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Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Montagnais
Date: 1914-1947 and undated
Extent: 5 items
Description: Materials relating to Abenaki language and culture. Includes notes on a St. Francis Abenaki [Western Abenaki] conjuring lodge; miscellaneous notes about the St. Francis Abenaki including two cards of reading notes, a typed copy of an Indian poem in English from John Reade (1887), a letter from Frederick S. Dickson regarding Abenaki vocabulary, a letter from Edwin Tappan Adney concerning place names and Maine Indian shamans, and a photomechanical print of Montagnais [aka Innu] in camp; Wawenock [or Wawanoc, Eastern Abenaki] texts taken from Neptune, with interlinear translations [See also Speck (1928b).]; miscellaneous Wawenock notes on vocabulary, folklore, and population, along with a letter from J. P. Ranger about canoes, and three letters from W. C. Kendall, owner of Camp Wawenock, Lake Sebago, Maine, with information about Wawenock and his memories of Wawenock and Penobscot Indians of Maine; and a letter from Gordon M. Day seeking a bibliography and Speck's help in learning Abenaki.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Acoma
Language(s): English | Keres, Western
Date: 1915-1917, 1932-1941
Extent: 2 notebooks, 1 photograph, 1500 loose pages,
Description: The Acoma materials in the Elsie Clews Parsons papers consist of 1 photograph in item No. 26 of Subcollection I, Series II, "Notes, manuscripts, etc." and "No. 64. Acoma material"; and in Subcollection II, Series IV, "Research Notes" there are 2 Acoma field notebooks. Some of this material may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity or privacy concerns. Additional relevant material may appear in correspondence folders.
Collection: Elsie Clews Parsons papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.29)

Innu | Naskapi | Atikamekw | Wabanaki | Lenape | Algonquin | Mashpee | Passamaquoddy | Wampanoag | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot | Maliseet | Muscogee | Menominee
Alternate forms: Menomini, Têtes-de-Boules, Têtes de Boules, Tete de Boule
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1920-1940
Description: The materials from Algonquian speaking cultures is quite extensive, though scattered, in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers. One of the strengths is Hallowell's very fine black and white portraits of indigenous peoples located in Series VI, Subseries F, which includes images of Mashpee, Mohegan, Montagnais, Naskapi, Womponowag, Nipissing, Atikamekw, Series V contains some generalized materials such "Algoquian Cross Cousin Marriage," Speck's studies of northern Algoquian hunting territories, and Algonquin mythology and history. The folders entitled "Eastern Woodlands" in box 26 contain more culturally specific materials such as a Penobscot vocabulary list, Innu and Naswkapi material culture, and Delaware religions and ceremonies, although many of these are quite brief. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a letter from John Swanton discussing bear ceremonialism in Muscogee culture. George Herzog's correspondence includes Penobscot and Maliseet scores of war dance songs. There is also a letter from Jeffrey Zelitch, dated 1969, describing traditional ceremonies on the Lakota Rosebud reservation just before the American Indian Movement begins. George Spindler's lettter to describes a Medicine Lodge ceremony among the Menomini.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Aztec
Language(s): English | Spanish
Date: 1925
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Aztec materials include Folder "A:9772. Mexico" (1925), located in Series I. Trait Files, Box #65, which contains "Mexican Folkways," a booklet of brief essays such as "The Magic of Love Among the Aztecs" and "Coatlicue, An Aztec Goddess." Edited by Frances Toor with short offerings from Mario Gamio and several others. It was intended for the education of North American students of Spanish, and each essay appears in both English and Spanish on the advice of Franz Boas and others.
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Cherokee
Language(s): Cherokee | English
Date: 1958
Genre: Stories
Extent: 3 sound tape reels (2 hr. 2 min.)
Description: Field recordings made in North Carolina in 1958 of Cherokee sacred formulae dealing. The entirety of this recording collection has been designated as culturally sensitive and restricted.
Collection: Cherokee formulae (Mss.Rec.36)

Cheyenne
Language(s): Cheyenne | English
Date: 1949, 1963-1964, 1976, 1985-1987, 1991-1994, 2005, 2009
Extent: 1325 pages, 64 photographs
Description: The Cheyenne materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 7 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Berndt, Guerrier, Leman, Meadows, Merrill, Olson, Powers.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Cochiti
Alternate forms: Kotyit
Date: 1919-1940, 1957
Type:Text
Extent: 552 pages, 6 notebooks
Description: The Cochiti materials in the ACLS collection consist of several items in multiple sections of the finding aid. In the "Cochiti" section of the finding aid, there is a set of 5 field notebooks recorded by Boas in 1921-1922 containing his original field notes, texts, Vocabularies, paradigms, and notes in German shorthand. A second set of loose-leaf notes consists of texts with interlinear translations derived from the notebooks, 20 of which were later rendered into free translations by Ruth Benedict and published in 1931. In the "Keresan" section, Boas' "Keresan word list and linguistic notes" contains 8 folders of Laguna and Cochiti grammatical, linguistic, folkloristic, and ethnographic materials. His "Keresan lexical file" contains 8,000 Keresan terms, with some references to manuscripts from which they were derived, many of which are likely Cochiti. (This file may contain Western Keres as well.) In the "Laguna" section of the finding aid, Boas' "Laguna Vocabularies and texts" includes Keresan, Laguna, and Cochiti Vocabularies, grammatical notes, and texts. Lastly, in the "Tewa" section, "Cochiti and San Juan Pueblo songs" contains words, music, paraphrase of text, lists of ceremonial terms, and a "Phonologic chart for Cochiti Keresan and Tewa-Tanoan." NOTE: Portions of this material may be restricted due to potential cultural sensitivity.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Cochiti
Alternate forms: Kotyit
Language(s): English
Date: Undated
Extent: 5 pages, 1 set of potsherds
Description: The Cochiti materials in the Elsie Clews Parsons papers consist of a draft manuscript of a "Cochiti emergence myth," found in Subcollection I, Series II, "Notes, manuscripts, etc." under item 61, which contains draft versions from her "Pueblo Indian Religion" book. In this same Series, item No. 38 includes potsherds of a canteen pot from Cochiti. Additional relevant material may appear in correspondence folders. NOTE: Portions of this material may be restricted due to potential cultural sensitivity.
Collection: Elsie Clews Parsons papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.29)

Haudenosaunee | Mohawk
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Six Nations
Language(s): English | Mohawk
Date: 1885
Contributor: Newhouse, Seth
Type:Text
Genre: Stories
Extent: 1 volume, 302 pages
Description: Copy of original, formerly in possession of Ray Fadden, St. Regis Mohawk Reservation, Hogansburg, New York, now in possession of Mohawk tribe. Includes story of Dekanawidah, lists of chiefs, ceremonial chants (including Condolence Council), constitution and its acceptance (pages 1-200), version of same in Mohawk with interlinear translation, names of principal families, and incomplete "aboriginal dictionary." Marginal notes by William N. Fenton. Fully described in Fenton (1949).
Collection: Cosmology of De-ka-na-wi-da's government of the Iroquois confederacy, 1885 (Mss.970.3.Ir6)

Abenaki | Cherokee | Lenape | Mohawk | Munsee | Onondaga | Penobscot
Alternate forms: Lenape, Lenni-Lenape
Language(s): English | Delaware | Cree | Munsee | Cherokee | Onondaga
Date: 1930-1941; 1981-1983
Description: The Delaware materials in the Siebert collection can be found in Series IV, V, VII. Most of the materials are from secondary sources. Of interest is geographic diversity of Delaware materials ranging from Oklahoma to the Six Nations' reserve in Ontario to Moraviantown. There are also a number of Munsee recordings in Series XII.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)