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Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Potawatomi | Ho-Chunk | Meskwaki | Dakota | Menominee | Stockbridge-Munsee | Oneida | Iowa
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa, Winnebago, Sac, Sauk, Fox, Sioux, Chiwere, Ioway
Language(s): English
Date: 1835-1838
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: Letters discussing grave robbing of Indigenous ancestors' remains and observations of contemporary Native people. Houghton has been among Winnebago, Sacs, Foxes, and Sioux; can get Pottawatomi, Winnebago, and Chippewa skulls, but to get to know personages may take longer; Pitcher is sending sketch to go with a skull. Dr. Wheaton, evidently an army surgeon, spent 1822-1827 at Sault Ste. Marie, then at Mackinaw and Green Bay; consumption infrequent among soldiers, French residents, and Indians, which he attributes to the dry cold climate there; recommends such as treatment for sufferers. Pitcher resigned his Army job for private practice and to assist in forming the medical department of the new University of Michigan. He will send Chippewa skulls to help Morton "build up something like an American Golgotha." Schoolcraft advises Morton to come to Mackinac for treaty payments, where he can see Indians, and suggests a route he can take west to see more Indians. Mentions Chippewa, Menominee, Winnebagos, Stockbridge (Mohegan), Brothertowns, Oneidas, Sioux, Iowa, Sac and Fox Indians.
Collection: Samuel George Morton Papers (Mss.B.M843)

Tuscarora | Seneca | Dakota | Haudenosaunee | Ojibwe | Shawnee | Miami | Otomi | Powhatan | Mohawk | Natchez | San Felipe | Nottoway | Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa, Winnebago, Sioux, Keres
Language(s): English
Date: 1801-1843
Type:Text
Extent: 33 items
Description: Correspondence, largely from Peter S. du Ponceau to Albert Gallatin, regarding legal and political matters, Indian languages and linguistics, philological matters, and the American Philosophical Society. Specific topics include exchanges of publications and manuscripts between the two men; the creation of a map of Indian languages; the government's collecting of Indian vocabularies and du Ponceau's refusal to supply Historical and Literary Committee material to the government, believing that the committee rather than the government should undertake the collection and publication of Indian materials; methods of seeking data on languages, and the difficulties of sentence for testing problems of comparative Vocabularies;s both already published and in progess, such as Eliot's Grammar, Barton (1797), Pickering (1820), Hodgson on the Berber, Najera (1837), Zeisberger (1830), Gallatin (1836), Prichard (1813), several of du Ponceau's works, etc.; du Ponceau's acceptance of copies of Gallatin's Synopsis, with a jab at its Worcester (rather than APS) the fate of the manuscript for du Ponceau's prize essay: the printer bankrupt, difficulties in getting manuscript returned, and du Ponceau has no full copy; of du Ponceau's study of Chinese;s and the Transactions of the Historical and Literary Committee; du Ponceau's acceptance of vocabularies on behalf of the the state of European linguistics; Pickering's alphabet for Indian languages; Carib women's vs. men's the opposition founding of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, and du Ponceau's efforts to make peace by submitting his translation of Vater's Enquiry for them to publish; illnesses and deaths in du Ponceau's family; and du Ponceau's age, health, and failing eyesight. Other individuals mentioned include Franklin, Rush, Rittenhouse, Jefferson, Cass, Schoolcraft, Long, Ebeling, Adelung, Klaproth, Balbi, Humboldt, Volney, and Heckewelder. Originals at the New York Historical Society.
Collection: Peter Stephen Du Ponceau letters, 1801-1843, to Albert Gallatin (Mss.Film.541)

Ho-Chunk | Shoshone | Crow | Kaw | Omaha | Dakota | Pawnee | A'aninin
Alternate forms: Winnebago, Shoshoni, Kansa, Sioux, Minnetaree, Gros Ventre
Language(s): English
Date: 1806-1892
Type:Text
Extent: 7 items
Description: Correspondence regarding Plains Indian materials. Includes Thomas Jefferson's letter to John Vaughan transmitting a copy of his "communications to Congress of the information respecting Louisiana..." [Jefferson (1806)]; Du Ponceau's request for a copy of the first two pages of Journal historique from original in Department of State; Du Ponceau to Johann S. Vater concerning Indian vocabularies brought in by Major Long, which are being copied into his book, where he now has 25 vocabularies (notes that Long lost others when baggage men deserted to the Indians); John C. Calhoun's instructions for Long's Missouri expedition (Long urged to pacify and conciliate Indians, get information as to their number and character, fill in vocabulary forms, and follow Jefferson's instructions to Lewis [Printed (in part), James (1823): 3-5]; Ferdinand V. Hayden's observations on the Indian history of the Colorado region, including use of stone arrow points by the Pawnees, earth huts of Indians along Missouri River, use of stone implements, and his belief that Digger Indians of Nevada are most degraded [Printed, Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 10: 352-353]; Daniel G. Brinton's letter to Henry Phillips desiring a copy of Hayden's article on Missouri Tribes for Horatio Hale; and Rev. T.W. Smith's inquiry about a paper on Sign language [See also Dunbar (1809)]. Other Native American groups mentioned include Winnebago, Shoshoni, Upsaroko or Crow, Wahtoktatas, Kanzas, Omahas, Yankton Sioux, Pawnee (Panis), Minnetaree (Gros Ventre), and Sioux.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)