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Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Maliseet | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki | Atikamekw
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Tete de Boule
Date: 1914-1930
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Hallowell Papers are mostly located in Series V, Research Files, in folders labled "Abenaki" and Series VI, Photographs, Subseries E "St. Francis Abenaki Album." These include linguistic, ethnographic, ethnobotanical, ceremonial knowledge, information on political organization, and historical materials. Of particular interest are a sketch of Abenaki history from 1600-1930 accompanied by detailed notes from secondary sources on 17th century Abenaki history. The linguistic materials include an analysis of how the language changed after contact with Catholic missionaries, Abenaki vocabulary related to body parts, Abenaki phonetics, and religious, medical, and kinship terminology. The ethnobotanical materials include a manuscript labled "Identity of animals and plants," and information concerning herbal medicine and its practitioners. There is a wealth of ethnographic materials that include drawings of pipes, descriptions of games, baketry and birch bark maks. There is descriptions of Abenaki music and diagrams of dances, as well as detailed descriptions of hunting techniques. Some of the genealogical materials contains lists of community members names and descriptions of marriage. Interspered throughout the folders labled "Abenaki" in the Research Files are interlinear translations of stories such as "Man who could Find Lost Objects," "Woman and Bear Lover" and numerous other stories. The materials on hunting include topics such as the use of snow shoes, preparation of moose hide,and techniques and drawings of trapping. The collections contain important information designation hunting territories and family names. Four folders contain detailed informaiton on kinship terms. Two folders on Measurements and Genealogical data contain lists of names. The folders labled "Linguistics" in Series V contain scattered information about Abenaki grammar. In Series VI, of 160 photographs taken at St. Francis, Odanak in the Centre-du-Québec region. The Abenaki people in the photographs are identified, in most cases, and also include depictions of traditional dress, buildings, clothing, baskets, and a wide variety of material culture. The correspondence, in Series I, includes letters from Theophile Panadis; Gordon Day describing his collection of stories, recordings, vocabularies, and hunting territories. Henry Lorne Masta, one of Hallowell's Abenaki consultants, writes about culture and language. Additional correspondents may contain other Abenaki-related information.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Achumawi | Atsugewi
Language(s): Achumawi | Atsugewi | English
Date: 1907, 1931-1935
Type:Text
Extent: 615 pages
Description: The Achumawi materials in the ACLS collection include a word list from the Pit River area; autobiographies of Willard Carmony, an Achumawi speaker, whose stories refers to being sent to Fort Bidwell Indian Boarding School; linguistic analysis of Achumawi's relationship to the Hokan lanugage family; conversational texts in the Achumawi language; free English translations; and grammars. Also included are notes on dialectical differences between Atwamdzini, Hammawi, Adzumawi. Tales, myths, and song texts, with interlinear and free translations. Materials located primarily in the "Achumawi" section of the finding aid. See also the "Atsugewi" section.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Acoma
Language(s): English | Keres, Western
Date: 1957-1963, 1969
Type:Text
Extent: 261 pages
Description: The Acoma materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 2 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Irvine Davis and Joel Maring.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Anishinaabe | Ottawa
Alternate forms: Odawa
Language(s): English | Ottawa
Date: 1947-1948, 2000
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Transcriptions and interlinear English translations by Howard Webkamigad of 13 Odawa (Anishinaabe) stories, 1 Odawa (annishinaabe) conversation, and 1 English story (transcription only), from wire recordings in Mss.Rec.1, "Ottawa material, 1947-1948."
Collection: Anishinaabe Language Tape Transcriptions of Anishinaabe Language Recordings by anishinaabe People from the Traverse Area of Michigan During the 1940s (Mss.SMs.Coll.20)

Arapaho
Alternate forms: Arapahoe
Language(s): Arapaho | English
Date: 1949-1952, 1962, 1967-1968, 1973-1974, 1976-1977, 1992, 1995-1996, 2000-2001
Type:Text
Extent: 814 pages
Description: The Arapaho materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 7 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Andrew Cowell, Orin T. Hatton, William Lewis Merrill, Willam K. Powers, Sue Roark-Calnek, Z. Salzmann, and William Weigel. These materials pertain to both Northern and Southern Arapaho. The materials by Cowell and Weigel relate to linguistic fieldwork for which there are accompnaying audio recordings, listed separately in this guide. Salzmann's material is also linguistic, containing a draft grammar of the language. The material by Hatton also relates to an extensive audio collection, "Ghost Dance-Era Songs of the Arapaho Crow Dance," also listed separately in this guide.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Caddo | Delaware | Choctaw | Chickasaw | Osage | Pascagoula | Natchez
Language(s): English
Date: 1804
Type:Text
Extent: 107 pages
Description: "Journal up the Red and Washita rivers, with William Dunbar, by order of the U.S. with list of common names of some of the trees and vegetables from the River Washita." No. 2 of Explorations in the Louisiana Country. Describes mounds near Natchez and on the Ouachita. Mentions Caddo trace; Captain Jacobs, a Delaware Indian; Chickasaws, Choctaws, Osages (Little Osages and Grand Osages) and Pascagoulas; warfare and raids; and the singing of a Choctaw woman mourning a child. Printed (abstract only) as Jefferson (1806). [See also Hunter journals #473, volumes 2, 3, 4, May 27, 1804-March 29, 1805.]
Collection: Mémoire sur le district du Ouachita dans la province de la Louisianne, [1803] (Mss.917.6.Ex7)

Catawba | Cherokee | Tutelo
Language(s): English | Catawba | Tutelo
Date: 1716; 1803; 1951-1997
Extent: 7 boxes
Description: The Catawba materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are primarily concentrated in Series II. These consist of copies of secondary sources such as an "Indian Vocabulary from Fort Christanna, 1716, Catawba census notes, 1830-1929, land claim agreements, and a dictionary of Place names in South Carolina. Original materials include hundreds of pages of Siebert's FIeld notes and a Catawba vocabulary / dictionary done with Wes Taukchiray.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Seneca
Language(s): English | Seneca
Date: 1936-1952
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume
Description: Musicological analysis, attempt to relate musical patterns to "present ritual functions," and some consideration of speculative questions of chronology and individual creativity.
Collection: Ceremonial Songs of the Tonawanda Seneca Longhouse (Mss.497.3.K965st)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1941-1946; 1951-1952
Extent: 1,652 pages, 920 slips, 59 phonograph discs, 4,500 cards
Description: The Cherokee materials in the ACLS collection consist of 3 sets of material located in the "Cherokee" section of the finding aid. The smallest item is Frans Olbrechts' brief essay comparing Cherokee and Ethiopic syllabaries. Two linguistic studies comprise the bulk of the remaining materials. Zellig Harris and John Witthoft's "Cherokee materials" was conducted in Philadelphia at the University of Pennsylvania and consists of grammatical Vocabularies and utterances, extensive grammatical notes and analyses, and numerous ethnographic and autobiographical stories, plus some songs, recorded on phonograph discs with Molly Sequoyah (mainly) and Will French. A small number of texts are written in the Cherokee syllabary as well. A second linguistic study by William Reyburn, conducted in Cherokee, N.C., consists of 1000+ pages of linguistic notes, transcriptions of recordings, and analyses, plus an extensive lexical file organized according to morpheme class. Reyburn's accompanying recordings are cataloged as Mss.Rec.16, "Cherokee materials gathered...on the Cherokee reservation at Cherokee, N.C.," listed separately in this guide.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Cherokee | Delaware | Yuchi | Creek | Seneca | Catawba | Choctaw
Alternate forms: Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1920-1951
Type:Text
Extent: 17 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Cherokee history and culture. This includes 24 pages of correspondence with Cherokee collaborators like Will West Long and Allen W. Long; 47 pages of field notes; notes and drafts relating to the preparation of Speck's manuscript on Cherokee music, dance, and drama; correspondence with colleagues such as George Herzog and Leonard Broom on Cherokee music, dance, and drama; correspondence with Franz Boas concerning copying of his Catawba texts and the Cherokee field work of Frans Olbrechts; correspondence with Will West Long about museum specimens; a biographical sketch of Will West Long; a postcard to Marian Godfrey regarding Cherokee Museum specimens; a letter to E. B. Norvell regarding silver trade goods and European imitations sold by the Cherokee; a bibliography of Cherokee sources, Publication 68650, listing 48 items, 1775-1922, prepared by the Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs; a copy of a 1566-1567 letter (7 pages in English, with introduction by Speck) written by Juan Pardo relating early Spanish contact with the Cherokee; an account of the Cherokee and Delaware alliance given by Witapanóxwe (War Eagle and James Webber); a transcription of an 1818 letter written by Charles Hicks on the manners and customs of the Cherokees; correspondence about Cherokee basketry; correspondence regarding the accuracy of material in Robert Strange, Eoneguski, or the Cherokee Chief (1939); and 27 pages of miscellanous notes.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)