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Cayuga | Tuscarora | Mohawk | Onondaga | Seneca | Haudenosaunee | Lenape | Nanticoke
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Cayuga
Date: 1914-1947
Type:Text
Extent: 10 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Cayuga history, language, and culture. This includes Speck's correspondence with indigenous consultants such as Deskaheh and Alexander General (who became known as Deskaheh after the other's death in 1925) on topics such as museum specimens, games, religion, politics, land claims, stories, etc.; correspondence with other anthropologists such as Ernest Dodge about Cayuga war medicine [see also Speck and Dodge (1945)] and William N. Fenton concerning Cayuga winter rituals and suggestions for Speck's Cayuga manuscripts [see also Speck (1945b)]; and a notebook of Cayuga material containing ethnographic data and mentioning consultants John L. Buck, Mrs. John L. Buck, and Jerry Aaron as well as Deskaheh.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Chinautleco | Kaqchikel | Maya | Poqomam
Alternate forms: Cakchiquel, Cakchikel, Kaqchiquel
Language(s): English | Spanish | Kaqchikel | K'iche' | Poqomam
Date: 1596-1984
Contributor: Reina, Ruben E.
Extent: 7.5 linear feet
Description: The materials in the Ruben Reina papers relating to the Chinautla region of Guatemala are found primarily in Series III of the collection. This series consists of material relating to the Chinautla region and neighboring areas of Guatemala, including primarily Poqomam-speaking peoples. This section includes an extensive amount of copies from the Archivo General de Centroamerica (AGCA), local archives, and oral history interviews.
Collection: Ruben E. Reina Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.67)

Lenape | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1991
Contributor: Lowe, Joan L.
Type:Text
Genre: Theses
Extent: 86 pages
Description: This senior thesis for honors in American History was submitted to the University of Pennsylvania in 1991. Lowe's advisors were Anthony F. C. Wallace and Edward C. Carter III. The author was inspired by Peggy Reeves Sanday and Carroll Smith-Rosenberg to develop a feminist perspective in her study of history, and approaches the "Delaware as women" trope accordingly to argue that Delawares adopted a "European gender discourse" that "contributed to the erosion of Delaware Indian culture." Lowe focuses on laying out the background of the "Delaware as women"problem; analyzing morality (particular sexual mores), gender roles, and the use of the word "petticoats" in the context of Delaware culture; the position of the Delawares in relation to the Six Nation; land disputes and agreements; the fur trade; religion, particularly Moravian missionaries and native prophets; and politics. Gift of Joan L. Lowe.
Collection: Colonial gender discourse and the Delaware Indians; 1991 (Mss.970.3.L948c)

Dakota | Lakota
Alternate forms: Dakhota, Lakhota, Santee, Sioux, Teton, Yankton
Language(s): Dakota | English | Lakota
Date: 1838-1938 (bulk 1930s)
Type:Text
Extent: 7500+ pages, 3300+ slips; 2 notebooks
Description: The Dakota and Lakota materials in the ACLS collection consist of a very large and diverse set of materials, and are located in the "Dakota" section of the finding aid, which provides a detailed listing of all contents. The vast majority of these materials were composed and assembled by Ella Deloria during the 1930s, both recorded from contemporary speakers and from various historical manuscript sources, which were sent to Franz Boas. The bulk of Deloria's materials are stories and speeches in typewritten manuscript form, with a transcription in the original language, followed by a literal word-for-word translation, then a free translation in English, and a section of footnotes commenting upon the original text and translation decisions. Some of her manuscripts occasionally lack one or more of these sections. These texts cover a wide range of topics, from traditional narratives, historical accounts, autobiographical stories, descriptions of games, customs, ceremonies, etc., and speeches, often concerning political affairs and economic conditions from the late-19th century to the 1930s. Names of numerous speakers are also given in the manuscripts themselves. Some of these materials were published, but most were not. Note that Deloria identifies the language recorded by using the terms "Teton" for Lakota language, and "Santee" and "Yankton" to indicate Eastern and Western dialects of Dakota language. The collection also includes a much smaller amount of material by Boas and others, primarily consisting of linguistics notes and musical analysis. A full list of places where the material was recorded has not yet been assembled.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Lenape | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Odawa | Miami | Illinois
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois, Odawa
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1730-1990, bulk 1947-1956
Type:Text
Extent: 44 folders, 1 box
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately 44 folders and one box of materials directly pertaining to the Delaware (also known as Lenape and Munsee) have been identified. Most of these items pertain to Wallace's personal research interest in the Delaware--beginning during his graduate studies, which led to the publication of "King of the Delawares: Teedyuscung, Delaware chief, 1700-1763" (1949), a psychoanalytic ethnohistory based on his masters thesis--and to his work as an expert witness for Native American land claims in the 1950s. There is one box containing research notecards on primary and secondary sources in Series III. Notecards. There are eight folders of notes, drafts, and other materials on Teedyscung, religion and revitalization, women, land, political organization, and other topics in Series IV. Works by Wallace A. Professional. There are two folders on "The Forbidden Path: Teedyuscung's Embassy to the Western Indians in 1760" by William A. Hunter and John Witthoft in Series V. Works by Others. Series IX. Indian Claims contains dockets, articles, notes, tribal histories, reports, etc., relating to Wallace's work as an expert witness for Delaware land claims (and the related land claims of other groups, such as the "Ohio Tribes," and Iroquois, or Haudenosaunee). There are also two folders of materials on the Lenape by Wallace's student Marshall Joseph Becker in Series II. Research Notes and Drafts B. Revitalization and Culture, as well as a folder of correspondence with Becker in Series I. Correspondence. Other relevant correspondence files include those of the American National Biography, Carl Bridenbaugh, Dwight Lewis Chamberlain, Loren C. Eiseley, the Eleutherian Mills--Hagley Foundation, Herbert Goltz, Jennifer King Hodges, William A. Hunter, Ruthe Blalock Jones, Mrs. Samuel P. Kelly, Harry B. Kelsey, Jean Laub, Franklin O. Loveland, Joan Lowe, Arthur Meyes, Russell Moses, Elizabeth Pilant, Claude E. Schaefer, Frank Speck, John Tabor, University of Pennsylvania Press, C. A. Weslager, and David Wyubeek. Finally, there is a folder of material on the history of the Munsee Recitation Festival (from originals in the Buffalo Historical Society and attributed to a Delaware resident of the Six Nations reserve in Canada, Albert Shequaqknind Anthony) in Series II. Research Notes and Drafts A. Indian Research. Note that there is also considerable Delaware material filed under "Ohio Tribes," particularly in land claims cases, and researchers should view the Ohio entry as well. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Onondaga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1850-1855
Type:Text
Extent: 32 items
Description: "Letters of Onondaga Indians." Letters from two young Christian Onondaga Indians, Thomas La Fort and Jameson L. Thomas, about their efforts to get an education so they might help their tribe; from Chief David Hill, leader of the Christian Onondagas, asking for financial and political aid when the New York state legislature refused money for a school on the Onondaga reservation, and when the Christian and traditionalist factions sought to divide the reservation between them. Letters are itemized, with brief descriptions, in the guide to the Ebenezer Meriam Correspondence.
Collection: Ebenezer Meriam correspondence (Mss.970.3.On1)

Oneida | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1974
Contributor: Campisi, Jack
Type:Text
Extent: 520 pages
Description: This dissertation by anthropologist Jack Campisi was submitted to the State University of New York at Albany in 1974. The author organized the dissertation into chapters on methodology; war, trade, and change in Oneida society, 1600 to 1810; culture and history of the Wisconsin Oneidas; contemporary society of the Oneidas of Wisconsin; history and culture of the Oneida of the Thames; conflict and division in Oneida society, 1900-1934; contemporary society of the Oneidas of the Thames; the Oneidas of New York, 1840-present; and a conclusion with various approaches to comparing the ecologies, kinship systems, belief systems, political systems, and intra- and inter-tribal relations of the three communities as Campisi seeks to assess the evolving identities and ability to perform "boundary maintence" of each Oneida community. Campisi was a recipient of an APS Phillips Fund grant, and donated this item to the Society.
Collection: Ethnic identity and boundary maintenance in three Oneida communities (Mss.970.3.C15e)

Menominee
Alternate forms: Menomini
Language(s): English | Menominee
Date: 1999-2000
Extent: 11 audiocassettes (10 hr., 11 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Linguistic recordings with Menominee speakers, focusing on negative forms, autobiographical and traditional stories, word lists, and conversations. Also includes some songs and prayers. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Fieldwork in the Menominee language (Mss.Rec.254)

Shawnee | Seneca
Language(s): English | Shawnee
Date: 1700s-1989
Extent: 40 linear feet
Description: This collection consists almost entirely of photocopies of secondary and primary materials relating to Shawnee history and culture, and the history of the Ohio River region. The majority of the materials are copies of published sources, from the 18th to 20th century, with Stevens' notes on them. The collection is organized according to the topics by which Stevens kept his copies and notes, covering a very broad range of subject matter.
Collection: Harry Stevens Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.99)

Haudenosaunee | Oneida | Seneca
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1939
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The Haudenosaunee materials in the Hallowell papers are located in Series V. There are postcards of museum exhibits featuring Iroquois culture in the "American Indian" series of folders. The rest of the materials are concentrated in the folder labled "Eastern Woodlands." These items include information on material culture, the social organization of the confederacy, a chart of relational systems of clans, kinship, and genealogy. Specific topics includ Huron Mythology, Oneida magic, Seneca secret societies and genealogy. Some of this material is culturally sensitive and may be restricted.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)