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Delaware | Nanticoke | Pawnee | Shawnee | Cayuga | Mohawk | Haudenosaunee | Abenaki | Munsee | Tutelo
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Delaware
Date: 1895-1948
Extent: 57 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Delaware history, language, and culture. Speck's correspondence with Delaware collaborators in Oklahoma relating to Delaware history, ethnographic data, linguistics, museum specimens, and reservation affairs, etc., might be of particular interest; there are also several tales related by Witapanóxwe, or War Eagle, other tales and texts (some with interlineal translation) from Josiah Montour and other unknown contributors, and 11 sketches of Delaware art designs. Other correspondence touches on Speck's efforts to collect specimens (and individuals and institutions interested in acquiring them), his efforts to collect paintings and sketches of ceremonies and designs, his fieldwork and expenses, financial support from the University of Pennsylvania and Indiana Historical Society, Shawnee data on Oklahoma Delawares, the Big House Ceremony, efforts to acquire a Delaware Big House to erect in Harrisburg, Delawares-as-women, etc. There are also at least 82 pages (in three folders) of Speck's field notes of ethnographic and linguistic data, and over 50 pages (in two folders) of Speck's miscellaneous notes (including some correspondence) on topics such as Gladys Tantaquidgeon and Delaware designs, botanical specimens, linguistic materials, museum specimens, the Walam Olum, the Six Nation Delaware reservation, the celestial bear theme, native religion, reviews of Speck's publications, etc. Other notes cover Delaware grammar and vocabulary, Delaware clans and social organization, dualism in Delaware religion, the influence of Christianity on Delaware religion, the provenance of Delaware museum specimens obtained from Delawares in Oklahoma and Canada, biographical information on Joseph Montur and Nicodemus Peters, etc. There are also various drafts, essays, lectures and other writings by Speck on topics such as Delaware religion, ceremonies, peyote rites, designs, population, remnant populations in the east, history, place names, a Delaware bibliography and a notebook of reports to the University of Pennsylvania Research Committee on fieldwork among Oklahoma Delaware, St. Francis Abenaki, Munsee and Six Nations Delaware, Tutelo, Cayuga, 1931-1936.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Language(s): English
Date: 1940-1945
Extent: .1 linear feet
Description: This collection of memorabilia includes clippings, postcards (one from Marion H. Dickson), a brochure, and an arrow-head (a gift from the site to Murphy D. Smith, who deposited these materials at the APS). Images from a 1945 article in the Peoria Morning Star on the establishment of the new historical state park at the site include several striking photos of an excavated burial site (described as containing 230 skeletons of Mound-builders who died in a devastating epidemic), including one with of a school group at the burial site and another highlighting Dr. Don F. Dickson's method of leaving the dead in situ; a photo of the Dickson family farmstead (on which the Dickson mounds were located) before the establishment of the state park; and a photo of reconstructed pottery displayed in the museum. There is also a brochure about the site as a tourist and educational attraction with information on the history of the mounts, the Dickson Mound Museum, the work of the Dickson family (primarily Dr. Don F. Dickson, Marion H. Dickson, and Thomas M. Dickson), and the neighboring Payne Collection of artifacts. Several images of the excavated mass burial indicate that it was expected to be the main attraction to visitors, and it is called the "greatest display of stone age man in the world...230 skeletons left in original positions." Views of the burial site are also featured on the two postcards. The Dickson Mounds Museum is still a branch of the Illinois State Museum, and the Dickson Mounds are now understood to be a Mississippian cemetery complex associated with nearby village sites and a ceremonial center.
Collection: Dickson Mound (Lewistown, Ill.) Memorabilia (Mss.970.6.D56)

Hopi
Language(s): English | Hopi
Date: 1883-1892, 1920-1924, 1929-1932, 1936, 1938-1940
Extent: 24 notebooks, 300+ pages
Description: The Hopi materials in the Elsie Clews Parsons papers consist of a large amount of material found in several different section of the collection. In Subcollection I, Series II, "Notes, manuscripts, etc.", item 18 includes the notebooks of Alexander Stephen from 1885-1892; item 51 includes a significant number of photographs from Hopi communities from the period of 1918-1926; and items 46 and 61 also contain briefer manuscript materials relating to Hopi ceremonies. In Subcollection II, Series I, "Professional Correspondence", a number of Correspondences pertain to Hopi matters, particularly Parsons' correspondence with Franz Boas, Ruth Bunzel, Frederick Dellenbaugh, C. Daryll Forde, Robert H. Lowie, Leslie White, and Benjamin Whorf. In Subcollection II, Series III, "Lectures and Manuscripts", there are proofs and drafts related to Parsons' publication of Alexander Stephen's "Hopi Journal." In Subcollection II, Series IV, "Research Notes" there is a large number of Parsons' field notebooks from multiple visits to different Hopi communities. Some portion of this material may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity or privacy concerns.
Collection: Elsie Clews Parsons papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.29)

Language(s): English
Date: 1828-1884
Extent: 4 items
Description: 1) George Escol Sellers discusses stone artifacts; challenges theory of evolution from flaking to polishing of implements. Makes general comments. 2) Rubens Peale describes the visit of sixteen Indians to his museum, attracting many visitors. Gifts made to all Indians a week before. 3) Titian Ramsey Peale's "Sketch of Indian with bow, seated." 4) Morlot to Franklin Peale concerning fossil remains in Switzerland; ships box to him through the Smithsonian. Would like some Indian artifacts. Needs additional information on Indians. Sends copy of Morlot (1862).
Collection: Peale-Sellers Family Collection (Mss.B.P31)

Mohawk | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1943-1963
Extent: 5 items
Description: Materials relating to Paul A. W. Wallace's interest in Mohawk history and culture. Items include documents, newspaper clippings, and photographs regarding Wallace's adoption by the Akwesasne Mohawk Nation, including a copy of Ray Fadden's (Tehanetorens, Aren Akweks) speech; Wallace's correspondence with Glynn Michael regarding the death of Chief William Loft; Wallace's correspondence with Chief Julius Cook requesting Wallace's aid in defeating some unspecified Senate bills; Wallace's correspondence with John Fadden (Ka-Hon-Hes) regarding the exhibition and sale of John Fadden's paintings; and images (paintings, photographs) relating to Fadden's exhibition at State Museum, including works such as "Hunting Party Surprised by Bear," "Iroquois Delegation to the Aztecs," and "Youth Dreams of his Guardian Manito (an eagle)."
Collection: Paul A. W. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64b)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Saulteaux
Date: 1955-2011 (bulk 1992-2011)
Extent: 350+ hours; 2500+ photographs; 100+ documents
Description: Audio recordings, photographs, and born-digital manuscripts documenting Ojibwe communities and individuals primarily in Manitoba and Ontario, with a smaller number from Minnesota and Wisconsin. Subject matter includes the photographs and ethnography of A. Irving Hallowell in these communities in the 1930s, thunderbirds, memegwesiwag, Ojibwe language, religion, ceremonies, and other traditions. The main communities concerned are Berens River, Pauingassi, Little Grand Rapids, Pikangikum, Poplar Hill, and Jackhead. The majority of the audio materials are interviews recorded in the context of producing radio documentaries for CBC Radio One from the early 1990s through late 2000s. (See Series I, Subseries 12 for the broadcast version of these documentaries.) Transcripts for both the finished documentaries and some of the interviews are located in Series II. Photographs taken during Matthews' visits to indigenous communities, museums, and other locations can be found in Series III.
Collection: Maureen Matthews Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.164)

Penobscot | Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Mi'kmaq | Haudenosaunee | Abenaki | Delaware | Mohegan | Mohican | Zuni | Navajo | Tutelo | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Micmac, Lenape, Mahican, Malecite
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1908-1947
Extent: 27 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Penobscot language, history, and culture, and his preparation of his book Penobscot Man. This includes several folders of Speck's field notes, notes organized around specific topics (including data not used in Speck's published works), copies and drafts of lectures and essays, correspondence, etc. Topics include Penobscot social organization, calendar system, house furnishings, hunting morality, animal lore, religion, art, sayings, alphabet, counting and measuring, canoe-making, face-painting, texts with interlineal translations, and "Bird Lore of the Northern Indians" (a faculty public lecture at the University of Pennsylvania). Additionally, significant correspondence concerns the preparation, expenses, dissemination, and reception of his Penobscot publications. Other topics of correspondence include Ethel Gandy's monograph on Penobscot art; names of chiefs and their clans; "clown" performances outside of the southwest among the Penobscot, Iroquois [Haudenosaunee], Abenaki, and Delaware; place names; the relationship of Penobscot-Mohegan and Mahican; a comparison of Zuni-Navajo and Red Paint; Tutelo. There is a particularly large folder of Speck's miscellaneous Penobscot notes containing both a variety of notes and correspondence from Penobscot consultants as well as non-Native colleagues. These include letters from Roland E. Nelson (Needahbeh, Penobscot) concerning drum for exhibit; letters from Nelson, Franz Boas, John M. Cooper, William B. Goodwin, E. V. McCollum, and J. Dyneley Prince, all concerning Penobscot Man; Clifford P. Wilson concerning moosehair embroidery; Edward Reman concerning Norse influence on Penobscot; Carrie A. Lyford concerning moose-wool controversy and Ann Stimson's report; Ann Stimson, letter of thanks; Henry Noyes Otis concerning genealogy of Indians named Sias on Cape Cod (Speck marked this Penobscot); Princess Pretty Woman (Passamaquoddy) concerning her dress (apparently at the Penn Museum); Dorothy Ranco (Penobscot) concerning Princess Pretty Woman's dress; Roland W. Mann, concerning site of Indian occupancy according to Penobscot tradition; Ryuzo Torii, letter of introduction. Other miscellaneous items include a 5-page transcript of agreements between Indians of Nova Scotia and the English, August 15, 1749; 2 pages, transcript of agreement of July 13, 1727 (letter of transmittal, Lloyd Price to Miss MacDonald, September 24, 1936); Ann K. Stimson, Moose Wool and Climbing Powers of the American Mink; miscellaneous field notes on topics like songs, kinship, totem, medicine, and social units; and 4 pages of Penobscot words and their cultural use.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Seneca | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Seneca
Date: Bulk 1930s-1990s
Extent: 15+ linear feet
Description: Seneca materials make up the majority of the Fenton papers and can be found throughout all sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with numerous people on Seneca matters. Noteworthy Seneca correspondents include Simeon Gibson, Clara Redeye, Sherman Redeye, and other individuals such as those listed above. The largest body of material is in Series V, which includes Fenton's notebooks and other documentation from field work at Allegany, Cattaraugus, Tonawanda, and Grand River, beginning in the 1930s through late in his career. This section also includes extensive card files on "Materia Medica" or ethnobotanical information, and Seneca place names. Series VI consists of over 1000 photographs, the majority of which are from Seneca communities in the 1930s-1950s. Series VIII includes additional field notes and other materials derived mainly from his 1930s fieldwork. Significant portions of these materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity, as Fenton's materials frequently pertain to areas of sacred traditional knowledge.
Collection: William N. Fenton papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.20)

Zuni
Alternate forms: Zuñi
Language(s): English | Zuni
Date: 1880-1881, 1915-1924, 1932
Extent: 300+ pages, 44 notebooks, 18 photographs
Description: The Zuni materials in the Elsie Clews Parsons papers numerous materials found in multiple sections of the finding aid for the collection, primarily Subcollection I, Series II, "Notes, manuscripts, etc.", Subcollection II, Series I, "Professional Correspondence", Subcollection II, Series III, "Lectures and Manuscripts", Subcollection II, Series IV, "Research Notes", and Subcollection II, Series IV, "Photographs and Scrapbooks." Some of this material may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity or privacy concerns. Additional relevant material may appear in correspondence folders.
Collection: Elsie Clews Parsons papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.29)