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Anishinaabe | Hawaiian | Potawatomi | Paiute | Cheyenne | Dakota | Arapaho | Kiowa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1942-1968
Description: There are many items relating to Indigenous American languages in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for materials that cover Indigenous American languages in general and might not show up in narrower searches. Researchers should also view the entries for specific languages and regions. For this more general category, there is relevant material in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, there are 7 folders relating to Voegelin's intended publication "American Indian Language" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III-B: Works Authored by Voegelin [see also the associated material in Oversized]. Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-C: Other contains one file on inscribed stones and the Dene syllabary system and another on the Summer Linguistic Institute (in which many Native North American languages are mentioned). There are also two images of a stone inscribed with what were supposed to be Potawatomi petroglyphs in Series VII. Photographs. Also in Series VII are several language maps (i.e., "Indian language groups in the state of Illinois" and "American Indian Languages"), in which Algonquian languages are particularly well-represented. In Subcollection II, there is relevant correspondence with Wallace Chafe (regarding a census of speakers of indigenous languages), Kenneth Croft (regarding the state of American language work in Mexico, the use of mechanical recording equipment, Cheyenne materials, etc.), Samuel H. Elbert (regarding place names in Hawaii, comparison with Oceania and North America), Dell Hymes (regarding Anthropological Lingustics), Vernon E. Jake (regarding proposed language speaker census, particularly how to discern whether children really know the language), Luis S. Kemnitzer (a thank-you note in which Voegelin revealingly acknowledges, "Although I once worked with the Dakota language, I know little of its culture."), Jerome Kirk (a thank you known in which Voegelin asserts, "I've never found any speaker among the twenty American Indian languages I've worked with who got them [directional terms] straight."), and Morris Swadesh (many languages). Also in Subcollection II, there is a file of notes on classification of North American languages in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries XI. General; some "Ungrouped Tales," two folders with stories about Pechiha (Kickapoo?) and Yellow Horse (Arapaho?) attributed to Joe Pierce and Bruno Nettl, respectively, and a folder on sources in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II. American Indian Tales for Children; and drafts, linguistic notes and maps in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries V. American Indian Languages.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Menominee
Language(s): English | Menominee
Date: circa 1930s-1960s
Type:Text
Extent: 10 folders, 3 boxes
Description: The C. F. Voegelin Papers contain vocabulary, grammatical notes, short texts, and other linguistic and ethnographic materials relating to Menominee language and culture. These are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II of the Voegelin Papers. Materials in Subcollection I include corespondence with Leonard Bloomfield (regarding inscription on a silver bracelet obtained from Menominees and Bloomfield's "Menomini Grammar") in Series I. Correspondence; and 3 boxes of Menominee vocabulary and 2 folders of document files (mostly regarding kinship terminology) in Series II. Card Files. Materials in Subcollection II include a folder of Menominee notes (possibly given to Voegelin by Leonard Bloomfield) in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian. There are also Menominee examples in at least 6 folders ("Č and K," "L and M," "N and P," " Š and T," "Θ and ?" and "Specimens of Central Algonquian") of the many Comparative Algonquian notebooks in the same subseries (i.e., Macro-Algonquian).
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Muscogee | Seminole | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English | Muscogee | Yuchi
Date: 1904-1947
Extent: 14 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Creek history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's own notes and work, including "Notes on Social and Economic Conditions Among the Creek Indians of Alabama in 1941" (published as Speck 1947); an undated earlier version of that essay titled "Creek Indians Surviving in Alabama"; 115 pages of linguistic notes from Taskigitown, dated 1904-1905 and organized by categories; Creek and Yuchi songs; Creek and Yuchi Dance; 98 pages of Creek texts, including some interlineal translations, and related notes dated 1904-1905; and 35 pages of miscellaneous notes and letters on topics like dances, language, clothing, myths, handicrafts, and fieldwork. Also includes two botanical specimens--Coopti (Zamia floridana) used by Seminoles, 1941 and Ilex vomitoria Ait, used by Creeks--accompanied by letters to Speck from Richard Evans Schultes concerning Houma Botany; two letters from female students at the Haskell Institute in 1940 (Leona Giger writes of a Creek doll she is making and mentions the council house at Okmulgee, Oklahoma, while Ann Rolland offers to answer questions on Creek use of feathers); a letter from Morris Opler regarding Opler's work among the Creeks, as well as an essay by Opler about the organization, history, and social and political significance of Creek towns; a letter from Mario Gamio acknowledging the receipt of a Creek Indian pamphlet; and a letter from D'Arcy McNickle returning to Speck photographs of the Creek Indians of Atmore, Alabama to prevent them from getting lost and mentioning that his manuscript of the report is still being copied.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Ahousaht | Cheklesahht | Ehattesaht | Hesquiaht | Hupacasath | Huu-ay-aht | Kyuquot | Mowachaht | Muchalaht | Nuu-chah-nulth | Tla-o-qui-aht | Toquaht | Tseshaht | Uchucklesaht | Ucluelet
Alternate forms: Aht, Clayoquot, Nootka, Nutka, Ohiaht, Opetchesaht, Tahkaht
Language(s): English | Nuu-chah-nulth
Date: 1895-1952 (bulk 1910-1914, 1931-1935)
Extent: 5600+ loose pages, 66,000+ slips, 29 notebooks
Description: The Nuu-chah-nulth materials in the ACLS collection consist of a large body of various materials primarily collected by Franz Boas, Edward Sapir, George Hunt, and Morris Swadesh. The majority of the content pertains to Hupacasath and Tseshaht people in the Alberni Valley area, with the exception of the Hunt materials, which were recorded in the Yuquot area, Mowachaht territory. All of these materials are found in the "Nootka" section of the finding aid, which contains a full, detailed listing. The Boas materials are consist of a lexicon of 1500+ word slips dating from the 1890s. Hunt's "Nootka Tales" consist of large body of traditional stories written in English and later typed up by Sapir with additional notes. Sapir's materials comprise the bulk of this section overall. See especially his extremely voluminous "Miscellaneous Nootka material," the final item in the "Nootka" section, for which a detailed table of contents is available upon request. This set of materials includes 24 field notebooks with extensive stories (some unpublished or untranslated) and ethnographic notes, as well of 80 folders of typed up notes from the notebooks, arranged into categories. It also includes some photographs, censuses of Nuu-chah-nulth "bands" (1920-1921), and 10 folders notes derived by Sapir (and Swadesh?) from "NW Coast Sources and Archives," pertaining to the region more broadly, including information on Coast Salish culture and history. Finally, Swadesh's materials include some additional ethnographic and linguistic field work, as well as extensive bodies of linguistic analysis of materials recorded by Sapir and himself.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Oneida | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Six Nations
Language(s): English
Date: August 9, 1770; October 28, 1787; July 1798;
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: Materials can be found in the finding aid under the specific dates listed. Late 18th century items relating to missionary efforts among Oneidas. Topics include Indians' hope to hear Whitefield preach (thwarted when he went on to Boston because no congress was to be held at Sir William Johnson's); Rev. Samuel Kirkland; Minto's belief that Oneida share a common origin with Europeans because they identify Great and Small Bear by the same image; and Quaker missionaries' offer to set up a blacksmith shop to train Indians, to find iron, and to apprentice Indians as farmers.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Anishinaabe | Potawatomi
Alternate forms: Pottawotomi
Language(s): English | Potawatomi
Date: circa 1925-1967
Extent: 6 folders
Description: The C. F. Voegelin Papers contain notes, notebooks, stories, photographs, and other linguistic and ethnographic materials relating to Potawatomi (Pottowatomi) language and culture. These are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II of the Voegelin Papers. Materials in Subcollection I include relevant correspondence with Eli Lilly (regarding the discovery of inscribed stones and their possible meaning; see photographs referenced below) in Series I. Correspondence; a folder of Ojibwa [Ojibwe] and Pottowatomi [Potawatomi] comparative vocabularies in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A: Language Notes; a folder of three undated "Pottowatomi" notebooks containing texts (with some English translation) and mentioning consultants Smallman Isaac, William George, and William Soney in Series VI. Notebooks; and two images of stones inscribed with Potawatomi petroglyphs, from Elkhart, Indiana, in Series VII. Photographs. These images have been digitized and are available through the APS's Digital Library. In Subcollection II, there are Potawatomi stories in the Eastern Woodland category in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II: American Indian Tales for Children.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Sahaptin | Tayx | Umatilla | Walla Walla | Yakama
Alternate forms: Shahaptin, Tygh, Walla Walla, Yakima
Language(s): English | Umatilla | Walla Walla | Yakama
Date: 1966, 1988
Type:Text
Extent: 158 pages
Description: The Sahaptin materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 4 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Hunn and Rigsby. The Hunn material consists of a typeset manuscript draft "Plateau Place names"; copy of fieldnotes; Sahaptin place name transcriptions, with information about itinerary, along Columbia River, Oregon. Rigsby's materials consist of 3 items: "A Short Practical Dictionary of the Yakima Sahaptin Language," which includes a history of language documentation, notes about orthography, and a ca.670-item lexicon; "Report on 1966 Sahaptin Linguistic Field Research"; and "Yakama Sahaptin texts," containing 4 stories modified from Melville Jacobs' "Northwest Sahaptin Texts, Part II."
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)