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Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1941-1946; 1951-1952
Extent: 1,652 pages, 920 slips, 59 phonograph discs, 4,500 cards
Description: The Cherokee materials in the ACLS collection consist of 3 sets of material located in the "Cherokee" section of the finding aid. The smallest item is Frans Olbrechts' brief essay comparing Cherokee and Ethiopic syllabaries. Two linguistic studies comprise the bulk of the remaining materials. Zellig Harris and John Witthoft's "Cherokee materials" was conducted in Philadelphia at the University of Pennsylvania and consists of grammatical Vocabularies and utterances, extensive grammatical notes and analyses, and numerous ethnographic and autobiographical stories, plus some songs, recorded on phonograph discs with Molly Sequoyah (mainly) and Will French. A small number of texts are written in the Cherokee syllabary as well. A second linguistic study by William Reyburn, conducted in Cherokee, N.C., consists of 1000+ pages of linguistic notes, transcriptions of recordings, and analyses, plus an extensive lexical file organized according to morpheme class. Reyburn's accompanying recordings are cataloged as Mss.Rec.16, "Cherokee materials gathered...on the Cherokee reservation at Cherokee, N.C.," listed separately in this guide.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Kumeyaay
Alternate forms: Kumeyaay, Diegueño, Kamia, Tipai-Ipai
Language(s): English | Kumiai
Date: 1963-1964
Extent: 3 sound tape reels (6 hr., 34 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Field recordings made with Kumiai / Kumeyaay (Diegueño) speakers from numerous communities in San Diego County, California, and Sonora, Mexico. Primarily consists of traditional stories, including Coyote stories. Also includes Vocabularies, conversations, description of the preparation of acorns for food, identification of museum artifacts, and an extended account of the Mission Indian Federation. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Diegueño texts (Mss.Rec.76)

Hopi | Hopi-Tewa | Tewa
Language(s): English | Hopi
Date: 1965
Extent: 3 sound tape reels (2 hr., 51 min.)
Description: Conversations regarding Hopi dance and Tewa pottery and music. Some of these materials may be restricted due cultural sensitivity and privacy considerations.
Collection: Hopi-Tewa Recordings (Mss.Rec.59)

Haudenosaunee | Seneca
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Seneca
Date: 1973
Extent: 11 sound tape reels (29 hr., 41 min.)
Description: Interviews and discussions with the Seneca artist Ernest Smith on his paintings of Seneca customs, stories, ceremonies, crafts, food preparation, and other traditional ways. Smith was a Seneca from the Tonawanda Reservation in New York state. The paintings were done in the 1930s and are presently in the Rochester Museum and Science Center in Rochester, New York. The recordings were made by William N. Fenton and his student, Jeanette Collamer, in 1973 at the museum in Rochester. The paintings are referred to on the recordings by the museum's catalog numbers for the paintings. Some of the paintings do not have assigned titles. Sound quality is fair overall, with severe distortion and prominent background noise on the final tape. Most of the recordings are restricted due to potential cultural sensitivity.
Collection: Interviews concerning the paintings of the Seneca artist Ernest Smith (Mss.Rec.126)

Lummi | Nooksack
Language(s): Salish, Straits | English
Date: 1974
Extent: 20 sound tape reels (21 hr., 29 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Linguistic field recordings, recorded in Whatcom County, Washington, June - August 1974, with consultant Al Charles. Includes stories relating to Lummi history, descriptions of social customs, descriptions of museum artifacts, descriptions of how to prepare various kinds of traditional foods, and elicited sentences. Majority of material given in Lummi and later reviewed and translated. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Lummi recordings (Mss.Rec.105)

Maya | Mixe | Zuni | Tzeltal
Date: 1963-1995
Description: The Maya materials in the Lounsbury Papers are extensive. The correspondence in Series I includes a Motul (Mayan) dictionary, discussion about translating Maya glyphs and calendrical calculations, the Popol Vuh. Series II consists of articles and manuscripts from a project identified as "Maya kinship unfin. project." Much of this work is focused on interpreting Maya hieroglyphs. In Series VII there are a number of recordings of Yucatec Maya made in the 1960s focused on vocabulary. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a dictionary by Rene Acuna, Lloyd Anderson's Etymologies of Mayan calendrical and astronomical terms, Anthony Aveni's interpretation of Maya hieroglyphs, Brent Berlin's decipherment of Maya hieroglyphs, Gordon Brotherston's comments on FGL's manuscript on Maya dates, Lyle Campbell's bibliography of Mayan linguistics, Wallace Chafe on how FGL got into the study of Maya hieroglyphics, Michael Coe's report that Soviets were successful in using a computer to translate Maya hieroglyphs, R. David Drucker's comparison of Aztec and Maya calendars, Dieter Dutting on Maya hieroglyphs; transformational analysis of Yucatec.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Saulteaux
Date: 1955-2011 (bulk 1992-2011)
Extent: 350+ hours; 2500+ photographs; 100+ documents
Description: Audio recordings, photographs, and born-digital manuscripts documenting Ojibwe communities and individuals primarily in Manitoba and Ontario, with a smaller number from Minnesota and Wisconsin. Subject matter includes the photographs and ethnography of A. Irving Hallowell in these communities in the 1930s, thunderbirds, memegwesiwag, Ojibwe language, religion, ceremonies, and other traditions. The main communities concerned are Berens River, Pauingassi, Little Grand Rapids, Pikangikum, Poplar Hill, and Jackhead. The majority of the audio materials are interviews recorded in the context of producing radio documentaries for CBC Radio One from the early 1990s through late 2000s. (See Series I, Subseries 12 for the broadcast version of these documentaries.) Transcripts for both the finished documentaries and some of the interviews are located in Series II. Photographs taken during Matthews' visits to indigenous communities, museums, and other locations can be found in Series III.
Collection: Maureen Matthews Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.164)

Abenaki | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1669; 1678; 1725-1796; 1809-1884; 1900-1995
Extent: 12 linear feet; 3 hrs. (audio)
Description: The Penobscot materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are concentrated in Series III. Siebert collected census material, treaties and treaty minutes, placenames, with a strong representation of songs, stories, and linguistic materials. There are detailed notes about Indian claims in Maine and genealogical information. There are also educational materials for the teaching of the Penobscot language as well as a wealth of information on Penobscot linguistics. Series V, Siebert's notebooks, have extensive grammatical, phonetic, and vocabulary of the Penobscot language. Both Series III and V reflect Siebert's deep interest in the history of Maine and the Eastern Abenaki including archaeological, pre-history, and colonial era documents such as the Eliot Bible, which Siebert owned a rare copy in his library, which was sold at auction. Series VI and VII contain various drafts of essays on Penobscot culture, language, and history. Series XII contains approximately 3 hours of Penobscot language recordings, primarily from the 1930s and 1950s.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Yupik
Alternate forms: Yup'ik
Language(s): English | Yupik, Central
Date: 1995-1996
Extent: 61 sound tape reels (50 hr., 8 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Portrait of Nash Harbor, Nunivak Island (Mss.Rec.252)

Anishinaabe | Potawatomi
Alternate forms: Pottawotomi
Language(s): English | Potawatomi
Date: 1992
Extent: 16 audiocassettes (18 hr., 4 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Recordings of the Potawatomi language made with speakers Ella Louis, Julia Wesaw, and Martin Wesaw. Most of the recordings consist of interview sessions that include elicitation of miscellaneous Potawatomi words and phrases, as well as words for animals, birds, and household items. Some of the interviews also discussions of various topics such as basket-making, berry picking, pottery, and cooking, and autobiographical stories about boarding school, racial discrimination, military service, speaking Potawatomi, and other topics. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Potawatomi language recordings (Mss.Rec.193)