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Aymara | Quechua
Language(s): English | Aymara | Spanish
Date: 1950-1972
Description: The Aymara materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist of comparative linguistics and studies of kinship in Series II. Of particular interest are the audio recordings in Series VII on the folklore of the Ayar Incas. The correspondence, in Series I, contains information of the geographic distribution of the language, Lounsbury's analysis of the language and its relationship to Quechua, Christian scriptures in Aymara, Morris Swadesh's work on genetic classification of Native American languages, and geographic distribution of Aymara population.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1828-1905; 1939-1975
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Lounsbury Papers is found primarily in several sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with a number of people on Cherokee language and culture. These correspondents include Harry Basehart, William Cook, William Fenton, John D. Gillespie, Mary Haas, Jack Kilpatrick, John Witthoft. In Series II, see the "Cherokee" section, which contains 3 boxes of research materials, including Lounsbury's field notes with numerous Cherokee speakers in Oklahoma, copies of original notes by other linguists, language instruction materials, and other related documents. The "General Iroquois" section contains some comparative materials as well, as may other sections to smaller degrees. Series VI contains multiple boxes of card files with Cherokee language data in the form of lexicons and texts in translation. In Series VII, there are several audio recordings, including a reading of Private John G. Burnett's eyewitness account of Cherokee removal, 1838-1839, and a significant number of recordings of songs and dances made by Will West Long and Della Owl, and Cherokee lessons by Robert Bushyhead and William Cook.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cocopah
Alternate forms: Cocopa
Language(s): Cocopa | English
Date: 1963, 1965, 1967
Extent: 10 sound tape reels (18 hr., 17 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: The Cocopah material in James Crawford's "Recordings of Native American languages" collection consist of 10 tapes of recordings in "Series 7: Cocopa." These recordings were made with several different speakers and include numerous traditional stories, songs, and elicitations of sentences and vocabularies. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: James Crawford Recordings of Native American languages (Mss.Rec.184)

Abenaki | Cherokee | Lenape | Mohawk | Munsee | Onondaga | Penobscot
Alternate forms: Lenape, Lenni-Lenape
Language(s): English | Delaware | Cree | Munsee | Cherokee | Onondaga
Date: 1930-1941; 1981-1983
Description: The Delaware materials in the Siebert collection can be found in Series IV, V, VII. Most of the materials are from secondary sources. Of interest is geographic diversity of Delaware materials ranging from Oklahoma to the Six Nations' reserve in Ontario to Moraviantown. There are also a number of Munsee recordings in Series XII.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Hopi | Huichol | Tarahumara | Tewa
Language(s): English | Hopi | Tewa
Date: 1964-1965
Extent: 14 sound tape reels (28 hr.)
Description: The recordings include names of plants, birds, reptiles, and other animals (including domesticated); costumes (including Kachina); Migration legend; place-names; kinship terms; numerals; weaving; pottery; Hopi, Huichol, and Tarahumara belts; medicine man; etc. Informants include: Frank Capella (Hopi and Tewa), Grace Chapella (Tewa), Ralph Charlie (Hopi?), George Cochase (Hopi and Tewa), Jim Kewanwytewa (Hopi), Donald Mahkewa (Tewa), Nettie Masayumptewa (Hopi?), Edmund Nequatewa (Hopi), Garnet Pavatea (Hopi?), Frank Sehma (Hopi), Henry Sheldon (Hopi), Annette Silas (Hopi), Albert Sinquah (Hopi), Dennis Sinquah (Hopi and Tewa), David Tawameiniwa (Hopi?), Joe Tevenyouma (Hopi?), Barton Wright (Hopi?), and Margaret Wright (Hopi?). Some materials in this collection may be designated as culturally sensitive and not reproducible.
Collection: Hopi and Tewa recordings (Mss.Rec.104)

Muscogee
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English | Muscogee
Date: 1930s-1970s
Extent: 7 linear feet
Description: The Muscogee (Creek) materials in the Mary R. Haas Papers are extensive, with materials found in most sections of the collection. In Series I, see especially the correspondence with professional colleagues such as Franz Boas, Jack Martin, William Sturtevant, and others regarding the Muscogee language, as well as correspondence with her Muscogee-speaking consultants, such as James Hill and Watt Sam. Other relevant letters in Series 1 include a "Creek language" subject heading listed with the item. The most extensive amount of material can be found in the "Creek" section of Series 2. This section contains 10 boxes of material. Prominent materials in this section include Haas's original 22 field notebooks, containing vocabulary elicitation, stories, and accompanying notes, recorded in 1941 in Eufaula, Oklahoma, Nonnie Scott, Arthur E. Raiford, James Hill, Jim Marshall, Jim Bullet, Don Starr, Peter Ewing, John Toney, Tom Tiger, Wesley Tauyan, Ollie Tauyan, John Thompson, Tom Red, Johnson Late, and Dan Cooke, plus others only identified with initials; 6 notebooks by James Hill, writing in the Mvskoke writing system, containing stories; Victor Riste's 4 field notebooks from 1931, containing stories and elicited vocabulary with multiple consultants listed; various linguistic notes and other materials derived from the above-listed notebooks; pedagogical materials for Muscogee language learning; a range materials on Muscogee (Creek) history; and more. Series 3 contains a small number of items labelled "Creek." In Series 9, there is additional extensive files linguistic material in the form of lexicons and grammatical notes, as well as ethnographic notes. Some Creek terms are also included in files comparing it with other languages. Lastly, in Series 10, there is a brief "Creek Texts" audio recording from the 1970s, as well as "Creek Text and Conversation" with Watt Sam and Nancy Raven in 1931.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Onondaga
Language(s): English | Onondaga
Date: 1950
Genre: Stories
Extent: 22 sound reel tapes (13 hr., 24 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Recorded in 1950 with consultants Lucenda George and Pat Johnson. Contains numerous autobiographical stories, descriptions of contemporary life on the Onondaga Reservation, and descriptions of tribal customs, foods, history, and governmental. There are 54 texts altogether given in Onondaga only--13 told by Pat Johnson, 41 by Lucenda George. Of these texts, 35 are translated into English by Lucenda George as the earlier recordings are played back to her in short segments. There are no transcripts or other documentation accompanying these recordings. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Onondaga material (Mss.Rec.3)

Abenaki | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1669; 1678; 1725-1796; 1809-1884; 1900-1995
Extent: 12 linear feet; 3 hrs. (audio)
Description: The Penobscot materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are concentrated in Series III. Siebert collected census material, treaties and treaty minutes, placenames, with a strong representation of songs, stories, and linguistic materials. There are detailed notes about Indian claims in Maine and genealogical information. There are also educational materials for the teaching of the Penobscot language as well as a wealth of information on Penobscot linguistics. Series V, Siebert's notebooks, have extensive grammatical, phonetic, and vocabulary of the Penobscot language. Both Series III and V reflect Siebert's deep interest in the history of Maine and the Eastern Abenaki including archaeological, pre-history, and colonial era documents such as the Eliot Bible, which Siebert owned a rare copy in his library, which was sold at auction. Series VI and VII contain various drafts of essays on Penobscot culture, language, and history. Series XII contains approximately 3 hours of Penobscot language recordings, primarily from the 1930s and 1950s.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Akimel O'odham | Tohono O'odham
Alternate forms: Papago, Pima
Language(s): English | Tohono O'odham
Date: 1961
Extent: 6 sound tape reels (8 hr., 50 min.) : DIGITIZED
Description: Linguistic field recordings made by Kenneth Hale with Luke Preston, Laurence Antone, and Isaac Antone in Arizona at Chichiu, Sacaton, and San Xavier Indian Reservation. Contents include several stories and brief "textlets" on various topics, including discussions of games and meaning of different words. Also includes elicitations of a variety of utterances, sentence permutations, and Vocabularies on body parts, kinship terms, and other general lists. (NOTE: This material has been digitized and can be accessed online for free by users not physically at the APS Library through a login and password. Please see our Audio Access Page for information on how to request these materials.)
Collection: Pima-Papago recordings (Mss.Rec.39)

Seneca
Language(s): English | Seneca
Date: 1911, 1946, 1947, 1950
Extent: 290 pages; 5 phonograph discs; 1 notebook
Description: The Seneca materials in the ACLS collection consist primarily of materials found in the "Seneca" section of the finding aid. This section includes Seneca vocabulary and grammatical notes recorded by Marius Barbeau at Grand River, as well as texts, audio recordings, and grammatical notes recorded by Zellig Harris. In the "Algonkian" section, Sapir's "Iroquois, Algonquian and Siouan field notes" includes brief vocabulary and texts in Seneca from Grand River in 1911. In the "Iroquois" section, some information on Seneca speakers and language are found in Hickerson's "Material on Iroquois dialects," a study of Iroquoian languages.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)