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Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Wolastoqiyik | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki | Atikamekw
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Tete de Boule, Wolastoqiyik
Date: 1914-1930
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Hallowell Papers are mostly located in Series V, Research Files, in folders labled "Abenaki" and Series VI, Photographs, Subseries E "St. Francis Abenaki Album." These include linguistic, ethnographic, ethnobotanical, ceremonial knowledge, information on political organization, and historical materials. Of particular interest are a sketch of Abenaki history from 1600-1930 accompanied by detailed notes from secondary sources on 17th century Abenaki history. The linguistic materials include an analysis of how the language changed after contact with Catholic missionaries, Abenaki vocabulary related to body parts, Abenaki phonetics, and religious, medical, and kinship terminology. The ethnobotanical materials include a manuscript labled "Identity of animals and plants," and information concerning herbal medicine and its practitioners. There is a wealth of ethnographic materials that include drawings of pipes, descriptions of games, baketry and birch bark maks. There is descriptions of Abenaki music and diagrams of dances, as well as detailed descriptions of hunting techniques. Some of the genealogical materials contains lists of community members names and descriptions of marriage. Interspered throughout the folders labled "Abenaki" in the Research Files are interlinear translations of stories such as "Man who could Find Lost Objects," "Woman and Bear Lover" and numerous other stories. The materials on hunting include topics such as the use of snow shoes, preparation of moose hide,and techniques and drawings of trapping. The collections contain important information designation hunting territories and family names. Four folders contain detailed informaiton on kinship terms. Two folders on Measurements and Genealogical data contain lists of names. The folders labled "Linguistics" in Series V contain scattered information about Abenaki grammar. In Series VI, of 160 photographs taken at St. Francis, Odanak in the Centre-du-Québec region. The Abenaki people in the photographs are identified, in most cases, and also include depictions of traditional dress, buildings, clothing, baskets, and a wide variety of material culture. The correspondence, in Series I, includes letters from Theophile Panadis; Gordon Day describing his collection of stories, recordings, vocabularies, and hunting territories. Henry Lorne Masta, one of Hallowell's Abenaki consultants, writes about culture and language. Additional correspondents may contain other Abenaki-related information.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Squamish
Alternate forms: Sḵwx̱wú7mesh
Language(s): English | Squamish
Date: 1976
Extent: 179 pages
Description: This paper, co-authored by Nancy J. Turner and Randall (Randy) T. Bouchard, gives the comparative linguistic transcriptions of the native plant names, the botanical identification, and the common English-language names of the plant species, as well as their utilization as food or in technology, medicine, or mythology. Includes photographs. See also the other volumes in the same series in the APS collections: Bouchard and Dorothy I. D. Kennedy's "Knowledge and usage of land mammals, birds, insects, reptiles, and amphibians by the Squamish Indian people of British Columbia" (1976) (Mss.970.6.K38.k); and Bouchard and Kennedy's "Utilization of fish, beach foods, and marine mammals by the Squamish Indian people of British Columbia" (1976) (Mss.970.6.K38). These publications were disseminated by the British Columbia Language Project.
Collection: Botany of the Squamish Indian people of British Columbia (Mss.970.6.B66)

Catawba | Cherokee | Tutelo
Language(s): English | Catawba | Tutelo
Date: 1716; 1803; ca. 1925-1931; 1951-1997
Extent: 7 boxes
Description: The Catawba materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are primarily concentrated in Series II. These consist of copies of secondary sources such as an "Indian Vocabulary from Fort Christanna, 1716, Catawba census notes, 1830-1929, land claim agreements, and a dictionary of Place names in South Carolina. Original materials include hundreds of pages of Siebert's FIeld notes and a Catawba vocabulary / dictionary done with Wes Taukchiray. There are also 14 sound recordings made with Sally Gordon in Series XII.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Greenlandic
Language(s): English
Date: 1933, 1984-1985
Subject: Medicine | Fishing
Extent: 1 folder and 3 photographic negatives
Description: Two items in the Baruch Blumberg papers are identified as being from East Greenland. In Series XIV. Photographic Materials are three negatives of unidentified Greenlandic people fishing in Kûngmiut (Kuummiit) and Quarmiut, taken by Gert Nooder and from the Rijksmuseum voor Volkenkunde, Leiden, Netherlands. In Series VI. Works by Blumberg is an essay titled "Hepatitis B Virus and Sex Ratio of Offspring in East Greenland".
Collection: Baruch S. Blumberg Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.144)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1905-1956
Extent: 44 folders; 1 box
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately 45 items directly pertaining to the Inuit (formerly Eskimos) have been identified. Wallace was particularly interested in arctic hysteria (piblokto) among the Inuit and other polar populations, and 27 folders of research materials on this topic can be found in Series VII. Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute. Of particular interest might be the images in Series XII. Graphics, which include 13 folders of images of individuals (and some dogs) going about normal activites and--at another time--suffering from arctic hysteria. There is also a copy of Wallace's "Interdisciplinary Approaches to Mental Disorder Among the Polar Eskimos of Northwest Greenland" in Series IV. Works by Wallace A. Professional; several copies of articles by other scholars on Inuit and other arctic populations in Series VI. Consulting and Committee Work B. U.S.-Soviet Commission on Anthropology; and one box of research notecards in Series III. Notecards. Among Wallace's many correspondents, files for Robert Ackerman, the American Philosophical Society, the Arctic Health Research Center, the Arctic Institute of North America, Edmund Snow Carpenter, Nancy Yaw Davis, David Landy, Raymond Neutra, and Douglas Oliver include references to Inuits and other Arctic peoples. See the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career, and for an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Language(s): English
Date: 1908-1929
Extent: 3 folders
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. There are Inuit (formerly Eskimo) materials located in Series I. Trait Files. These include Folder "A:974 x 98. Caucasian x Eskimo" (1927), which contains correspondence (with sketches) of Herbert B. Wentz, M.D. to Harry H. Laughlin of the Eugenics Research Association, largely about the occurence of pigmentation in children of white and Native parents, but also with Wentz's descriptions of the unfair treatment toward Native Alaskans in medicine, education, and the reindeer industry. Folder "A:979 x 80. Caucasian - Eskimo" (1919) contains a single, brief anecdotal paragraph about an Inuit woman married to a white man. Folder "A:9798. Eskimos" (1908-1929) contains several newspaper clippings and articles (from Harpers, World's Work, The Literary Digest, The New York Times, etc.) relating to the Inuit, including Vilhjalmr Stefansson's article "Wintering Among the Eskimos"; newspaper clippings showing Mrs. Frank E. Kleinschmidt sharing a meal with Inuit women and children, Mrs. Kleinschmidt with an Inuit hunter, and an Inuit girl; Robert J. Flaherty's article "Wetalltooks' Islands: How the Remarkable Information and Native Map of One Wetalltook, an Esquimo, Suggested the Belcher Island Expedition" (with photos); Flaherty's article "How I Flimed 'Nanook of the North'" (with photos); "Knud Rasmussen's Artic Odyssey: The First of Two Articles by the Leader of the Fifth Thule Expedition" (with photos); William A. Thomas's "Health of a Carnivorous Race: A Study of the Eskimo"; a New York Times spread on Earl Rossman's expedition in Nunivak (with photos); Stefansson's "The 'Blond' Eskimos"; "Eskimos Under their Skin, as seen by Rasmussen" (with photos); and three pages of references to mentions of Eskimos in medical journals, two from the Journal of Immunology, Baltimore and one from Ugeskrift for Laeger, Copenhagen.
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Haudenosaunee | Onondaga | Mohawk | Tuscarora | Oneida | Cayuga | Seneca | Lenape
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1940
Extent: 16 panels (oversized)
Description: Designer and author Ray Fadden (Aren Akweks, Tehanetorens) was a member of the Wolf Clan of the Mohawk community of Akwesasne and founder of the Six Nations Indian Museum of Onchiota, New York. As an educator, Fadden created “educational charts” to convey elements of Haudenosaunee history and culture to audiences. Early on, he enlisted the help of his son, John Fadden. Later, others were brought in to create other charts. This particular chart or poster is signed by Sagotaoala (Bob Gabor). It is comprised of four parts (photocopies of the original). Seen as a whole, the central feature of the poster is a map of Haudenosaunee territory in present-day New York State, showing the relative locations of the six nations of the Iroquois League (Haudenosaunee: Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, Mohawk, and Tuscarora) and overlaid with drawings relating to Haudenosaunee history and culture. This central image is ringed with many more sketches, and around the edges the chart is bordered wtih different wampum belt designs. The sketches range from small and simple to fairly large and elaborate, and feature important people, events, places, material culture items, etc. from Haudenosaunee history and culture. This includes drawings of people like Hiawatha, Joseph Brant, Mary Jemison, etc.; material culture items like a water drum, body armor, pottery, etc.; scenes from daily life such as hunting, playing lacrosse, and a medicine man harvesting tobacco, etc.; more specific events like councils, warfare, a Dutch massacre of Delaware neighbors, and the arrival of the Tuscarora; and more recent happenings like Akwesasne Club Members on an outing and the role of Indian steel-workers in the construction of the "Rainbow Bridge" acress the Niagara River. Along with the 4-panel complete educational poster, there are 2 panels with miscellanous drawings along the edges, less polished and less specific than in the completed version, and 2 panels that together comprise a map of New York State and environs, and have the same kinds of drawings as the other two posters (albeit less polished than the 4-panel poster but more polished than in the other 2-panel item). Included in this folder are negatives of each of the 8 panels described.
Collection: Iroquois past and present in the state of New York, presented by the Akwesasne Mohawk counselor organization (Mss.970.3.F12i)

A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi | Ndau | Zulu | Heiltsuk
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Date: 1893-1951
Extent: Approx. 10,000 loose pages, 10 notebooks, 7000+ cards, 10+ maps
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the ACLS collection are located predominantly in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all materials (other relevant sections are "Northwest Coast", "Bella Bella (Heitsuk)", and item AfBnd.4 in "Non-American and non-linguistic material"). Some of the larger individual sets of materials listed within this section also have their own specific tables of contents (available upon request) detailing their often highly diverse contents. Overall, the vast majority of the material is made of of 1) manuscripts sent to Boas by George Hunt from the 1890s to the 1930s, frequently in both Kwak'wala and English, covering a very broad range of Kwakwaka'wakw history, culture, languages, customs, and traditions; and 2) field work materials recorded by Boas and Boas' own analyses of material sent by Hunt, covering a similar range of topics. Additional materials by other individuals focus especially on linguistic and ethnographic matters. Also see the guide entry "Kwakiutl materials, Franz Boas Papers" for information on the correspondence between Boas and Hunt, which gives additional context to the materials in the ACLS collection.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Lakota
Language(s): English | Lakota
Date: 1966-1970, 1976, 1992-1995, 2012-2015
Extent: 863 pages; 64 slides
Description: The Lakota materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 14 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Green, Harbeck, Kilroe, Merrill, Pollak, Potts, Powers, Price, Sistrunk, Wagoner, and Znamenski.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Cherokee | Apache | Caddo | Calusa | Ojibwe | Choctaw | Lenape | Gwich'in | Haudenosaunee | Inuit | Karankawa | Mattaponi | Meskwaki | Muscogee | Navajo | Onondaga | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Oceti Sakowin | Sahtú | Timucua | Tuscarora | Tutelo | Wyandot | Zuni
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Creek, Eskimo, Fox, Kuchin, Kutchin, Loucheux, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Mvskoke, Sauk, Huron, Wendat
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1945; 1947-Circa 1961; 1951-1962;
Extent: Circa 350 volumes; 75 photographs; 75 newspaper clippings; 70 manuscripts
Description: This collection pertains principally to the Cherokees of North Carolina and Oklahoma and to their language, ethnography, folklore, archeology, history, music, etc. Includes Indian studies and correspondence by Gillespie, notes on Indian dances and linguistics, bibliographies, publications of the Archaeological Society of Brigham Young University, and newspaper clippings. Also comprised of materials on: Apache, Calusa, Chippewa, Choctaw, Delaware, Eskimo, Fox, Haudenosaunee, Karankawa, Gwich'in, Mattaponi, Muskogee, Navajo, Onondaga, Sauk, Seminole, Seneca, Shawnee, Sioux, Slave, Timucua, Tuscarora, Tutelo, Wyandot, and Zuni. Contains: Gillespie, "A grammar of western dialect of Cherokee language of the Iroquoian family," 1949-1954 (131 pages); "Miscellaneous material on the Cherokee Indians and language"; "Miscellaneous items pertaining to the American Indian."
Collection: Miscellaneous items pertaining to the American Indian (Mss.497.3.G41)