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Abenaki | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki
Date: 1884; 1959-1976; 1929
Type:Text
Extent: 1,300 pages; 1 microfilm reel
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Siebert Papers are located primarily in Series III and V. Ther are descriptions of wars with the Iroquois from the 17th century, linguistic materials, and stories. Series V includes 5 research notebooks containing historical notes and some linguistics materials.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1941-1946; 1951-1952
Extent: 1,652 pages, 920 slips, 59 phonograph discs, 4,500 cards
Description: The Cherokee materials in the ACLS collection consist of 3 sets of material located in the "Cherokee" section of the finding aid. The smallest item is Frans Olbrechts' brief essay comparing Cherokee and Ethiopic syllabaries. Two linguistic studies comprise the bulk of the remaining materials. Zellig Harris and John Witthoft's "Cherokee materials" was conducted in Philadelphia at the University of Pennsylvania and consists of grammatical Vocabularies and utterances, extensive grammatical notes and analyses, and numerous ethnographic and autobiographical stories, plus some songs, recorded on phonograph discs with Molly Sequoyah (mainly) and Will French. A small number of texts are written in the Cherokee syllabary as well. A second linguistic study by William Reyburn, conducted in Cherokee, N.C., consists of 1000+ pages of linguistic notes, transcriptions of recordings, and analyses, plus an extensive lexical file organized according to morpheme class. Reyburn's accompanying recordings are cataloged as Mss.Rec.16, "Cherokee materials gathered...on the Cherokee reservation at Cherokee, N.C.," listed separately in this guide.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1953, 1960-1961, 1972, 1976-1977, 1980-1981, 1984-1988, 1992-1999, 2012
Type:Text
Extent: 1123 pages
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 19 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Bender, Druke, Fogelson, Huff, Ishii, Jordan, Kilroe, Kosmider, Nichols, Phillips, Phillips, Pulte, Rachlin, Ruff, Scancarelli, Sheidley, Uchihara, and Witthoft. Some of these materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitvity or privacy considerations.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Language(s): English | Ho-Chunk
Date: 1938-1939
Type:Text
Extent: 281 pages, 11 notebooks
Description: The Ho-Chunk materials in the ACLS collection consists primarily of three items in the "Winnebago (Ho-Chunk)" section of the finding aid. The bulk of the material is Amelia Susman's 11 field notebooks, which contains texts with interlinear translation, Vocabularies, ethnographical and linguistic notes, and some songs. Two additional items also by Susman are extended analyses based upon field work with Sam Blowsnake and wife: "The accentual system of Winnebago" and "The Winnebago syllabary." In the "Chiwere (Iowa)" section of the finding aid, Gordon Marsh's "Materials for a study of the Iowa Indian language" include some Ho-Chunk grammatical notes, and Ho-Chunk cognates with Chiwere. Lastly, in the "Dakota" section, Franz Boas' "Miscellaneous Dakota notes" (item X8a.3) includes a Dakota-Ho-Chunk comparative word list.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Iowa
Alternate forms: Chiwere, Ioway, Oto, Otoe
Language(s): English | Iowa-Oto
Date: 1965, 1976, 1978, 1982-1983
Type:Text
Extent: 382 pages
Description: The Chiwere materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 5 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Good Tracks, Merrill, Smith, Vantine.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi | Ndau | Zulu | Heiltsuk
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Date: 1893-1951
Extent: Approx. 10,000 loose pages, 10 notebooks, 7000+ cards, 10+ maps
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the ACLS collection are located predominantly in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all materials (other relevant sections are "Northwest Coast", "Bella Bella (Heitsuk)", and item AfBnd.4 in "Non-American and non-linguistic material"). Some of the larger individual sets of materials listed within this section also have their own specific tables of contents (available upon request) detailing their often highly diverse contents. Overall, the vast majority of the material is made of of 1) manuscripts sent to Boas by George Hunt from the 1890s to the 1930s, frequently in both Kwak'wala and English, covering a very broad range of Kwakwaka'wakw history, culture, languages, customs, and traditions; and 2) field work materials recorded by Boas and Boas' own analyses of material sent by Hunt, covering a similar range of topics. Additional materials by other individuals focus especially on linguistic and ethnographic matters. Also see the "Kwakiutl materials, Franz Boas Papers," for information on the correspondence between Boas and Hunt, which gives additional context to the materials in the ACLS collection.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Maliseet | Penobscot | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Malecite
Date: 1933
Type:Text
Extent: 50 pages
Description: The Maliseet materials in the ACLS collection consist of a single item in the "Malecite" section of the finding aid. Sapir and Swadesh's "Notes on Penobscot and Malecite" primarily consists of Penobscot, with additional Maliseet vocabulary. It contains a Penobscot alphabet, text, and carbon copy of texts from records with interlinear translations, and lexical items on slips. Recorded in part with speaker Mitchell Attean.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Maya | Mixe | Zuni | Tzeltal
Date: 1963-1995
Description: The Maya materials in the Lounsbury Papers are extensive. The correspondence in Series I includes a Motul (Mayan) dictionary, discussion about translating Maya glyphs and calendrical calculations, the Popol Vuh. Series II consists of articles and manuscripts from a project identified as "Maya kinship unfin. project." Much of this work is focused on interpreting Maya hieroglyphs. In Series VII there are a number of recordings of Yucatec Maya made in the 1960s focused on vocabulary. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a dictionary by Rene Acuna, Lloyd Anderson's Etymologies of Mayan calendrical and astronomical terms, Anthony Aveni's interpretation of Maya hieroglyphs, Brent Berlin's decipherment of Maya hieroglyphs, Gordon Brotherston's comments on FGL's manuscript on Maya dates, Lyle Campbell's bibliography of Mayan linguistics, Wallace Chafe on how FGL got into the study of Maya hieroglyphics, Michael Coe's report that Soviets were successful in using a computer to translate Maya hieroglyphs, R. David Drucker's comparison of Aztec and Maya calendars, Dieter Dutting on Maya hieroglyphs; transformational analysis of Yucatec.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Menominee
Language(s): English | Menominee
Date: circa 1930s-1960s
Type:Text
Extent: 10 folders, 3 boxes
Description: The C. F. Voegelin Papers contain vocabulary, grammatical notes, short texts, and other linguistic and ethnographic materials relating to Menominee language and culture. These are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II of the Voegelin Papers. Materials in Subcollection I include corespondence with Leonard Bloomfield (regarding inscription on a silver bracelet obtained from Menominees and Bloomfield's "Menomini Grammar") in Series I. Correspondence; and 3 boxes of Menominee vocabulary and 2 folders of document files (mostly regarding kinship terminology) in Series II. Card Files. Materials in Subcollection II include a folder of Menominee notes (possibly given to Voegelin by Leonard Bloomfield) in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian. There are also Menominee examples in at least 6 folders ("Č and K," "L and M," "N and P," " Š and T," "Θ and ?" and "Specimens of Central Algonquian") of the many Comparative Algonquian notebooks in the same subseries (i.e., Macro-Algonquian).
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Nahua
Alternate forms: Aztec
Date: 1912-1924, 1928, 1930, 1940, 1949-1950, 1953
Type:Text
Extent: 359 pages, Circa 750 slips, 1 notebook (314 pages), 1 volume (168 pages)
Description: The Nahua materials in the ACLS collection consist of numerous items in the "Nahuatl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing. Prominent materials include texts recorded by Boas from Milpa Alta speakers, including Doña Luz Jiménez, in 1912. There are also additional texts, recorded by Miguel Barrios Espinosa in 1950 San Juan Tlilhuacan, Delegacion de Azcapotzales, Mexico City. Boas and Mason's "Nahautl vocabulary" contains 750+ word slips based upon work by Simeón and Mason. "Vocabulares Nawatl" by Leon and Swadesh consists of vocabulary of 3 Nahuatl dialects (identified as Telina, Ilamalan, and San Pedro [Atocpan?]) based on field work in 1939 with 4 speakers. There are additional grammatical studies and linguistic treatments by Whorf, Barlow, Croft, and Ripley. Some Nahuatl vocabulary can also be found in comparative Uto-Aztecan materials in the "Uto-Aztecan" section of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)