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Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway
Language(s): Chippewa | English
Date: 1980-1990
Extent: 27 audiocassettes (21 hr., 27 min.)
Description: This collection consists of audio recordings of Larry Aitken (Bezhigoogahbow), a distinguished Ojibwe elder, teacher, and traditional knowledge keeper of Leech Lake, Minnesota. The recordings include numerous public speeches, classroom lectures and discussions, and interviews on Anishinaabe spiritual teachings, health, psychology, cultural strength, history, and language. A number of recordings were made with Aitken's teacher, Jim Jackson, a medicine man and traditional knowledge keeper with whom Aitken worked for 17 years.
Collection: Larry Aitken audio recordings (Mss.Rec.288)

Ojibwe | Anishinaabe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Chippewa
Language(s): Chippewa | English
Date: 1996
Extent: 8 sound tape reels (4 hr., 14 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Recordings made in Hessel, Michigan from August to October of 1996, collected by Deborah Davis Jackson. Tapes 1-7 consists of elicitations of Ojibwe words and phrases. Tape 8 contains a life-historical interview with a brother and sister. Recording sessions were conducted by Ted Holappa, with consultant speakers who were given pseudonyms for the recordings. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Ojibwa discursive practices in the Eastern Upper Peninsula of Michigan (Mss.Rec.263)

Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway
Language(s): Chippewa | English
Date: 1938; 1951-1952
Extent: 253 pages, 26 cards, 2 maps
Description: The Ojibwe materials in the ACLS collection consist of two items in the "Ojibwa" section of the finding aid. One is Swadesh's "Chippewa field notes," which includes a story and other language information given by Ted St. Germaine of Lac du Flambeau, who attended the Carlisle Indian School, obtained a law degree at Yale in 1913, played as a tackle in the NFL in 1922, became the first Native American admitted to the bar in Wisconsin, and later served as tribal judge for Lac du Flambeau. This section also includes Joe Pierce's "Shawnee, Kickapoo, Ojibwa, Sauk-and-Fox materials," containing discussion of dialect and language relationships, translations of texts, tests, and degree of linguistic relationships. (The Ojibwe in Pierce's work is that spoken at Mount Pleasant.) In the "Northeast" section of the finding aid, two maps annotated by hand by Speck include linguistic and hunting territories, include that for Ojibwe groups.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Saulteaux
Date: 1932-1949
Description: The Ojibwe materials in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers are extensive. Hallowell focused on three regions of Ojibwe territory: Berens River in north, central Canada (Pikangikum, Pauingassi, Poplar River; Little Grand Rapids First Nations) and Lac du Flambeau in Wisconsin. Hallowell was particularly interested in psychological anthropology. Both the Berens River and Lac du Flambeau materials in Series V, for example, includes ethnographic information on taboos, incest regulations, Rorschach tests, dreams, and acculturation. Hallowell's interests in traditional knowledge are represented by descriptions of the practice of the Midewiwin religion; traditional stories about Wisakedjak and Tcakabec/Chakabesh, Memegwesiug, Windigos, and Thunderbirds. Of particular interest in the Lac du Flambeau materials are hundred of pages of family biographies in Series V and photographs with the names of community members in Series VI, Subseries B. Of particular interest in the Berens River materials are maps of traditional hunting grounds, a diagram of Ojibwe cosmology, an autobiography by Hallowell's collaborator Chief William Berens, 29 folders of "Saulteaux Indians--Myths and Tales" all in Series V. There are hundreds of photographs from the region, with many community members identified, and all digitized, in Series VI, Subseries A. The correspondence, in Series I, includes Robert Ritzenhaler's description of a shaking tent ceremony by Ojibwe in Wisconsin; a detailed account of Joseph Fiddler's trial for murdering a windigo in the folder labled Royal Canadian Mounted Police; papers sent by Morton Teicher detailing incidents of windigo in Canada (50+ pages); a letter from Frances Densmore describing a shaking tent ceremony; and several letters from Chief William Berens providing information about Ojibwe people in the photographs in Series VI.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway
Language(s): Chippewa | English
Date: circa 1820s
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 9 pages
Description: The Chippewa or Ojibwe materials in this collection consist of manuscript Vocabularies listed in the finding aid as items 20, 21, 22a, and 22b.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Historical and Literary Committee, American Indian Vocabulary Collection    (Mss.497.V85)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Potawatomi | Seneca | Penobscot
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa
Date: circa 1925-1967, bulk circa 1940-1941
Type:Text
Extent: 32 folders
Description: Several items relating to the Ojibwe (Ojibwa, Chippewa) language have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. They are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II. In Subcollection I, they include relevant correspondence with John N. Seaman (regarding Chippewa fieldwork in Michigan and consultants Mr. Maidler [Medler?] and Charlie David) and a partial letter with Ojibwe text in the Unidentified folder; 6 boxes of Ojibwe notecards, 1 box of Seneca, Ojibwe and Penobscot notecards, and 2 folders of Ojibwe notes (mostly vocabulary and linguistic, but one slip notes addresses of consultants Nicholas Plain of Sarnia and Elijah Pinnance of Walpole Island--there is also, unexpectedly, a bibliography for sources on Arawakan languages at the end of Ojibwa #4) in Series II. comparative vocabularies of Ojibwe and Potawatomi ("Pottowatomi") in Series V. Research Notes Subseries V-A: Language Notes; unbound Eastern Ojibwe texts ("The Walpole Island" and others) in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-B: Text; and 24 folders of Ojibwe notebooks in Series VI. Notebooks. Contents of the Blackfoot and Ojibwe notebooks in this series were described in detail by Richard A. Rhodes in 1988. Blackfoot and Ojibwe notebooks are arranged in the order of Rhodes' list, a photocopy of which is filed in the first Blackfoot folder. In general the Ojibwe notebooks are full of vocabulary words and phrases on all kinds of topics, notes on various parts of speech, notes on dialects, texts both with and without English translations, etc. Several consultants are named, of which Angeline Williams is the most prominent [see Odawa entry for more on Angeline Williams]. At least some of these materials appear to be associated with the Linguistic Institute and might be the work of students. Materials in Subcollection II include correspondence with Leonard Bloomfield (letters written in Ojibwe, with some interlinear English translation) and John N. Seaman (regarding field work with Chippewa speakers in Oscoda, Michigan, including Dan Naganigan and his wife and Mrs. Silas) in Series I. Correspondence. Series II. Research Notes, Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian contains 19 folders of Ojibwe materials collected from Leonard Bloomfield, Angeline Williams, Andrew Medler, Dan Nakanikan and Mrs. John B. Silas, including dozens of texts and stories and Bloomfield's Vocabularies and notes on topics such as prefixes and suffixes and sentence structure [see finding aid for titles of texts and stories]. There are also Ojibwe examples in at least 6 folders ("Č and K," "L and M," "N and P," " Š and T," "Θ and ?" and "Specimens of Central Algonquian") of the many Comparative Algonquian notebooks in the same subseries (i.e., Macro-Algonquian). Finally, there is "Correspondence in Ojibwa: Charles F. Voegelin and Leonard Bloomfield" in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries I: General works; and "Ojibwe grammar" by Leonard Bloomfield and "The Chippewa Noun System" by John N. Seaman in Series IV. Works by Others.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Saulteaux
Date: 1955-2011 (bulk 1992-2011)
Extent: 350+ hours; 2500+ photographs; 100+ documents
Description: Audio recordings, photographs, and born-digital manuscripts documenting Ojibwe communities and individuals primarily in Manitoba and Ontario, with a smaller number from Minnesota and Wisconsin. Subject matter includes the photographs and ethnography of A. Irving Hallowell in these communities in the 1930s, thunderbirds, memegwesiwag, Ojibwe language, religion, ceremonies, and other traditions. The main communities concerned are Berens River, Pauingassi, Little Grand Rapids, Pikangikum, Poplar Hill, and Jackhead. The majority of the audio materials are interviews recorded in the context of producing radio documentaries for CBC Radio One from the early 1990s through late 2000s. (See Series I, Subseries 12 for the broadcast version of these documentaries.) Transcripts for both the finished documentaries and some of the interviews are located in Series II. Photographs taken during Matthews' visits to indigenous communities, museums, and other locations can be found in Series III.
Collection: Maureen Matthews Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.164)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Odawa
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Chippewa, Odawa
Language(s): English | Chippewa
Date: Undated
Type:Text
Extent: 3 items
Description: Materials relating to Radin's study of Ojibwe culture and history. Includes a discussion of the origin and spread of the medicine dance; notes from informants and excerpted from published sources: clan names and religion, ceremonial organization, magical rites, magic and witchcraft, war customs, migration tale of the Mississauga, naming and names, lists of personal names with 4 pages, outline of monograph; two outlines for works on Odawa culture and a comparative and contrastive discussion of "The Two Boys" and "Twin Myth"; text of an interview with Jim Pontiac including the description of thirty-two Ojibwe villages of the Upper Peninsula in English or French and Ojibwe; etc.
Collection: Paul Radin papers (Mss.497.3.R114)

Ojibwe
Date: 1948, 1967-1968, 1985, 1993-1997, 2012-2015
Extent: 1883 pages, 72 photographs, 1 film
Description: The Ojibwe materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of several items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Beckett, Gills, Hele, Jackson, Kurath, Morse, Pollak, Powers, White, Willets, and Wishart.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Kickapoo | Meskwaki | Ojibwe | Shawnee
Date: 1951-1952
Contributor: Littlecreek, Mr.
Subject: Linguistics
Extent: 1 sound tape reel (45 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Administered tests; Ojibwe text and phrase-by-phrase translation; Shawnee tests, text, and phrase-by-phrase translation. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Recordings for study of the Shawnee, Kickapoo, Ojibwa, and Sauk-and-Fox (Mss.Rec.14)