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Anishinaabe | Ho-Chunk | Kiowa | Menominee | Meskwaki | Miami | Narragansett | Ojibwe | Odawa | Potawatomi | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Fox, Menomini, Odawa, Ojibwa, Sauk, Winnebago
Language(s): English
Date: 1953-1967
Extent: 9 sound tape reels (9 hr., 55 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: The first section (Series I) of this recording collection consists of 13 episodes of the radio program "Red Man in Michigan," broadcast on WUOM radio in Ann Arbor, Michigan. These programs use extensive clips from field recordings made by Gertrude Prokosch Kurath, and cover a wide range of historical and contemporary topics directed to a general non-Native audience. Series II consists of tapes including Ottawa language hymns from a series of programs titled "Comparisons of Chippewa Revival Hymns, Michigan and Ontario, 1953-1962"; interviews on the organization of United Church, on the organization of Camp Meetings, on missionary experiences, especially at Perry Island and Moose Point, Ontario; recordings of powwows at Ann Arbor, Lansing, and Hastings, including some Kiowa performances by John Bosin; an interview with Jim Eagle Shaffer; and an interview with Anna Fulton, Douglas Fulton, and Bruce Fulton on socio-economic conditions and racial discrimination against Native people in Michigan. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Observations on Michigan Indians (Mss.Rec.63)

Tuscarora | Seneca | Dakota | Haudenosaunee | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Miami | Otomi | Powhatan | Mohawk | Natchez | San Felipe | Nottoway | Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Winnebago, Sioux, Keres
Language(s): English
Date: 1801-1843
Type:Text
Extent: 33 items
Description: Correspondence, largely from Peter S. du Ponceau to Albert Gallatin, regarding legal and political matters, Indian languages and linguistics, philological matters, and the American Philosophical Society. Specific topics include exchanges of publications and manuscripts between the two men; the creation of a map of Indian languages; the government's collecting of Indian vocabularies and du Ponceau's refusal to supply Historical and Literary Committee material to the government, believing that the committee rather than the government should undertake the collection and publication of Indian materials; methods of seeking data on languages, and the difficulties of sentence for testing problems of comparative Vocabularies;s both already published and in progess, such as Eliot's Grammar, Barton (1797), Pickering (1820), Hodgson on the Berber, Najera (1837), Zeisberger (1830), Gallatin (1836), Prichard (1813), several of du Ponceau's works, etc.; du Ponceau's acceptance of copies of Gallatin's Synopsis, with a jab at its Worcester (rather than APS) the fate of the manuscript for du Ponceau's prize essay: the printer bankrupt, difficulties in getting manuscript returned, and du Ponceau has no full copy; of du Ponceau's study of Chinese;s and the Transactions of the Historical and Literary Committee; du Ponceau's acceptance of vocabularies on behalf of the the state of European linguistics; Pickering's alphabet for Indian languages; Carib women's vs. men's the opposition founding of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, and du Ponceau's efforts to make peace by submitting his translation of Vater's Enquiry for them to publish; illnesses and deaths in du Ponceau's family; and du Ponceau's age, health, and failing eyesight. Other individuals mentioned include Franklin, Rush, Rittenhouse, Jefferson, Cass, Schoolcraft, Long, Ebeling, Adelung, Klaproth, Balbi, Humboldt, Volney, and Heckewelder. Originals at the New York Historical Society.
Collection: Peter Stephen Du Ponceau letters, 1801-1843, to Albert Gallatin (Mss.Film.541)