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Maya | Mixtec
Language(s): French
Date: 1859-1882
Extent: 2.0 linear feet, 123 photographs
Description: A traveler, archaeologist, and photographer, Désiré Charnay (1828-1915) was one of the most important early expeditionary photographers. During his tours of Yucatan, Oaxaca, and Chiapas in 1858-1860 and 1880-1886, Charnay became one of the first to use photography in documenting the great Meso-American archaeological sites and to make ethnographic photographs of indigenous Mexicans. This collection of photographs is representative of the range of images he took of Meso-American archaeological sites during three tours of Mexico in 1858-1860 and 1880-1886. Although some of the images have suffered an unfortunate degree of fading, they convey the power and fascination that these sites held for Charnay and his contemporaries, and include some of the best early examples of the use of photography in the documentation of Mexican archaeology. The collection includes images of the sites at Tula, Teotihuacan, Iztaccihuatl, Chichen Itza, Comalcalco, and Palenque; of archaeological specimens held at the Museum of Mexico; of landscape and villages in Yucatan, Chiapas, and Oaxaca; and of a series of Lacandon, Mayan, Mixtec, and Yucatec "racial types." The collection was apparently assembled by the scientist Griffith Evans Abbot (1850-1927), who presented them to the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. The 15 cartes de visite included in the collection, mostly portraits taken in Peru, Chile, and Madeira, bear an uncertain relationship to the Charnay images, and are probably present simply because they were also once owned by Abbot. All images have been digitized and are available through the APS Digital Library.
Collection: Abbot-Charnay Photograph Collection (Mss.913.72.Ab23)

Maya
Language(s): French | English
Date: August 20, 1834; undated
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: Corroy is critical of Waldeck's claim to be the Champollion of Mexico. Mentions Del Rio, Cabrera, Bemarions, and Castaneda. Rafinesque mentions ancient Mexican and Mayan civilization in an undated outline for a lecture on American history.
Collection: C. S. (Constantine Samuel) Rafinesque correspondence and writings (Mss.B.R124)

Huastec | Purépecha | Tarahumara | Otomi
Language(s): English | Spanish | French
Date: 1802-1899
Type:Text
Extent: 22 items
Description: Materials relating to the indigenous cultures and languages of Mexico. Includes requests to view or borrow materials at APS, particularly in the Poinsett Collection; introductions of scholars who wish to view Mexican materials to the Librarian or other appropriate official of the time (including John Vaughan and George Ord); solicitations for donations of Mexican materials, particularly from Joel R. Poinsett; donation of linguistic and other materials from Jose Joaquin de Ferrer;s relating to indigenous cultures and languages of Mexico, particularly Brinton's papers on Nagualism and on Fuegian languages [Brinton (1892) and Brinton (1894)], Valentini's manuscript on Mexican calendar stone, and linguistic work by Albert Gallatin; Mexican antiquities at other institutions such as the Academy of Natural Sciencies, Princeton, and the Peabody Museum; and Samuel Morton's offer to George Ord to exchange books for a Mexican skull he used for a plate in his Crania Americana (1839), and which he now wishes to add to his collection. Specific cultures or languages mentioned include Huastec, Otomi, Tarascan, Tarahumara, and Mexican. Individuals mentioned include Ephraim G. Squier, Bishop Anders, Mr. Frank, Professor Matile, Mr. Bagely, Thomas Sully, Jean-Frédéric Waldeck, and Lord Kingsborough.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Tzeltal | Maya
Language(s): French | English
Date: 1959-1962
Type:Text
Genre: Essays | Notes
Description: The Tzeltal materials in the Lounsbury Papers are fairly brief, limited to work done by other scholars interested in linguistics, history, and medicine, all found in Series II.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)