece of birch bark with pictographs inscribed; Speck's miscellaneous notes and correspondence on topics such as consultants, specimens, hieroglyphics, linguistics, fieldwork, Mi'kmaq and Cherokee, and the Mi'kmaq mission newspaper; a text on Mi'kmaq dance with interlinear translation, notes, and a musical score; 10 pages of linguistic notes and vocabulary collected along the Miramichi River, along with 6 pages of typed copy by John Witthoft; correspondence with Mechling concerning linguistic research on the Mi'kmaq, Malecite [Malecite-Passamaquoddy], and Oaxaca languages, Mi'kmaq burials, and historic materials on Beothuk and Mi'kmaq; a brief article on a traveler's account of the Mi'kmaq in 1822; an incomplete article or set of reading excerpts taken after 1922 by Speck from John G. Millais (1907); and extracts concerning the sweat house taken by Butler from the Jesuit Relations.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Navajo | Yuchi | Cherokee | Creek | Choctaw | Penobscot | Innu | Naskapi | Maliseet | Tunica | Chitimacha | Catawba | Inuit | Tsimshian | Seneca | Cayuga | Haudenosaunee | Cheyenne | Maya | Pueblo | Nanticoke | Catawba | Mi'kmaq | Quechua | Dakota | Chinook | Kwakwaka'wakw | Klamath | Pamunkey | Chickahominy | Rappahannock
Alternate forms: Montagnais-Naskapi, Eskimo, Iroquois, Malecite, Micmac, Sioux, Kwakiutl
Language(s): English | German
Date: 1904-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 46 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's research and other professional activities. Items include Speck's notes taken during graduate work at Columbia University under Franz Boas, and utilized for his own anthropology courses at the University of Pennsylvania; Speck's miscellaneous notes comprising circa 500 bibliographic cards and reading notes sorted out by tribe and/or language, dealing with tribes and countries in which Speck did no field work [other entries of this type are to be found among the various groups of materials in the Speck collection, according to tribe]; correspondence concerning exhibits and specimens for the Chicago World's Fair and for the Exposition of Indian Tribal Arts in New York City; two letters from Boas regarding the work of the Committee on Research in Native American Languages; correspondence regarding topics such as the double-curve motif, family hunting areas, indigenous foods and cooking methods, wampum, silverwork, birch-bark technique, baskets, Speck's research and publications, the research and publications of others, obtaining indigenous material cultural specimens for Speck, purchases of indigenous material culture specimens (baskets, masks, etc.) from Speck, Speck's identification of items in the Pitt Rivers Museum at Oxford University, Speck's bibliography, and Speck's obituary; letters requesting copies of Speck's publications, or acknowledging the transmission of publications between Speck and others; copies and/or drafts of several of Speck's presentations and publications, including "Lectures on Primitive Religion," "Land Ownership Among Hunting Peoples in Primitive America and the World's Marginal Areas," "Review of Lowie's Introduction to Cultural Anthropology," and "The Double-Curve Motive in Northeastern Algonquian Art"; a bibliography of Speck's publications through 1942; rough drafts of miscellaneous papers, 1928-1948; Speck's notes on topics such as crane posture; Birket-Smith's 1946 "Plan for Circumpolar Research"; ten distribution maps for circumpolar culture traits, colored in with crayon to show distribution of traits including divination and miracle shamanism, sweat bath, turtle Atlas myth and world-tree concept, bone divination, bear veneration, curative power of mystic words and formulae, dog-ancestor myth, dog as soul leader, curvilinear patterns, and confession to cure taboo violation; and a prepublication manuscript of Hallowell's "The nature and function of property as a human institution" with additions and corrections.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Seneca | Haudenosaunee | Cree | Naskapi | Innu
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa, Iroquois
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1927-1949
Type:Text
Extent: 14 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Ojibwe language, history, and culture. Includes 15 pages of Tamagami [Temagami First Nation] myths and five texts in English; 21 pages of Matagama Ojibwe [Mattagami First Nation] notes, including a 2-page phonetic key, a letter from Speck to Samuel (i.e., James) Miller of Gogama requesting ethnographic and map data, 2 maps (one of Mattagami hunting territories), typed reading notes, and a sketch of a play for Mattagama Otcipwe [sic]; a Christmas circular letter telling the story of a Chippewa [Ojibwe] boy returning home for Dance; a copy of Speck's favorable review of Sister Bernard Coleman, "Decorative designs of the Ojibwa of northern Minnesota" [Printed, Speck (1949).]; and a brief popular account on Ojibwe hunting territories by Speck, refuting Roosevelt (1889-1896), who had denied that Indians have a sense of property, along with two pages of notes. Also includes several folders of correspondence, including correspondence with A. I. Hallowell in which Hallowell describes a field trip to the Berens River Saulteaux, Sweet Grass Cree (mentions attitude of Cree to Leonard Bloomfield), and Cold Lake Chipewyan, festivals, etc., and a letter from Speck to Hallowell with pencilled responses of Hallowell to questions asked; letters from D. H. Learmouth, a factor for Hudson's Bay Company at Waswanippi, recounting his experiences in adjudicating Matagama land inheritance and providing ethnographic data sought by Speck from Samuel (i.e., James) Miller of Gogama and data on hunting territories; letters from James E. Holden concerning unsuccessful attempts to purchase baskets at Nipigon; letters from J. Allan Burgesse regarding the Matagama Ojibwe and enclosing a drawing of a "flesher"and a list of hunting territories and biographical information on owners; a letter from Robert Solenberger concerning Tonawanda [Seneca] and Chippewa [Ojibwe] women who make baskets and giving their addresses; a letter from B. W. Thayer concerning Ojibwe beadwork found during a Minnesota field trip; a letter from Henry Woodman discussing the decline of crafts among Bear Island Indians (Temagami); a letter from Prentice Gilbert Downes about the circumboreal region, disucssing his visit to Naskapi near Davis Inlet, to Cree, and to Chippewas, along with 2 pages of notes (Speck?) in French-English, discussing changes in Indian culture; and a letter from Speck to Chief Mitchele Buckshot in Maniwaki, Quebec requesting buckskin and beadwork.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Penobscot | Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Mi'kmaq | Haudenosaunee | Abenaki | Lenape | Mohegan | Mohican | Zuni | Navajo | Tutelo | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Micmac, Lenape, Mahican, Malecite
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1908-1947
Extent: 27 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Penobscot language, history, and culture, and his preparation of his book Penobscot Man. This includes several folders of Speck's field notes, notes organized around specific topics (including data not used in Speck's published works), copies and drafts of lectures and essays, correspondence, etc. Topics include Penobscot social organization, calendar system, house furnishings, hunting morality, animal lore, religion, art, sayings, alphabet, counting and measuring, canoe-making, face-painting, texts with interlineal translations, and "Bird Lore of the Northern Indians" (a faculty public lecture at the University of Pennsylvania). Additionally, significant correspondence concerns the preparation, expenses, dissemination, and reception of his Penobscot publications. Other topics of correspondence include Ethel Gandy's monograph on Penobscot art; names of chiefs and their clans; "clown" performances outside of the southwest among the Penobscot, Iroquois [Haudenosaunee], Abenaki, and Delaware; place names; the relationship of Penobscot-Mohegan and Mahican; a comparison of Zuni-Navajo and Red Paint; Tutelo. There is a particularly large folder of Speck's miscellaneous Penobscot notes containing both a variety of notes and correspondence from Penobscot consultants as well as non-Native colleagues. These include letters from Roland E. Nelson (Needahbeh, Penobscot) concerning drum for exhibit; letters from Nelson, Franz Boas, John M. Cooper, William B. Goodwin, E. V. McCollum, and J. Dyneley Prince, all concerning Penobscot Man; Clifford P. Wilson concerning moosehair embroidery; Edward Reman concerning Norse influence on Penobscot; Carrie A. Lyford concerning moose-wool controversy and Ann Stimson's report; Ann Stimson, letter of thanks; Henry Noyes Otis concerning genealogy of Indians named Sias on Cape Cod (Speck marked this Penobscot); Princess Pretty Woman (Passamaquoddy) concerning her dress (apparently at the Penn Museum); Dorothy Ranco (Penobscot) concerning Princess Pretty Woman's dress; Roland W. Mann, concerning site of Indian occupancy according to Penobscot tradition; Ryuzo Torii, letter of introduction. Other miscellaneous items include a 5-page transcript of agreements between Indians of Nova Scotia and the English, August 15, 1749; 2 pages, transcript of agreement of July 13, 1727 (letter of transmittal, Lloyd Price to Miss MacDonald, September 24, 1936); Ann K. Stimson, Moose Wool and Climbing Powers of the American Mink; miscellaneous field notes on topics like songs, kinship, totem, medicine, and social units; and 4 pages of Penobscot words and their cultural use.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Seneca | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Seneca
Date: 1921-1949
Extent: 16 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's interest in Seneca language, history, and culture. Several folders contain correspondence, including one with six letters from Jesse Cornplanter to Speck and others on topics such as his religious beliefs and changes in the way of life; praising Speck; pay for Native consultants; sending Christmas greetings; and husk faces. Other correspondence includes letters from Charles E. Congdon concerning Coldspring Longhouse ceremonies, use of stick and post in dance, Tonawanda and Cattaraugus medicines, congratulating Speck on his Iroquois (1945), describing Alleghany ceremonials, and giving a sketch of the arrangement of participants; from James M. Luongo concerning Seneca and other specimens; from Clara Redeye transmitting a 1941 picture of four generations and sending dolls; from Spencer F. William, a Seneca writer seeking work; from Evangeline Clark sending thanks for reprints, which she had sent to Suffolk University; from Merle H. Deardorff concerning consultant Clayton White, Pennsylvania place names, Speck (1942), and a lengthy discussion of the practices of Handsome Lake adherents; and from Speck to Deardorff concerning an Iroquois conference at Allegany. Other folders contain William N. Fenton's Seneca ceremonial calendar from Coldspring, 131 pages of organized, detailed field notes on ceremonies; Congdon's 4-page essay comparing the religion of Handsome Lake with Judaism and Greco-Roman spirits; Clayton White's description of the one-year death feast; Clayton White's description of a False Face Dance at Coldspring Long House, taken for Deardorff; Speck's miscellaneous notes containing words and two letters from Sherman Redeye to Speck concerning corn-husk masks; Speck's notes on the Oklahoma Seneca with an outline of ceremonials and a chart, with special attention to dances and funerary practices; and Ferdinand Isserman's student paper "Mythology of Seneca Indians." Some of these materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Tutelo | Lenape | Cayuga | Onondaga
Language(s): English
Date: 1931-1942
Type:Text
Extent: 5 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's interest in Tutelo language, history, and culture. These include three letters from Canadian (Grand River, Ontario) Delaware Samuel John concerning John's Tutelo background and Speck's visit to Canadian Delawares; Speck's field notes from Grand River, Ontario on recordings of Tutelo and Onondaga songs and noting the order of rites [see also Speck (1942)]; Speck's Tutelo field notes from Ohsweken including a notebook of 53 pages of ceremonials, an account of Tutelo ceremonial procedure, a note on the Cayuga burial and redressing ceremony, and letters from indigenous consultants George Nash and Mrs. John Ruck concerning museum specimens; 12 pages of miscellaneous notes and correspondence, including a 1-page list of Tutelo names, 2 pages on Longhouse religious ceremonies, 1 note card and 4 pages of reading notes on adoption rites, two letters from John R. Swanton to Speck citing Byrd's History of the Dividing Line for Sappony-Tutelo references and concerning Tutelo linguistic forms and relationships, a letter from William N. Fenton to Speck concerning Tutelo songs and difficulties of attending Seneca longhouse ceremonies, and a letter from H. W. Dorsey (Smithsonian Institution) transmitting a photo of a Tutelo adoption necklace; and an 11-page draft of an essay on Tutulo ceremonies focusing on the adoption rite. (NOTE: portions of these materials pertaining to Tutelo ceremonies may be restricted due to potential cultural sensitivity.)
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Yuchi | Natchez | Muscogee | Osage | Navajo | Cayuga
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English | Muscogee | Yuchi
Date: 1904-1945
Type:Text
Extent: 5 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's interest in Yuchi language, history, and culture. Includes three letters from Roy H. Robinson to Speck concerning persuading Yuchis to answer questions, Cayuga earrings, a Navajo beaded necklace, Osage buffalo hide shield, etc.; a 13-page report titled "Yuchi Ethnography" on political organization, diseases, mythology, etc., based on a 1904 field trip; a folder on Yuchi and Creek dances with sheet music for songs to accompany dance, choreography, and a few vocabulary items with a folder on Yuchi and Creek songs along with 12 vocabulary slips; and 17 pages of Speck's miscellaneous Yuchi notes and correspondence, including one page concerning Yalewi, a Yuchi Indian; one card concerning peyote among Yuchi; a one-page list of names of informants, 1941; a letter from Erich von Hornbostel to Speck, concerning Yuchi songs; a letter from Ellen Allen, a Yuchi Indian, recalling Speck's visit in 1904 and Boas' visit and effort to do a Yuchi grammar with her; a letter from Carl F. Voegelin concerning Yuchi linguistics; letters from Charles Eli Sexton to the University of Pennsylvania Museum concerning Speck's Yuchi ethnography, a Yuchi informant, and connection of Natchez and Hopewell to Yuchi; and letters from Ann Rolland (Haskell Institute) concerning Yuchi museum specimens and relics of the past.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)