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Aymara | Quechua
Language(s): English | Aymara | Spanish
Date: 1950-1972
Description: The Aymara materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist of comparative linguistics and studies of kinship in Series II. Of particular interest are the audio recordings in Series VII on the folklore of the Ayar Incas. The correspondence, in Series I, contains information of the geographic distribution of the language, Lounsbury's analysis of the language and its relationship to Quechua, Christian scriptures in Aymara, Morris Swadesh's work on genetic classification of Native American languages, and geographic distribution of Aymara population.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Navajo | Yuchi | Cherokee | Creek | Choctaw | Penobscot | Innu | Naskapi | Maliseet | Tunica | Chitimacha | Catawba | Inuit | Tsimshian | Seneca | Cayuga | Haudenosaunee | Cheyenne | Maya | Pueblo | Nanticoke | Catawba | Mi'kmaq | Quechua | Dakota | Chinook | Kwakwaka'wakw | Klamath | Pamunkey | Chickahominy | Rappahannock
Alternate forms: Montagnais-Naskapi, Eskimo, Iroquois, Malecite, Micmac, Sioux, Kwakiutl
Language(s): English | German
Date: 1904-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 46 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's research and other professional activities. Items include Speck's notes taken during graduate work at Columbia University under Franz Boas, and utilized for his own anthropology courses at the University of Pennsylvania; Speck's miscellaneous notes comprising circa 500 bibliographic cards and reading notes sorted out by tribe and/or language, dealing with tribes and countries in which Speck did no field work [other entries of this type are to be found among the various groups of materials in the Speck collection, according to tribe]; correspondence concerning exhibits and specimens for the Chicago World's Fair and for the Exposition of Indian Tribal Arts in New York City; two letters from Boas regarding the work of the Committee on Research in Native American Languages; correspondence regarding topics such as the double-curve motif, family hunting areas, indigenous foods and cooking methods, wampum, silverwork, birch-bark technique, baskets, Speck's research and publications, the research and publications of others, obtaining indigenous material cultural specimens for Speck, purchases of indigenous material culture specimens (baskets, masks, etc.) from Speck, Speck's identification of items in the Pitt Rivers Museum at Oxford University, Speck's bibliography, and Speck's obituary; letters requesting copies of Speck's publications, or acknowledging the transmission of publications between Speck and others; copies and/or drafts of several of Speck's presentations and publications, including "Lectures on Primitive Religion," "Land Ownership Among Hunting Peoples in Primitive America and the World's Marginal Areas," "Review of Lowie's Introduction to Cultural Anthropology," and "The Double-Curve Motive in Northeastern Algonquian Art"; a bibliography of Speck's publications through 1942; rough drafts of miscellaneous papers, 1928-1948; Speck's notes on topics such as crane posture; Birket-Smith's 1946 "Plan for Circumpolar Research"; ten distribution maps for circumpolar culture traits, colored in with crayon to show distribution of traits including divination and miracle shamanism, sweat bath, turtle Atlas myth and world-tree concept, bone divination, bear veneration, curative power of mystic words and formulae, dog-ancestor myth, dog as soul leader, curvilinear patterns, and confession to cure taboo violation; and a prepublication manuscript of Hallowell's "The nature and function of property as a human institution" with additions and corrections.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Quechua
Language(s): Quechua | English | Takelma
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 0.1 linear feet
Description: Daythal Kendall collected and added marginalia to several publications and sets of archival materials on Quechua, particularly identifying correspondences between Quechua and Takelma. These are to be found in Series 2 and 5.
Collection: Daythal L. Kendall Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.148)

Quechua | Cocama | Tohono O'odham | Akimel O'odham | Cocama
Alternate forms: Papago, Pima
Date: 1941-1948
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: Materials relating to Quechua language and culture. Includes John Peabody Harrington's correspondence with John Alden Mason regarding Harrington's work on the Hokan nature of Quechua and on Pima-Papago [Tohono O'odham, and possibly Akimel O'odham]; Harrington's "The nominal derivational suffixes of Quechua" with a list of the suffixes with examples, a brief discussion by Harrington, and Mason's comments; Harrington's "Adjective derivational suffixes of Quechua," a listing of suffixes with brief comments and one slip of Mason's comments; and Harrington and Luis Valcárcel's "Grammarlets of the Quechua and Cocama languages," with grammatical sketch of Quechua and a very brief sketch of Cocama [Cocama-Cocamilla].
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Tupi | Rama | Quechua | Guarani | Cocama | Kogi | Chibcha | Guna | Aymara | Kawahiva | Ese Ejja | Yanesha' | Inca
Alternate forms: Kuna
Date: 1937-1960 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 23 items
Description: Materials relating to John Alden Mason's interest in and research on indigenous South American languages and cultures. Materials attributed to Mason include a bibliography composed of about 300 cards primarily on South American languages, including many entries not in the Handbook of South American Indians; a notebook of observations on the distribution, relationships, etc., of South American languages; a file with correspondence, bibliography, draft of introduction, etc., relating to his contribution to the Handbook of South American Indians; a 166-page essay on the preconquest history and culture of the Andean region (mostly Peru) through the medium of artifacts preserved in the University Museum (University of Pennsylvania); two copies of Mason's "Andean Civilization," including bibliography, for the Encyclopedia Britannica (1960); two copies of the preface to the Spanish edition of "Ancient Civilizations of Peru," with a memorandum from Alfred Kidder II to Mason regarding recent developments in Central Andean archaeology; an incomplete essay titled "Status and problems of research in the Native Languages of South America," primarily concerned with historical linguistics and genetic relationship; and a file of notes on genetic relationships, subgrouping, etc., from published sources or giving his own impressions: Kamakan, Choroti, Ashluslay Kaduveo, Mataco; Malali, Mashakal, Ge, Vejoz, Coropo, Motilon, Towothl, Kaingang, Subtiaba, Hokan, Coroado, etc.. Unattributed materials (most likely Mason's) include circa 2,000 cards of notes on South American linguistic and ethnology focused on genetic classification of South American languages; circa 4,000 cards of notes regarding South American languages and dialects and their geographical distribution, etc.; and 17 pages of notes concerning a letter (included) from Harry B. Wright to Captain Colon Eloy Alfaro proposing that expeditions be sent to Ecuadorean Oriente for study in linguistics, ethnology, etc. Materials attributed to others than Mason include two essays or drafts by John Peabody Harrington on the affiliation of Witoto [Huitoto, probably Murui Huitoto but possibly Nüpode Huitoto], Miranya [aka Miraña or Miranha, now known as Bora] and Guaranian/Tupi-Guarani [Guarani, represented by Cocama], one with Mason's comments; 27 pages of Kagaba [Kogi] texts with interlinear Spanish translation and lists of animals, plants, body parts, natural phenomena, kinship terms, etc., with Spanish and English glosses; and Eugenio Garro's "Geographical distribution of the Native languages and dialects of Peru," an article submitted for the Handbook of South American Indians (marked "not printed in Handbook"). Correspondence includes Mason's Handbook of South American Indians correspondence, with Zellig S. Harris, Harry Hoijer, Eugene A. Nida, et al., soliciting contributions to the handbook, etc.; letters from Claude Levi-Strauss regarding locations, languages, and dialects of indigenous peoples of Brazil (mentions Parintintin [Kagwahiva], Rama-Rama [Rama], Tupi, Nambikuara [Southern Nambikuára], Tupi-Kawahib [Kawahiva?], Kabixiana [Kabixí], Kep-kiri-uat [?]); correspondence with John Peabody Harrington concerning Harrington's work for Mason on the Handbook of South American Indians; correspondence with Willard Z. Park regarding Park's ethnological work among the Kagaba [Kogi] in Colombia; correspondence with Louis Rankin regarding the Cocama, Cocamilla [the dialects of what is now called Cocama-Cocamilla], Chama [Ese Ejja], Campa [Ajyíninka Apurucayali?], and Amuesha [Yanesha'] languages of Peru; correspondence with David B. Stout regarding Stout's genetic classification of Chibchan, Kuna, and Choco, with one page of Mason's opinions on Stout's classification; correspondence with John Howland Rowe regarding South American languages and cultures, including the Quechua, Aymara, and Millcayac languages, early work of Max Uhle in Peru, Bolivia, etc.. and mentioning Alfred V. Kidder, Alfred L. Kroeber, and others; and a letter from Otis H. Green regarding the origin of the word "jivaro."
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Aymara | Ayoreo | Baniwa | Kanamari | Kayapo | Kaingang | Kraho | Macushi | Maroon | Maruba | Piaroa | Quechua | Ticuna | Tiriyó | Xavante | Wapishana | Wayana | Yanomami | Ye'kuana
Alternate forms: Tucuna, Yanomamo
Language(s): English
Date: 1962-1978
Extent: 4 linear feet (estimate)
Description: The South American materials in the James V. Neel papers consists materials related to Neel's genetics and populations studies among some indigenous people in Brazil, Venezuela, and Guyana. The bulk of these materials concern the Xavante and Yanomami peoples, written as "Yanomamo" by Neel. These materials can be found throughout most sections of the finding aid, though see especially "Series IIa: Amerindian" and "Series IIIa: Amerindian." In addition to data, reports, correspondence, and other manuscripts, "Series X: Photographic materials" contains numerous photographs of Xavante and Yanomami peoples from the 1960s. Materials on other indigenous groups can be located by searching within the finding aid for the culture terms listed above in the entry or by searching for the term "Indians."
Collection: James V. Neel Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.96)