Current Filters
Click filter to remove
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9
Cherokee | Lenape | Meskwaki | Nanticoke | Onondaga
Language(s): English | Cherokee | Delaware | Onondaga
Date: 1783-1817
Type:Text
Extent: 107 pages
Description: These letters authored by Benjamin Barton Smith to various correspondents discuss Indian vocabulary words for birds, earthquakes, and animals of their domestic economy. Smith solicits information about Indian beliefs about health, nursing, menstration, animal sacrifice, Indian Bible, origins of Indian tribes, white race, Orthography and spelling, chief's political power, and comparative linguistic analysis between Indian and Asiatic languages.
Collection: Violetta Delafield-Benjamin Smith Barton Collection (Mss.B.B284d)

Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1755-1763
Type:Text
Extent: 48 letters
Description: Correspondence during the Seven Years' War (1754-1763) regarding the Treaty of Easton, with particular attention to Teedyuscung and the Moravian Indians. One letter from Timothy Horsfled to Benjamin Franklin regards how Indians with smallpox were treated.
Collection: Timothy Horsfield Papers (974.8 H78)  Section 2 (Mss.974.8.H78)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1905-1956
Extent: 44 folders; 1 box
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately 45 items directly pertaining to the Inuit (formerly Eskimos) have been identified. Wallace was particularly interested in arctic hysteria (piblokto) among the Inuit and other polar populations, and 27 folders of research materials on this topic can be found in Series VII. Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute. Of particular interest might be the images in Series XII. Graphics, which include 13 folders of images of individuals (and some dogs) going about normal activites and--at another time--suffering from arctic hysteria. There is also a copy of Wallace's "Interdisciplinary Approaches to Mental Disorder Among the Polar Eskimos of Northwest Greenland" in Series IV. Works by Wallace A. Professional; several copies of articles by other scholars on Inuit and other arctic populations in Series VI. Consulting and Committee Work B. U.S.-Soviet Commission on Anthropology; and one box of research notecards in Series III. Notecards. Among Wallace's many correspondents, files for Robert Ackerman, the American Philosophical Society, the Arctic Health Research Center, the Arctic Institute of North America, Edmund Snow Carpenter, Nancy Yaw Davis, David Landy, Raymond Neutra, and Douglas Oliver include references to Inuits and other Arctic peoples. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Lenape | Nanticoke
Alternate forms: Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1792-1805
Type:Text
Extent: 10 items
Description: Correspondence relating to miscellaneous indigenous peoples and cultures. Seven letters are to John G. E. Heckewelder and three are to Thomas Pennant. Smith's letters to Heckewelder largely consist of questions about Native peoples, cultures, and languages, including a query about Indian names for a particular bird; the Indians' feelings and beliefs about the opossum; Heckewelder's opinion on the strength of body and age of Indians in comparison to whites; what Indian nations in Heckewelder's knowledge compress the heads of children and how it is done; and information on health, nursing, menstruation, etc. Smith also expounds at times, expressing his belief that some Indian nations formerly had a hieroglyphic writing system and asking Heckewelder's opinion, wondering whether Indian chiefs have more or less power now than formerly, and pursuing his inquiry into the relations of North American and Asiatic languages. He is also interested in accuracy of George Henry Loskiel's "History of the Mission of the United Brethren among the Indians in North America," which mentions the Moshkos Indians, of whom Barton had never heard before. Also mentions study of the Nanticoke. Smith's letters to Pennant revolve around the prospects for his work on antiquities and Indians and his hopes for a London edition to satisfy European market, and the possible Welsh origins of American Indians. Barton general disapproves it, but agrees that there is a case for the Welsh origin of the American Indians from physical appearance, while others had seen this as evidence for Jewish origin. He finds striking vocabulary evidence for Jews, Greeks, Scottish Highland, as well as Welsh. [Most of the letters to Heckewelder are from originals in the Gilbert Collection, College of Physicians, Philadelphia.]
Collection: Violetta Delafield-Benjamin Smith Barton Collection (Mss.B.B284d)

Navajo | Hopi
Language(s): English
Date: 1934-1951
Type:Text
Extent: 2 folders
Description: In total, the Kane Family Papers consist of 56 linear feet of letters, legal papers, financial records, etc. of three generations of the prominent Philadelphia family. There is one folder of material relating to the Navajo people located in Series V. Francis Fisher Kane. Labeled "Navaho Indians--1948-1949," this folder contains typed notes (and copies of the notes) to U.S. Representatives Clarence Cannon and Hugh D. Scott and U.S. Senators Carl Hayden and Edward Martin regarding the Navajo Deficiency Bill and asking for their votes to avoid the closure of Navajo schools and hospitals. There are also brief replies from Scott, Hayden, and Martin; Hayden (who was on the Committee of Appropriations) includes the information that the bill has been amended to provide $550,000 for the education of the Navajo and Hopi and $400,000 for their welfare program, and all are hopeful for the success of the bill. Finally, there is a copy of Bulletin Number 8 (June 1948) of the American Friends Service Committee, featuring an article on the Navajo by Paul B. Johnson featuring three photos and focusing on child welfare, public health, education, and economic reform, as well as other articles on other topics. The same series contains a folder labeled "Indian Rights Association #4" that contains correspondence from IRA General Secretary Lawrence E. Lindley, a statement by Jonathan M. Steere about the urgent aid required by the Navajo and Hope, a booklet published by the IRA titled "Indian Truth," and other materials relative to the IRA in the early 1950s, particularly their focus on the Navajo and Hopi.
Collection: Kane Family Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.115)

Navajo
Language(s): English | Navajo
Date: 1966-1977, 1992-1996, 2012-2015
Extent: 2588 pages, 2 photographs, 13 DVDs
Description: The Navajo materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of numerous items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Bsumek, Chamberlain, Chee, Fernald, Field, Garrison, Gill, Hahn, Hammond, Hill, House, Kaufman, Kibrik, Kroskrity, McDonough, Perkins, Pollak, Roberts, Schepers, Shepardson, Shetter, Taptto, Weisiger, and Werner.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Language(s): English
Date: 1755-1763
Type:Text
Extent: 56 letters
Description: In sections 1 and 2. Correspondence during the Seven Years' War (1754-1763) regarding Indian attacks on the frontier and attempts to protect friendly Indians. One letter discusses the use of passports by friendly Indians. Mention of a "berserk soldier at Fort Allen behaves indecently among squaws."
Collection: Timothy Horsfield Papers (Mss.974.8.H78)

Anishinaabe | Potawatomi
Alternate forms: Pottawotomi
Language(s): English | Potawatomi
Date: 1992-1996, 2012-2015
Type:Text
Extent: 380 pages
Description: The Potawatomi materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 3 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Buszard-Welcher, Pollak, and Wishart.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Seneca
Language(s): English | Seneca
Date: 1964-1969, 1978, 1998, 2004, 2012-2015
Extent: 3 linear feet
Description: The Seneca materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of numerous items. Of particular interest is the work of Thomas Abler, documenting the formation of the Seneca Nation of Indians in the 19th century as well as the protest to and aftermath of the construction of the Kinzua Dam that flooded Seneca land. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Abler, John, Nichols, Pollak, Roark-Calnek, and Wyler.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)