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Inuit | Inuvialuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Date: 1968
Extent: 11 sound tape reels (2 hr., 4 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Field recordings of Inuit languages recorded in 1968 in Eskimo Point, Baker Lake, Coppermine, Cambridge Bay, Baffin Island, and Rankin Inlet. The language consultants include Tom Kalanyek (Inuvik), Edward Felix (Tuktoyaktuk), Naomi Niptnatiak (Kugluktuk), Doris Kekpak (Cambridge Bay), Thomas Angutitchauk (Gjoa Haven), Jimmy Gibbons (Repulse Bay, resident of Arviat), Hugh Ungunga (also named Tapatai?) (Baker Lake), Phillip Sheetoga (Rankin Inlet), David Uvingayak and Thomas Katlak (Arviat), Rebecca Kitsualik (Pond Inlet, resident of Gjoa Haven), Martha Adams (Kuujjuaq, resident of Rankin Inlet).  (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Canadian Eskimo Dialects (Mss.Rec.74)

Kumeyaay
Alternate forms: Kumeyaay, Diegueño, Kamia, Tipai-Ipai
Language(s): English | Kumiai
Date: 1963-1964
Extent: 3 sound tape reels (6 hr., 34 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Field recordings made with Kumiai / Kumeyaay (Diegueño) speakers from numerous communities in San Diego County, California, and Sonora, Mexico. Primarily consists of traditional stories, including Coyote stories. Also includes Vocabularies, conversations, description of the preparation of acorns for food, identification of museum artifacts, and an extended account of the Mission Indian Federation. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Diegueño texts (Mss.Rec.76)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Aivilik, Eskimo, Inuk, Inuttitut, Nunatsiavut
Date: 1883-1929
Extent: 184 pages; 2900 slips; 18 drawings
Description: The Inuit materials in the ACLS collection consists of several items in the "Eskimo" section of the finding aid. The core materials are Boas' fieldwork materials from Baffinland in 1883, his first fieldwork trip. "Eskimo ethnographic notes from Baffinland" includes vocabulary, texts, and ethnographic notes. "Eskimo texts" includes several text written in syllabic script, and includes other texts as well, some with interlinear translations, and additional vocabulary lists. This material comes from Hamilton Inlet (Labrador), Hudson Bay, and Cumberland Sound. "Eskimo interlinear texts" includes brief additional texts. Boas' "Eskimo lexicon" consists of an extensive German-Inuit vocabulary file of over 2900 slips. Boas' "Eskimo Songs" consists of song texts with translations. Lastly, "Eskimo folklore" consists of materials on stories, customs, and cooking and building methods, sent to Boas by George Comer, largely from the Southampton Island and Repulse Bay region. A table of content of the Comer materials is available upon request.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Language(s): English | German | Kwak'wala
Date: 1893-1951
Extent: Approx. 10,000 loose pages, 10 notebooks, 7000+ cards, 10+ maps
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the ACLS collection are located predominantly in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all materials. Some of the larger individaul sets of materials listed within this section also have their own specific tables of contents (available upon request) detailing their often highly diverse contents. Overall, the vast majority of the material is made of of 1) manuscripts sent to Boas by George Hunt from the 1890s to the 1930s, frequently in both Kwak'wala and English, covering a very broad range of Kwakwaka'wakw history, culture, languages, customs, and traditions; and 2) field work materials recorded by Boas and Boas' own analyses of material sent by Hunt, covering a similar range of topics. Additional materials by other individuals focus especially on linguistic and ethnographic matters. Also see the "Kwakiutl materials, Franz Boas Papers," for information on the correspondence between Boas and Hunt, which gives additional context to the materials in the ACLS collection.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

K’áshogot’ıné
Alternate forms: Hare
Language(s): English | Slavey, North
Date: 1961-1962
Extent: 9 sound tape reels (14 hr.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Field recordings made at Fort Good Hope and Colville Lake, Northwest Territories, Canada, in the summers of 1961 and 1962. Includes vocabulary and phrase lists relating to hunting, animals, berry-picking, material culture, place names, health, and body parts; songs; autobiographical stories; animal stories; conversations with children. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Legends, etc., collected among the Hare Indians, Fort Good Hope, N.W.T., Canada (Mss.Rec.38)

Nambé | Sandia
Language(s): English | Tiwa, Southern
Date: 1969-1970
Extent: 29 sound tape reels (25 hr., 4 min.)
Description: Includes Text; analysis of the Sandia material by an Isleta informant; household items; foods; directions; natural phenomena; buildings; fruits; time expressions; verbs; adverbs; checking George L. Trager's material; pronominal reference; greetings; animal names (including domesticated); festivals; other ethnographic information. Tape 1 includes Tewa (not Tiwa) texts, vocabulary, speech, and song recorded by Ernest Riechert of Wycliffe Bible Translators at Nambe Pueblo, New Mexico. Some of this material may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity or privacy concerns.
Collection: Linguistic data in the Sandia dialect of Tiwa (Mss.Rec.72)

Navajo
Language(s): English | Navajo
Date: 1966-1977, 1992-1996, 2012-2015
Extent: 2588 pages, 2 photographs, 13 DVDs
Description: The Navajo materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of numerous items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Bsumek, Chamberlain, Chee, Fernald, Field, Garrison, Gill, Hahn, Hammond, Hill, House, Kaufman, Kibrik, Kroskrity, McDonough, Perkins, Pollak, Roberts, Schepers, Shepardson, Shetter, Taptto, Weisiger, and Werner.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Ojibwe | Anishinaabe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Oji-Cree
Date: 1957-2017
Extent: 2.75 linear feet
Description: Almost all of the Charles E. Fiero Papers reflect varieties of Ojibwe/Anishinaabemowin. Fiero, a missionary linguist, is best known within the field for creating the double-vowel orthography. Series I (the bulk) contains manuscripts, while Series II contains a small volume of digital media that has yet to be transferred. The collection represents fieldwork originally done between 1957 and 1993 (bulk 1957-1970s), chronologically arranged by date of first fieldwork, and contains many retranscriptions and reanalyses by Fiero from subsequent decades, illustrating his understanding of the material. The fieldnotes mostly comprise lexica and texts, and individual folders typically contain detailed background information. Fieldwork was mostly conducted in Ontario. Place names include: Berens River, Deer Lake, Pauingassi, Pikangikum, Poplar Hill, Red Lake, White Earth, Cat Lake, Doghole Bar, Fort Hope, Grassy Narrows, McDowell Lake, North Spirit Lake, and Pickle Lake.
Collection: Charles E. Fiero Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.187)

Anishinaabe | Potawatomi
Alternate forms: Pottawotomi
Language(s): English | Potawatomi
Date: 1992
Extent: 16 audiocassettes (18 hr., 4 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Recordings of the Potawatomi language made with speakers Ella Louis, Julia Wesaw, and Martin Wesaw. Most of the recordings consist of interview sessions that include elicitation of miscellaneous Potawatomi words and phrases, as well as words for animals, birds, and household items. Some of the interviews also discussions of various topics such as basket-making, berry picking, pottery, and cooking, and autobiographical stories about boarding school, racial discrimination, military service, speaking Potawatomi, and other topics. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Potawatomi language recordings (Mss.Rec.193)

Quileute
Language(s): English | Quileute
Date: 1969-1970
Extent: 14 sound tape reels (29 hr., 59 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Linguistic field recordings of the Quileute language made by Eric Hamp, based on Manuel J. Andrade's "Quileute Texts" (Columbia University Press, 1931.) The recordings consist of Hamp reading back from Andrade's transcription of Quileute texts to Beatrice Black, a Quileute-speaking consultant, who repeats them in the correct pronunciation, provides explanation, and suggests corrections. Includes occasional discussions in English, with some infrequent English translations of the text. Texts included are primarily Quileute legends and folklore. Also included are conversations and discussions about basket making, local history, family history, education, potlatches, and Quileute vocabulary relating to calculating age, digging clams, gender-specific forms of address, names of rivers, and other miscellaneous terms. Recorded at Taholah, Washington, in August 1969 and November 1970. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Quileute recordings (Mss.Rec.80)