Displaying 71 - 80 of 1975
Apache | Arapaho | Cheyenne | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Cree | Dakota | Delaware | Kiowa | Ojibwe | Pojoaque | Santa Clara | Shawnee | Tohono O'odham | Wichita | Zuni
Alternate forms: Sioux, Papago, Pueblo, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1870-1934
Extent: 5 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Of particular interest might be Folder "A:9770-1-118 Indians from Oklahoma (Work Sent in by Mr. Paul Roofe)" (1926), containing 118 pages of Individual Analysis Cards containing personal and family information about students at the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. There is also "Folder A:9770 #1. Indian Photographs, Bureau of American Ethnography" (1870-1912), containing 23 photographs of Native individuals, all men, most with both front and profile shots, and identifying information on the back. Cultures represented include Kiowa, Brule (Dakota), Apache, Delaware, Papago (Tohono O'odham), Arapaho, Wichita, Zuni, Santa Clara (Pueblo), Shawnee, Pojoaque (Pueblo), Cheyenne, and Bannock. Folder "A:9770 #3. American Indians" (1920-1934) contains material about Bolivia Indians, Chippewas (Ojibwe) in Michigan, and from Dr. Margaret W. Koenig of the Nebraska Medical Women's League regarding the family history of Permela Palmer (Chicksaw), who married a Choctaw and then a white man, and who was of particular note because of her supernumerary mammary glands and the similarly abnormal breast development of some of her daughters. Folder "A:974 x 7. Caucasian x Indian" (1920-1925) contains trait charts of mixed families, including charts of a French-Cree and Choctaw family and a French-Cree and Scotch-Cree family sent by Mrs. L. M. William of Battleford, Sask.; a three-page typed essay, "For a Universial Marriage Law," advocating the prohibition of mixed marriages, also attributed to Mrs. William; and a magazine article, intended to be humorous, titled "Indian Wives and White Husbands" by Josiah M. Ward. Folder "A:976 x 70. American Indian - Negro" (1919-1928) contains charts, anecdotal data, notes, etc. regarding the traits of mixed children of Native and African American parents, several examples of which are stamped State Normal School, Montclair, NJ; a letter from the state registrar of Virginia to the Census Bureau concerning the efforts of people trying to gain recogition as Chickahominy, Rappahannock, and other groups despite having been previously been designated as "mullatoes," fear about such people having "broken into the census as Indians," and from there "have gotten across into the white race," and hopes to clarify matters for the 1930 Censuses; and materials (interviews, family trees, forms, notes) from a study directed by A. H. Estabrook and I. E. McDougle of the Sociology Department of Sweet Briar College--with fieldwork (such as interviews) performed by Sweet Briar students--titled "The Isshys, An Indian-Negro-White Family Group Near Amherest, Virginia."
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Amuzgo
Alternate forms: Amochco, Tzañcue
Language(s): Spanish | Amuzgo, Ipalapa
Date: 1923, 1939
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 544 pages
Description: The Amuzgo materials in the ACLS collection consists of two items. In the “Mexico” section of the finding aid, see “Comparative vocabularies of various Indian languages of Mexico,” which includes Amuzgo vocabulary. In the “Zapotec” section of the finding aid, see de Angulo's “Estudio gramatical de las lenguas de la familia zapoteca,” which includes Amuzgo information and ten ink sketches of maps showing linguistic groups. These materials may utilize data from Francisco Belmar's "Investigación sobre el idioma amuzgo" from 1901.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1946
Subject: Anthropology
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume, 150 p.
Description: Duplicate of copy deposited with Benedict papers, Vassar College, of correspondence published in Mead (1959). Arrangement is different from that of published version, and correspondence with Edward Sapir is lacking. More letters, fuller texts, fuller identification of references in this version, however. Includes correspondence of Ruth Benedict and Franz Boas, Margaret Mead. Letters of Mead and Reo F. Fortune. Some letters from Boas correspondence, Franz Boas Collection (Mss.B.B61).
Collection: An Anthropologist at work: writings of Ruth Benedict, by Margaret Mead (Mss.B.B428.mx)

Aztec
Language(s): English
Date: 1790-1806, 1818
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume, 106 p.
Description: William E. Hulings' translation of Leon y Gama's "Descripcion Histórica y Cronológica de las dos Piedras" (1792), together with a query of William E. Hulings on the possible relation of the Aztecs to the Mound Builders. The volume describes and translates a monument and a calendar stone; it also presents ethnologic information, particularly regarding mythology. The volume is divided into three sections with separate pagination: "An historical and chronological description of two stones found under ground, in the great square of the City of Mexico, in the years 1790" (84 p.), "Notes to Antonio de Leon y Gama's Work" (19 p.), and "Translated from the Diary of Mexico, for Augt. 5th 1806" (3 p.).
Collection: An historical and chronological description of two stones found under ground, in the great square of the City of Mexico, in the years 1790 [translation] (Mss.913.72.L55)

Language(s): English
Date: 1800; 1830
Subject: Medicine
Type:Text
Extent: 34 pages
Description: This volume contains a manuscript copy of Robert Eveleigh Taylor's dissertation, titled “An inaugural disputation, concerning the varieties of the human race.” Taylor delivered this lecture at the University of Edinburgh in July 1800 to fulfill one of the requirements for a medical degree. The essay touches on many of the prominent theories about racial differences then circulating in the Atlantic World. Taylor, for instance, discusses the influence of climate on the different races and how geography affects the health. It was originally published in Latin (Edinburgh, 1800), and John Brandreth made this English translation for a friend in 1830.
Collection: An inaugural disputation, concerning the varieties of the human race, July 1800, 1830 (Mss.572.2.T2li.b)

Anishinaabe | Blackfoot | Cree | Dakota | Métis | Kainai | Nakoda | Ojibwe | Secwepemc
Alternate forms: Blood, Ojibwa, Saulteaux, Shuswap, Simpcw, Sioux, Stoney
Language(s): English
Date: 1905-1910
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: Norman Leonard Jacobs was an engineer and surveyor with the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway in Canada. The collection consists of his correspondence with Bessie Frank (later Anathan), an acquaintance from Pittsburgh. Jacobs wrote of daily life in Canadian cities like Winnipeg and Edmonton, interactions with First Nations, and daily hardships encountered in the field (extreme cold, snowblindness, and lack of food), but also spoke of his work with pride and enthusiasm. In addition to the letters, Jacobs wrote twenty-eight pages of a "Diary of a Tenderfoot." Also included in the collection are two photobooks and various loose photographs, which display various aspects of camp life, details of work sites and the Canadian landscape, and First Nations peoples. Some of the photographs are extremely faded. Native peoples mentioned include Ojibwe, Blackfoot, Cree, "Surteau" (likely Saulteaux),"Bloods" (Kainai), "Stonies" (Nakoda, or "Stoney"), as well as Native people at Tete Jaune Cache who are likely Simpcw. The images include family groups; men, women, and children fishing; men (some apparently hired by Jacobs or his company to act as guides and carriers in the field) working with an infant in a cradleboard; Ojibwe graves; tepees [tipis]; "Sioux" warriors; a sweat bath; horse races; individuals like Joe KaeKwitch, Chief Handorgan, Chief Wingard, Muskowken, etc. Most of these materials have been digitized and are available through the APS's Digital Library. Also see the finding aid for more background information on Jacobs and detailed itemized lists for both Series I. Correspondence and Series II. Graphic Materials.
Collection: Anathan-Jacobs Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Collection (Mss.SMs.Coll.13)

Mixtec
Language(s): English | Mixtec
Date: 1940
Contributor: Wilbur, Walter K.
Extent: 220 pages
Description: This typescript with hand-colored plates is an analysis of the material culture of one of the eight extant Mixtec codices, Codex Vindobonensis I. This codex is known by several names, including Codex Constantinopolitanus, Codex Byzantinus, and Codex Mexicanus I. The last name is more often used in the present day. The original is housed at the Austrian National Library at Vienna. Includes over three hundred vividly colored pictographs and phonetic signs of the Mixtec language. Repainted by the author, the watercolors exhibit pottery, ornaments, weapons, and ceremonial paraphernalia. Some of these images have been digitized and are available through the APS Digital Library.
Collection: Ancient Mexican material culture as revealed in Codex Vindobonensis Mexicanus, 1940 (Mss.913.72.Wi649)

Language(s): English
Date: 1822-1825
Type:Text
Genre: Microfilms | Notes | Maps
Extent: circa 250 pages
Description: A rough miscellany about antiquities in North and South America, as well as Europe and Asia, taken from published sources and personal observation. Contains a classification of antiquities, and descriptions of ancient monuments of Europe. Includes the author's "Ancient geography..." manuscript. Also includes maps and figures. Copy of original owned by the University Museum, University of Pennsylvania. See also Rafinesque (1838).
Collection: Ancient monuments of North and South America, 1822-1825 (Mss.Film.32)

Anishinaabe | Ottawa
Alternate forms: Odawa
Language(s): English | Ottawa
Date: 1947-1948, 2000
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Transcriptions and interlinear English translations by Howard Webkamigad of 13 Odawa (Anishinaabe) stories, 1 Odawa (annishinaabe) conversation, and 1 English story (transcription only), from wire recordings in Mss.Rec.1, "Ottawa material, 1947-1948."
Collection: Anishinaabe Language Tape Transcriptions of Anishinaabe Language Recordings by anishinaabe People from the Traverse Area of Michigan During the 1940s (Mss.SMs.Coll.20)

Apache, Chiricahua | Apache, Kiowa | Apache, Lipan | Apache, Jicarilla | Apache, Western
Alternate forms: Apache, San Carlos, Apache, Plains
Date: 1903-1911, 1920
Type:Text
Extent: circa 512 cards, and 2 notebooks
Description: The Apache materials in the ACLS collection consist of 3 items. Two are found in the "Apache" section of the finding aid. These are an "Apache (Chiricahua, Lipan, and Jicarilla) morphological lexicon" by an unidentified author (possibly Harry Hoijer), with arranged in tables, with conjugations of all prefixes (aspectual and pronominal) and combinations thereof; and a "San Carlos Apache Lexical File" compiled by Goddard. In the "Athapaskan" section of the finding aid, see "Field notes in California Athabascan languages," which contains 2 notebooks of Kiowa Apache materials (including text, discussion of warfare; list of specimens and cost.)
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)