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Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1941-1946; 1951-1952
Extent: 1,652 pages, 920 slips, 59 phonograph discs, 4,500 cards
Description: The Cherokee materials in the ACLS collection consist of 3 sets of material located in the "Cherokee" section of the finding aid. The smallest item is Frans Olbrechts' brief essay comparing Cherokee and Ethiopic syllabaries. Two linguistic studies comprise the bulk of the remaining materials. Zellig Harris and John Witthoft's "Cherokee materials" was conducted in Philadelphia at the University of Pennsylvania and consists of grammatical Vocabularies and utterances, extensive grammatical notes and analyses, and numerous ethnographic and autobiographical stories, plus some songs, recorded on phonograph discs with Molly Sequoyah (mainly) and Will French. A small number of texts are written in the Cherokee syllabary as well. A second linguistic study by William Reyburn, conducted in Cherokee, N.C., consists of 1000+ pages of linguistic notes, transcriptions of recordings, and analyses, plus an extensive lexical file organized according to morpheme class. Reyburn's accompanying recordings are cataloged as Mss.Rec.16, "Cherokee materials gathered...on the Cherokee reservation at Cherokee, N.C.," listed separately in this guide.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1953, 1960-1961, 1972, 1976-1977, 1980-1981, 1984-1988, 1992-1999, 2012
Type:Text
Extent: 1123 pages
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 19 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Bender, Druke, Fogelson, Huff, Ishii, Jordan, Kilroe, Kosmider, Nichols, Phillips, Phillips, Pulte, Rachlin, Ruff, Scancarelli, Sheidley, Uchihara, and Witthoft. Some of these materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitvity or privacy considerations.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Language(s): English | Ho-Chunk
Date: 1938-1939
Type:Text
Extent: 281 pages, 11 notebooks
Description: The Ho-Chunk materials in the ACLS collection consists primarily of three items in the "Winnebago (Ho-Chunk)" section of the finding aid. The bulk of the material is Amelia Susman's 11 field notebooks, which contains texts with interlinear translation, Vocabularies, ethnographical and linguistic notes, and some songs. Two additional items also by Susman are extended analyses based upon field work with Sam Blowsnake and wife: "The accentual system of Winnebago" and "The Winnebago syllabary." In the "Chiwere (Iowa)" section of the finding aid, Gordon Marsh's "Materials for a study of the Iowa Indian language" include some Ho-Chunk grammatical notes, and Ho-Chunk cognates with Chiwere. Lastly, in the "Dakota" section, Franz Boas' "Miscellaneous Dakota notes" (item X8a.3) includes a Dakota-Ho-Chunk comparative word list.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi | Ndau | Zulu | Heiltsuk
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Date: 1893-1951
Extent: Approx. 10,000 loose pages, 10 notebooks, 7000+ cards, 10+ maps
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the ACLS collection are located predominantly in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all materials (other relevant sections are "Northwest Coast", "Bella Bella (Heitsuk)", and item AfBnd.4 in "Non-American and non-linguistic material"). Some of the larger individual sets of materials listed within this section also have their own specific tables of contents (available upon request) detailing their often highly diverse contents. Overall, the vast majority of the material is made of of 1) manuscripts sent to Boas by George Hunt from the 1890s to the 1930s, frequently in both Kwak'wala and English, covering a very broad range of Kwakwaka'wakw history, culture, languages, customs, and traditions; and 2) field work materials recorded by Boas and Boas' own analyses of material sent by Hunt, covering a similar range of topics. Additional materials by other individuals focus especially on linguistic and ethnographic matters. Also see the "Kwakiutl materials, Franz Boas Papers," for information on the correspondence between Boas and Hunt, which gives additional context to the materials in the ACLS collection.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Mi'kmaq | Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Beothuk | Cherokee
Alternate forms: Micmac, Malecite
Language(s): English | Mi'kmaq
Date: 1909-1949
Type:Text
Extent: 8 folders
Description: Materials relating to Mi'kmaq history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's field notes on topics such as wampum, hunting territories, Cape Breton texts, Newfoundland traditions, the Passamaquoddy, etc., as well as a map with names of Bear River Band members and one piece of birch bark with pictographs inscribed; Speck's miscellaneous notes and correspondence on topics such as consultants, specimens, hieroglyphics, linguistics, fieldwork, Mi'kmaq and Cherokee, and the Mi'kmaq mission newspaper; a text on Mi'kmaq dance with interlinear translation, notes, and a musical score; 10 pages of linguistic notes and vocabulary collected along the Miramichi River, along with 6 pages of typed copy by John Witthoft; correspondence with Mechling concerning linguistic research on the Mi'kmaq, Malecite [Malecite-Passamaquoddy], and Oaxaca languages, Mi'kmaq burials, and historic materials on Beothuk and Mi'kmaq; a brief article on a traveler's account of the Mi'kmaq in 1822; an incomplete article or set of reading excerpts taken after 1922 by Speck from John G. Millais (1907); and extracts concerning the sweat house taken by Butler from the Jesuit Relations.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Muscogee | Seminole | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English | Muscogee | Yuchi
Date: 1904-1947
Extent: 14 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Creek history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's own notes and work, including "Notes on Social and Economic Conditions Among the Creek Indians of Alabama in 1941" (published as Speck 1947); an undated earlier version of that essay titled "Creek Indians Surviving in Alabama"; 115 pages of linguistic notes from Taskigitown, dated 1904-1905 and organized by categories; Creek and Yuchi songs; Creek and Yuchi Dance; 98 pages of Creek texts, including some interlineal translations, and related notes dated 1904-1905; and 35 pages of miscellaneous notes and letters on topics like dances, language, clothing, myths, handicrafts, and fieldwork. Also includes two botanical specimens--Coopti (Zamia floridana) used by Seminoles, 1941 and Ilex vomitoria Ait, used by Creeks--accompanied by letters to Speck from Richard Evans Schultes concerning Houma Botany; two letters from female students at the Haskell Institute in 1940 (Leona Giger writes of a Creek doll she is making and mentions the council house at Okmulgee, Oklahoma, while Ann Rolland offers to answer questions on Creek use of feathers); a letter from Morris Opler regarding Opler's work among the Creeks, as well as an essay by Opler about the organization, history, and social and political significance of Creek towns; a letter from Mario Gamio acknowledging the receipt of a Creek Indian pamphlet; and a letter from D'Arcy McNickle returning to Speck photographs of the Creek Indians of Atmore, Alabama to prevent them from getting lost and mentioning that his manuscript of the report is still being copied.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Nahua
Alternate forms: Aztec
Date: 1912-1924, 1928, 1930, 1940, 1949-1950, 1953
Type:Text
Extent: 359 pages, Circa 750 slips, 1 notebook (314 pages), 1 volume (168 pages)
Description: The Nahua materials in the ACLS collection consist of numerous items in the "Nahuatl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing. Prominent materials include texts recorded by Boas from Milpa Alta speakers, including Doña Luz Jiménez, in 1912. There are also additional texts, recorded by Miguel Barrios Espinosa in 1950 San Juan Tlilhuacan, Delegacion de Azcapotzales, Mexico City. Boas and Mason's "Nahautl vocabulary" contains 750+ word slips based upon work by Simeón and Mason. "Vocabulares Nawatl" by Leon and Swadesh consists of vocabulary of 3 Nahuatl dialects (identified as Telina, Ilamalan, and San Pedro [Atocpan?]) based on field work in 1939 with 4 speakers. There are additional grammatical studies and linguistic treatments by Whorf, Barlow, Croft, and Ripley. Some Nahuatl vocabulary can also be found in comparative Uto-Aztecan materials in the "Uto-Aztecan" section of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Ahousaht | Cheklesahht | Ehattesaht | Hesquiaht | Hupacasath | Huu-ay-aht | Kyuquot | Mowachaht | Muchalaht | Nuu-chah-nulth | Tla-o-qui-aht | Toquaht | Tseshaht | Uchucklesaht | Ucluelet
Alternate forms: Aht, Clayoquot, Nootka, Nutka, Ohiaht, Opetchesaht, Tahkaht
Language(s): English | Nuu-chah-nulth
Date: 1895-1952 (bulk 1910-1914, 1931-1935)
Extent: 5600+ loose pages, 66,000+ slips, 29 notebooks
Description: The Nuu-chah-nulth materials in the ACLS collection consist of a large body of various materials primarily collected by Franz Boas, Edward Sapir, George Hunt, and Morris Swadesh. The majority of the content pertains to Hupacasath and Tseshaht people in the Alberni Valley area, with the exception of the Hunt materials, which were recorded in the Yuquot area, Mowachaht territory. All of these materials are found in the "Nootka" section of the finding aid, which contains a full, detailed listing. The Boas materials are consist of a lexicon of 1500+ word slips dating from the 1890s. Hunt's "Nootka Tales" consist of large body of traditional stories written in English and later typed up by Sapir with additional notes. Sapir's materials comprise the bulk of this section overall. See especially his extremely voluminous "Miscellaneous Nootka material," the final item in the "Nootka" section, for which a detailed table of contents is available upon request. This set of materials includes 24 field notebooks with extensive stories (some unpublished or untranslated) and ethnographic notes, as well of 80 folders of typed up notes from the notebooks, arranged into categories. It also includes some photographs, censuses of Nuu-chah-nulth "bands" (1920-1921), and 10 folders notes derived by Sapir (and Swadesh?) from "NW Coast Sources and Archives," pertaining to the region more broadly, including information on Coast Salish culture and history. Finally, Swadesh's materials include some additional ethnographic and linguistic field work, as well as extensive bodies of linguistic analysis of materials recorded by Sapir and himself.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)