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Lenca
Language(s): Lenca | English | Spanish | French
Date: 1990s
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: Daythal Kendall gathered together lexica from various published sources of Lenca (including Ephraim Squier) into a computer database, from which he printed a number of different alphabetizations that were never professionally published. These can be found in his Research series (Series 2), and are of great potential use. Both Honduran and Salvadoran Lenca appear to be represented, although speaker names are only partially identified. He also visited Honduras in 1993 partially in an effort to find and interview Lenca speakers. Additional Lenca may be found in Series 1, among correspondence and materials from the Penutian language workshops.
Collection: Daythal L. Kendall Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.148)

Maya | Mixe | Zuni | Tzeltal
Date: 1963-1995
Description: The Maya materials in the Lounsbury Papers are extensive. The correspondence in Series I includes a Motul (Mayan) dictionary, discussion about translating Maya glyphs and calendrical calculations, the Popol Vuh. Series II consists of articles and manuscripts from a project identified as "Maya kinship unfin. project." Much of this work is focused on interpreting Maya hieroglyphs. In Series VII there are a number of recordings of Yucatec Maya made in the 1960s focused on vocabulary. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a dictionary by Rene Acuna, Lloyd Anderson's Etymologies of Mayan calendrical and astronomical terms, Anthony Aveni's interpretation of Maya hieroglyphs, Brent Berlin's decipherment of Maya hieroglyphs, Gordon Brotherston's comments on FGL's manuscript on Maya dates, Lyle Campbell's bibliography of Mayan linguistics, Wallace Chafe on how FGL got into the study of Maya hieroglyphics, Michael Coe's report that Soviets were successful in using a computer to translate Maya hieroglyphs, R. David Drucker's comparison of Aztec and Maya calendars, Dieter Dutting on Maya hieroglyphs; transformational analysis of Yucatec.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Huastec | Purépecha | Tarahumara | Otomi
Language(s): English | Spanish | French
Date: 1802-1899
Type:Text
Extent: 22 items
Description: Materials relating to the indigenous cultures and languages of Mexico. Includes requests to view or borrow materials at APS, particularly in the Poinsett Collection; introductions of scholars who wish to view Mexican materials to the Librarian or other appropriate official of the time (including John Vaughan and George Ord); solicitations for donations of Mexican materials, particularly from Joel R. Poinsett; donation of linguistic and other materials from Jose Joaquin de Ferrer;s relating to indigenous cultures and languages of Mexico, particularly Brinton's papers on Nagualism and on Fuegian languages [Brinton (1892) and Brinton (1894)], Valentini's manuscript on Mexican calendar stone, and linguistic work by Albert Gallatin; Mexican antiquities at other institutions such as the Academy of Natural Sciencies, Princeton, and the Peabody Museum; and Samuel Morton's offer to George Ord to exchange books for a Mexican skull he used for a plate in his Crania Americana (1839), and which he now wishes to add to his collection. Specific cultures or languages mentioned include Huastec, Otomi, Tarascan, Tarahumara, and Mexican. Individuals mentioned include Ephraim G. Squier, Bishop Anders, Mr. Frank, Professor Matile, Mr. Bagely, Thomas Sully, Jean-Frédéric Waldeck, and Lord Kingsborough.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Nahua
Alternate forms: Aztec
Date: 1912-1924, 1928, 1930, 1940, 1949-1950, 1953
Type:Text
Extent: 359 pages, Circa 750 slips, 1 notebook (314 pages), 1 volume (168 pages)
Description: The Nahua materials in the ACLS collection consist of numerous items in the "Nahuatl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing. Prominent materials include texts recorded by Boas from Milpa Alta speakers, including Doña Luz Jiménez, in 1912. There are also additional texts, recorded by Miguel Barrios Espinosa in 1950 San Juan Tlilhuacan, Delegacion de Azcapotzales, Mexico City. Boas and Mason's "Nahautl vocabulary" contains 750+ word slips based upon work by Simeón and Mason. "Vocabulares Nawatl" by Leon and Swadesh consists of vocabulary of 3 Nahuatl dialects (identified as Telina, Ilamalan, and San Pedro [Atocpan?]) based on field work in 1939 with 4 speakers. There are additional grammatical studies and linguistic treatments by Whorf, Barlow, Croft, and Ripley. Some Nahuatl vocabulary can also be found in comparative Uto-Aztecan materials in the "Uto-Aztecan" section of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)