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Language(s): English
Date: 1791; 1819
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Letter to Sir Joseph Banks, comments on the ironic fate of American Indians, doomed to extinction. Mentions Indian warfare. Letter to John Vaughan, asks for books concerning Indians in the U.S. for William Vaughan. Refers to Benjamin Smith Barton as authority on the Indian. Mentions Indian policy of Jefferson and Madison. Expresses curiosity about sign language as discussed in Dunbar (1809). Includes quotation of William Vaughan to Benjamin Vaughan, November 17 (1815?), asking for information on the propagation of the Gospel among the Indians of Massachusetts and New England.
Collection: Benjamin Vaughan Papers (Mss.B.V46p)

Nez Perce
Language(s): English | Nez Perce
Date: 1891-1938; 1966
Extent: 1 reel
Description: This collection of materials on American Sign language is based on the work of Presbyterian missionaries in Idaho in the nineteenth century. Includes a Nez Perce hymnal; discussion and illustrations on the meaning of symbols and on the use of sign seven published works; miscellaneous clippings; photographs; and correspondence of sisters Mary and Elizabeth Crawford. The published works include the history of the Idaho mission and sign language translations by Mr. Levi W. Jonas (native Nez Perce superintendent of the Kamiah church) and In-go-nom-pa-shi. Includes over 1,500 sign language hand symbols of the Nez Perce language with thirty portraits of missionaries and Nez Perce Indians of Idaho from 1891-1938. Illustrations from different published works such as Gospel hymns in the Nez Perce language (1897); The Sign language and the invention of Mr. Lewis F. Hadley (Chicago, 1891); and Sign language; talk by In-go-nom-pa-shi. Also, clippings from various Presbyterian publications. From materials in possession of Miss Jean Rumsey.
Collection: American Sign language, 1891-1938 (Mss.Film.1226)

Ho-Chunk | Shoshone | Crow | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | A'aninin
Alternate forms: Winnebago, Shoshoni, Kansa, Sioux, Minnetaree, Gros Ventre
Language(s): English
Date: 1806-1892
Type:Text
Extent: 7 items
Description: Correspondence regarding Plains Indian materials. Includes Thomas Jefferson's letter to John Vaughan transmitting a copy of his "communications to Congress of the information respecting Louisiana..." [Jefferson (1806)]; Du Ponceau's request for a copy of the first two pages of Journal historique from original in Department of State; Du Ponceau to Johann S. Vater concerning Indian vocabularies brought in by Major Long, which are being copied into his book, where he now has 25 vocabularies (notes that Long lost others when baggage men deserted to the Indians); John C. Calhoun's instructions for Long's Missouri expedition (Long urged to pacify and conciliate Indians, get information as to their number and character, fill in vocabulary forms, and follow Jefferson's instructions to Lewis [Printed (in part), James (1823): 3-5]; Ferdinand V. Hayden's observations on the Indian history of the Colorado region, including use of stone arrow points by the Pawnees, earth huts of Indians along Missouri River, use of stone implements, and his belief that Digger Indians of Nevada are most degraded [Printed, Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 10: 352-353]; Daniel G. Brinton's letter to Henry Phillips desiring a copy of Hayden's article on Missouri Tribes for Horatio Hale; and Rev. T.W. Smith's inquiry about a paper on Sign language [See also Dunbar (1809)]. Other Native American groups mentioned include Winnebago, Shoshoni, Upsaroko or Crow, Wahtoktatas, Kanzas, Omahas, Yankton Sioux, Pawnee (Panis), Minnetaree (Gros Ventre), and Sioux.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Quileute
Language(s): English | Quileute
Date: 1908-1933
Extent: 817 loose pages; 21 notebooks; approx. 4,800 word slips; 1 map
Description: The Quileute collection in the ACLS collection consists of a large body of materials located primarily in the "Quileute" section of the finding aid. These materials were recorded primarily by Albert Reagan, Leo Frachtenberg, and Manuel Andrade. Reagan was an Indian agent and teacher at the Quileute Day School. His materials, dated from 1908-1913, primarily include drawing made by students at the Quileute Day School. These images include pencil and ink sketches, color crayon drawings, watercolors, and geletin silver prints of utensils, canoes, drums, rattles, toys, arrows, masks, totems, and decorative patterns. Frachtenberg's materials date from roughtly 1915 to 1922 and contain detailed ethnographic and linguistic information, split up into several different listed items. Andrade's work followed shortly after Frachtenberg and concerns primiarily linguistic information and additional stories. Arthur Howeattle is a prominent Quileute consultant for some of these items. Some additional materials comparing the Quileute and Chemakum languages can be found in the "Chemakum" section of the finding aid, as well as comparisons of Quileute and Nuu-chah-nulth in the "Nootka" section of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)