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Haudenosaunee | Lenape | Catawba | Cherokee | Houma | Nanticoke | Abenaki | Cayuga | Tutelo | Onondaga | Mohawk | Tuscarora
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1777-1950, bulk 1914-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 23 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Haudenosaunee history, language, and culture. Includes correspondence with Haudenosaunee consultants like John L. Buck, Seth Newhouse, Josiah Hill, David S. Hill, etc., on topics ranging from the seizure of wampum by the Canadian government, Newhouse's request that Speck secure wampum for him, Newhouse's offer to sell Speck his history manuscript, which he has been working on since 1885 [#1650], Haudenosaunee burial customs, religion, etc.; an essay by Jesse Moses titled "The Long-House man, a Six Nations Indian of Canada speaks his mind," about the relationship of Christianity and the long-house religion; Speck's correspondence with William N. Fenton, principally concerning field work among the Catawba, Cherokee, and Houma but also touching on Fenton's Seneca field work, Speck's various studies of the Haudenosaunee, and the Second Conference on Iroquois Research; correspondence with other anthropologists about various aspects of Haudenosaunee history and culture such as material culture specimens, archaeology, historical sources, agriculture, education, warfare, religion, population statistics, etc.; a draft of Speck's "Reflections on Iroquois religion" and related correspondence; an undated document describing a meeting of Delaware, Nanticoke, and Canadian Iroquois in the presence of Speck and recounting the injustices suffered by Indians in United States and Canada; a copy of a 1777 treaty made by Peter F. Timothy, a Moravian Delaware, in August 1888, and transmitted to Speck by Jesse Moses; and Speck's research notes and other miscellaneous correspondence on topics such as masks, art, museum specimens, hunting territory, chiefships, words, warfare with the Abenaki, the Delaware-as-women theme, academic publications and conferences, etc.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Language(s): English | Ho-Chunk
Date: 1908-1930 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 49 items
Description: Materials relating to Radin's study of Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) history, culture, and language. Some items are written in Ho-Chunk, with and without English translations. This large collection includes 34 original field notebooks; numerous short and long stories (Hare cycle, Aleck Linetree [probably Alec Lone Tree], the origin of the Buffalo clan, the story of the holy one, the boy who wished to be immortal, etc.); several longer pieces, such as a typed manuscript titled "The legend of Mother-of-all-the-Earth," speeches of Charlie Houghton, multiple versions of "How Blowsnake joined the medicine dance," "Origin myth of the medicine dance," etc.; several published secondary sources; over 3,000 slips for an English-Winnebago [i.e. Ho-Chunk] dictionary and other items relating to Ho-Chunk phonetics, lexicon, linguistics, etc.; several phonetic texts, some with English translation; and a variety of other items with ethnographic, historical, and linguistic data pertaining to ceremonies, tales, clans, medicine, origins, dance, burial, peyote, names, and sweat-baths. Individuals mentioned (some as ) include: Jacob Russell, Charlie Houghton, Oliver LaMere, Sam Blowsnake, John Rave, Thomas Clay, Robert Lincoln, James Smith, Tom Big Bear, and George Ricehill.
Collection: Paul Radin papers (Mss.497.3.R114)

Mi'kmaq | Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Beothuk | Cherokee | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Micmac, Malecite
Language(s): English | Mi'kmaq
Date: 1909-1949
Type:Text
Extent: 8 folders
Description: Materials relating to Mi'kmaq history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's field notes on topics such as wampum, hunting territories, Cape Breton texts, Newfoundland traditions, the Passamaquoddy, etc., as well as a map with names of Bear River Band members and one piece of birch bark with pictographs inscribed; Speck's miscellaneous notes and correspondence on topics such as consultants, specimens, hieroglyphics, linguistics, fieldwork, Mi'kmaq and Cherokee, and the Mi'kmaq mission newspaper; a text on Mi'kmaq dance with interlinear translation, notes, and a musical score; 10 pages of linguistic notes and vocabulary collected along the Miramichi River, along with 6 pages of typed copy by John Witthoft; correspondence with Mechling concerning linguistic research on the Mi'kmaq, Malecite [Malecite-Passamaquoddy], and Oaxaca languages, Mi'kmaq burials, and historic materials on Beothuk and Mi'kmaq; a brief article on a traveler's account of the Mi'kmaq in 1822; an incomplete article or set of reading excerpts taken after 1922 by Speck from John G. Millais (1907); and extracts concerning the sweat house taken by Butler from the Jesuit Relations.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Montauk
Language(s): English
Date: 1764
Type:Text
Extent: 6 pages
Description: A transcript of Occom's "State of the Indians at Montauk on Long Island" from an original manuscript in the Yale Library. Concerns marriage, naming of children, religion, death practices. 2 pages of genealogical data on Maine Indians. [Printed, Occom, Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1st series, 10: 108.]
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Penobscot | Ojibwe | Seneca | Lenape
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Lenape
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: circa 1930s-1960s
Type:Text
Extent: 4 folders, 1 box
Description: The C. F. Voegelin Papers contain correspondence, notes, texts, articles, and other linguistic and ethnographic materials relating to Penobscot language and culture. These are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II of the Voegelin Papers. Materials in Subcollection I include correspondence with Frank Siebert (regarding his Penobscot fieldwork, particularly mourning and mortuary customs); 1 box of Ojibwa [Ojibwe], Seneca, and Penobscot notes in Series II. and Penobscot material in Ojibwe Folder #24 in Series VI. Notebooks. In Subcollection II, there is Frank Siebert's "Bumole, The Air Sprite" (a story in Penobscot and in English, sent to Voegelin in 1939) in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian; and a Penobscot file in Series V. Card Files.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Seneca | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Seneca
Date: 1921-1949
Extent: 16 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's interest in Seneca language, history, and culture. Several folders contain correspondence, including one with six letters from Jesse Cornplanter to Speck and others on topics such as his religious beliefs and changes in the way of life; praising Speck; pay for Native consultants; sending Christmas greetings; and husk faces. Other correspondence includes letters from Charles E. Congdon concerning Coldspring Longhouse ceremonies, use of stick and post in dance, Tonawanda and Cattaraugus medicines, congratulating Speck on his Iroquois (1945), describing Alleghany ceremonials, and giving a sketch of the arrangement of participants; from James M. Luongo concerning Seneca and other specimens; from Clara Redeye transmitting a 1941 picture of four generations and sending dolls; from Spencer F. William, a Seneca writer seeking work; from Evangeline Clark sending thanks for reprints, which she had sent to Suffolk University; from Merle H. Deardorff concerning consultant Clayton White, Pennsylvania place names, Speck (1942), and a lengthy discussion of the practices of Handsome Lake adherents; and from Speck to Deardorff concerning an Iroquois conference at Allegany. Other folders contain William N. Fenton's Seneca ceremonial calendar from Coldspring, 131 pages of organized, detailed field notes on ceremonies; Congdon's 4-page essay comparing the religion of Handsome Lake with Judaism and Greco-Roman spirits; Clayton White's description of the one-year death feast; Clayton White's description of a False Face Dance at Coldspring Long House, taken for Deardorff; Speck's miscellaneous notes containing words and two letters from Sherman Redeye to Speck concerning corn-husk masks; Speck's notes on the Oklahoma Seneca with an outline of ceremonials and a chart, with special attention to dances and funerary practices; and Ferdinand Isserman's student paper "Mythology of Seneca Indians." Some of these materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Shawnee
Language(s): English
Date: 1903-1948
Type:Text
Extent: 6 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's interest in Shawnee language, history, and culture. Includes an essay on Speck's visit to an excavation site at Fort Hill, Pennsylvania in July 1903 in which he identifies the site as Shawnee; a letter from Carl Voegelin and Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin transmitting lists of Shawnee dances to Speck; a letter from Wheeler-Voegelin concerning field data on Shawnee use of false faces; an undated report by Wheeler-Voegelin on general burial traits, including a brief account of field experiences and an 8-page outline of burial, funerary, and condolence procedure; a letter from Gladys Tantaquidgeon concerning Shawnee legends, asking about silk applique techniques, and enclosing news clippings; and 16 pages of Speck's miscellaneous Shawnee notes and correspondence, including two letters from Earl L. Poole (Reading Museum), together with a transcript of a 1747 letter of Conrad Weiser taken from American German Review: 12: 4, 18-19, April 1946, regarding meeting of Shawnees and Count Zinzendorf; a postal card from "C" on grasshopper war; a letter from Wheeler-Voegelin; a letter from War Eagle concerning Bread Dance; 1912 notes on Bread Dance and names given Speck; and notes on Shawnee clans.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Tutelo | Lenape | Cayuga | Onondaga
Language(s): English
Date: 1931-1942
Type:Text
Extent: 5 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's interest in Tutelo language, history, and culture. These include three letters from Canadian (Grand River, Ontario) Delaware Samuel John concerning John's Tutelo background and Speck's visit to Canadian Delawares; Speck's field notes from Grand River, Ontario on recordings of Tutelo and Onondaga songs and noting the order of rites [see also Speck (1942)]; Speck's Tutelo field notes from Ohsweken including a notebook of 53 pages of ceremonials, an account of Tutelo ceremonial procedure, a note on the Cayuga burial and redressing ceremony, and letters from indigenous consultants George Nash and Mrs. John Ruck concerning museum specimens; 12 pages of miscellaneous notes and correspondence, including a 1-page list of Tutelo names, 2 pages on Longhouse religious ceremonies, 1 note card and 4 pages of reading notes on adoption rites, two letters from John R. Swanton to Speck citing Byrd's History of the Dividing Line for Sappony-Tutelo references and concerning Tutelo linguistic forms and relationships, a letter from William N. Fenton to Speck concerning Tutelo songs and difficulties of attending Seneca longhouse ceremonies, and a letter from H. W. Dorsey (Smithsonian Institution) transmitting a photo of a Tutelo adoption necklace; and an 11-page draft of an essay on Tutulo ceremonies focusing on the adoption rite. (NOTE: portions of these materials pertaining to Tutelo ceremonies may be restricted due to potential cultural sensitivity.)
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)