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Cubeo
Language(s): English
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Genre: Notes
Extent: 1 page
Description: Recitative. Naming of child, Cubeo Indians, southeast Colombia.
Collection: Paul Radin papers (Mss.497.3.R114)

Guna
Alternate forms: Cuna, Kuna
Language(s): English | Kuna, San Blas
Date: June 10, 1824
Type:Text
Extent: 2 pages
Description: Letter to John Vaughan in which he transmits a vocabulary of Darien Indians. Acknowledged by Vaughan in letter to Salazer, June 18, 1824.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Guna
Alternate forms: Cuna, Kuna
Language(s): English
Date: 1924-1925
Extent: 2 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Kuna (formerly Cuna) materials include thirty-seven black and white 3 ¼" square silver gelatin photographs of the so-called "White Indians of Panama" located in Series I. Trait Files, Box $65, Folder "A:9861. White Indians - San Blas Coast" (1924-1925). As detailed in the accompanying World's Work article "Blond Indians of the Darien Jungle," Richard Olgesby Marsh photographed Kuna albinos in their village in 1924, and also encountered albinos among the indigenous peoples of mainland Panama. References to "White Indians" and "Albino Indians of Panama" also refer to the Kuna, who live in the San Blas Islands off the coast of Panama and who have the highest rate of albinism of any ethnic community in the world. Before geneticists discovered the DNA chromosome responsible, Marsh believed that the Kuna were descended from Vikings who arrived in the Americas before Columbus, and convinced the U.S. government to pressure Panama to set up the current autonomous governing structure of the Kuna. Folder "A:97728. Central America" (1925), also in Box #65, contains a list of seven individuals titled "Skin Color...San Blas Indians."
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Kogi | Guna
Alternate forms: Cuna, Kagaba, Kuna
Language(s): English
Date: June 2, 1947
Type:Text
Extent: 1 page
Description: In the Subcollection I, Series II section of the collection guide, see "Holmer, Nils" for correspondence. Letter to Speck regarding author's visits to Kagaba [Kogi] peoples of Sierra Nevada, Colombia. Mentions Guna people. Comments on being in Panama City, and trying to contact representatives of the tribe.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Quechua | Cocama | Tohono O'odham | Akimel O'odham | Cocama
Alternate forms: Papago, Pima
Date: 1941-1948
Type:Text
Extent: 4 items
Description: Materials relating to Quechua language and culture. Includes John Peabody Harrington's correspondence with John Alden Mason regarding Harrington's work on the Hokan nature of Quechua and on Pima-Papago [Tohono O'odham, and possibly Akimel O'odham]; Harrington's "The nominal derivational suffixes of Quechua" with a list of the suffixes with examples, a brief discussion by Harrington, and Mason's comments; Harrington's "Adjective derivational suffixes of Quechua," a listing of suffixes with brief comments and one slip of Mason's comments; and Harrington and Luis Valcárcel's "Grammarlets of the Quechua and Cocama languages," with grammatical sketch of Quechua and a very brief sketch of Cocama [Cocama-Cocamilla].
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Arawak
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1925-1967
Type:Text
Extent: 12 folders
Description: There are many items relating to South American languages in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for materials that cover South American languages in general and might not show up in narrower searches. Researchers should also view the entries for specific languages (i.e., Quechua, etc.). In Subcollection I, there is relevant correspondence with John H. Rowe and William L. Wonderly in Series I. Correspondence; a bibliography for sources on Arawakan languages placed unexpectedly at the end of Ojibwa Folder #4 in Series II. "Ethnological Research Opportunities in Colombia," "Living Language Families," and "Peopling of the New World (South America After North America)" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III-B: Works Authored by Voegelin; George P. Murdock's "Maps for South America" (Arranged by Florence Robinett from "Outline of South American Culture"), M. Catherine Peeke's "Divisive Criteria for Auca World Classes," and William L. Wonderly's "List of Central American Indian Languages" in Series IV. Works by Others; a file on "Amazon Indian Languages" (containing typed classifications of languages of the Amazon, Putomayo, and Caqueta regions of Brazil, with population numbers) and folder on South American and Other Latin American Languages (which includes Central America and Mexico and contains a list of languages and notes on some of them) in file in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A: Language Notes [see also the associated material in Oversized]; and a map of "South America and other Latin American languages" in Series VII. Photographs.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Tupi | Rama | Quechua | Guarani | Cocama | Kogi | Chibcha | Guna | Aymara | Kawahiva | Ese Ejja | Yanesha' | Inca
Alternate forms: Kuna
Date: 1937-1960 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 23 items
Description: Materials relating to John Alden Mason's interest in and research on indigenous South American languages and cultures. Materials attributed to Mason include a bibliography composed of about 300 cards primarily on South American languages, including many entries not in the Handbook of South American Indians; a notebook of observations on the distribution, relationships, etc., of South American languages; a file with correspondence, bibliography, draft of introduction, etc., relating to his contribution to the Handbook of South American Indians; a 166-page essay on the preconquest history and culture of the Andean region (mostly Peru) through the medium of artifacts preserved in the University Museum (University of Pennsylvania); two copies of Mason's "Andean Civilization," including bibliography, for the Encyclopedia Britannica (1960); two copies of the preface to the Spanish edition of "Ancient Civilizations of Peru," with a memorandum from Alfred Kidder II to Mason regarding recent developments in Central Andean archaeology; an incomplete essay titled "Status and problems of research in the Native Languages of South America," primarily concerned with historical linguistics and genetic relationship; and a file of notes on genetic relationships, subgrouping, etc., from published sources or giving his own impressions: Kamakan, Choroti, Ashluslay Kaduveo, Mataco; Malali, Mashakal, Ge, Vejoz, Coropo, Motilon, Towothl, Kaingang, Subtiaba, Hokan, Coroado, etc.. Unattributed materials (most likely Mason's) include circa 2,000 cards of notes on South American linguistic and ethnology focused on genetic classification of South American languages; circa 4,000 cards of notes regarding South American languages and dialects and their geographical distribution, etc.; and 17 pages of notes concerning a letter (included) from Harry B. Wright to Captain Colon Eloy Alfaro proposing that expeditions be sent to Ecuadorean Oriente for study in linguistics, ethnology, etc. Materials attributed to others than Mason include two essays or drafts by John Peabody Harrington on the affiliation of Witoto [Huitoto, probably Murui Huitoto but possibly Nüpode Huitoto], Miranya [aka Miraña or Miranha, now known as Bora] and Guaranian/Tupi-Guarani [Guarani, represented by Cocama], one with Mason's comments; 27 pages of Kagaba [Kogi] texts with interlinear Spanish translation and lists of animals, plants, body parts, natural phenomena, kinship terms, etc., with Spanish and English glosses; and Eugenio Garro's "Geographical distribution of the Native languages and dialects of Peru," an article submitted for the Handbook of South American Indians (marked "not printed in Handbook"). Correspondence includes Mason's Handbook of South American Indians correspondence, with Zellig S. Harris, Harry Hoijer, Eugene A. Nida, et al., soliciting contributions to the handbook, etc.; letters from Claude Levi-Strauss regarding locations, languages, and dialects of indigenous peoples of Brazil (mentions Parintintin [Kagwahiva], Rama-Rama [Rama], Tupi, Nambikuara [Southern Nambikuára], Tupi-Kawahib [Kawahiva?], Kabixiana [Kabixí], Kep-kiri-uat [?]); correspondence with John Peabody Harrington concerning Harrington's work for Mason on the Handbook of South American Indians; correspondence with Willard Z. Park regarding Park's ethnological work among the Kagaba [Kogi] in Colombia; correspondence with Louis Rankin regarding the Cocama, Cocamilla [the dialects of what is now called Cocama-Cocamilla], Chama [Ese Ejja], Campa [Ajyíninka Apurucayali?], and Amuesha [Yanesha'] languages of Peru; correspondence with David B. Stout regarding Stout's genetic classification of Chibchan, Kuna, and Choco, with one page of Mason's opinions on Stout's classification; correspondence with John Howland Rowe regarding South American languages and cultures, including the Quechua, Aymara, and Millcayac languages, early work of Max Uhle in Peru, Bolivia, etc.. and mentioning Alfred V. Kidder, Alfred L. Kroeber, and others; and a letter from Otis H. Green regarding the origin of the word "jivaro."
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Chocó | Cholón | Paparo | Tucura | Guna
Alternate forms: Kuna
Language(s): English
Date: 1937
Type:Text
Genre: Journals
Extent: 1 volume
Description: "Choco expedition." Primarily concerned with collection of water samples from the Pacific, meteorological data, etc. Some notes and discussion of Indians of Colombia and Ecuador. Groups and places mentioned: Choco, Citara, Noanama, Cholo, Paparo, Tucura, and Kuna.
Collection: Robert Cushman Murphy journals (Mss.B.M957)