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Aymara | Quechua
Language(s): English | Aymara | Spanish
Date: 1950-1972
Description: The Aymara materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist of comparative linguistics and studies of kinship in Series II. Of particular interest are the audio recordings in Series VII on the folklore of the Ayar Incas. The correspondence, in Series I, contains information of the geographic distribution of the language, Lounsbury's analysis of the language and its relationship to Quechua, Christian scriptures in Aymara, Morris Swadesh's work on genetic classification of Native American languages, and geographic distribution of Aymara population.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Bororo
Date: 1950
Description: The Bororo materials in the Lounsbury Papers include linguistic materials in Series II. There are a significant number of audio recordings of narratives and chanting in Series VII. The correspondence, in Series I, includes Zarko Levak's work on the Bororo, Carl Schuster's photographs of Bororo jaguar skin robes.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1828-1905; 1939-1975
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Lounsbury Papers is found primarily in several sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with a number of people on Cherokee language and culture. These correspondents include Harry Basehart, William Cook, William Fenton, John D. Gillespie, Mary Haas, Jack Kilpatrick, John Witthoft. In Series II, see the "Cherokee" section, which contains 3 boxes of research materials, including Lounsbury's field notes with numerous Cherokee speakers in Oklahoma, copies of original notes by other linguists, language instruction materials, and other related documents. The "General Iroquois" section contains some comparative materials as well, as may other sections to smaller degrees. Series VI contains multiple boxes of card files with Cherokee language data in the form of lexicons and texts in translation. In Series VII, there are several audio recordings, including a reading of Private John G. Burnett's eyewitness account of Cherokee removal, 1838-1839, and a significant number of recordings of songs and dances made by Will West Long and Della Owl, and Cherokee lessons by Robert Bushyhead and William Cook.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Abenaki | Cherokee | Lenape | Mohawk | Munsee | Onondaga | Penobscot
Alternate forms: Lenape, Lenni-Lenape
Language(s): English | Delaware | Cree | Munsee | Cherokee | Onondaga
Date: 1930-1941; 1981-1983
Description: The Delaware materials in the Siebert collection can be found in Series IV, V, VII. Most of the materials are from secondary sources. Of interest is geographic diversity of Delaware materials ranging from Oklahoma to the Six Nations' reserve in Ontario to Moraviantown. There are also a number of Munsee recordings in Series XII.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Denesuline | Mattole | Hupa
Alternate forms: Chipewyan, Dënesųłiné, Na:tini-xwe
Date: 1928-1982
Extent: 1.5 linear feet
Description: The heart of the Fanggui Li Collection is comprised of ten notebooks kept by the Chinese-American linguist Fanggui (Fang-Kuei) Li relating to his research on the Chipewyan [Dene] language in 1928. Recorded in the field, these texts consist of phonetic transcriptions of stories elicited from François Mandeville in Chipewyan (Denesuline); (and, in one instance, Baptiste Ferrier) in July 1928, with interlinear English translations. The topics of these stories include myths, folklore, and tribal history as well as activities like fishing, tanning a moose hide, or making a canoe. The balance of the collection consists of an extensive slipfile for the Chipewyan [Dene] language, and two audio cassettes of oral history interviews conducted by Laurence C. Thompson and M. Terry Thompson in 1982, concerning Li's memories of Edward Sapir and other colleagues in linguistics. Interview topics include Li's early education, experience at the University of Chicago, Leonard Bloomfield, Edward Sapir's influence on his course of study, Li's fieldwork on the Mattole language in Northern California in the late 1920s, discrimination against Chinese in that region at that time, Li's work with Sapir on the Hupa reservation, and various aspects of linguistic methodology of the times, including recording with wax cylinders. See the finding aid for more information, including more details on the contents of each notebook and the two audio cassettes, and for related material.
Collection: Fanggui Li Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.119)

Guarani | Quechua | Aymara | Maya
Date: 1936-1950
Description: The Guarani materials in the Lounsbury Papers can be found in multiple sections of the collection. In Series I, there is correspondence from Rahder, Rubin, and Tulchin. In Series II, in the "Other Languages and Cultures of the Americas" section, there are Lounsbury's notes, "Têtagüá Sapucài (Grito del Pueblo)," which accompany sound recordings. In the "South America" section of Series II, see Fieldnotes #5, under "Brazil," and "Terena and Guarani Wire Recordings Tables of Contents." In Series VII, there are two sets of digitized recordings, "Paraguayan Popular Music" and "Terena-Guarani." Of special interest among the audio is the "Story of the Guarani creator, Tupi, and the creation of the Guarani people" told by Pedro Coelho de Suza.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Guna
Alternate forms: Cuna, Kuna
Language(s): English | Kuna, San Blas | Spanish
Date: 1959
Genre: Stories
Description: The Guna materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist of four recordings interspersed wtih explanations in Spanish. The original recordings were made by Reina Torres de Iannello.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Haudenosaunee | Catawba | Bororo | Hopi | Mohawk | Shawnee | Cayuga | Cherokee
Date: 1862; 1913-1996
Description: The Haudenosaunee materials in the Lounsbury Papers are vast in scope ranging from ceremonial recordings in Series VII to secondary sources in Series II to Lounsbury's own linguistic work among the Six Nations (see notes on Mohawk, Cayuga, Seneca, Oneida, and Onondaga materials.). The correspondence, in Series I, includes notes by Marius Barbeau on six Iroquoian dialects, a recording of the Condolence Ceremony recited by George Thomas, Gordon Day's work on Iroquois place names in Vermont, William Fenton's work on Iroquois-Cherokee linguistic relations, a manuscript of Mary Haas' comments on FGL's "Iroquois-Cherokee Linguistic Relations," George Harnell's work on Iroquois culture, Gunther Michelson's work on Iroquois place names, James Pendergast's study of longhouse construction and LaSalle's 1669-1670, Morris Swadesh's notes on the Caughnawaga Iroquois in Brooklyn, NY, Elisabeth Tooker on Iroquois cosmology, a manuscript of Iroquois grammar by Carl Voeglin, William Wykoff's study of Iroquois prehistory.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Karuk
Alternate forms: Karok
Language(s): Karuk | English | Spanish
Date: 1949-2006
Extent: 4 linear feet
Description: From the age of 21 throughout his life, William Bright worked with Karuk speakers to document and revitalize their language, resulting in becoming the first white honorary member of the Karuk tribe. The most prominent materials at the American Philosophical Society as a result are wide-ranging audio recordings, from the 1950s until the 2000s (Series 6), especially with Violet Super. With Susan Gehr, he produced a Karuk language dictionary, correspondence with whom (Series 1) contains draft texts. With the Karuk he contributed considerably to the literature on Coyote in particular, original transcriptions of which are in notebooks in Series 3 Subseries 1, and further developments in Series 2. He also collected many small publications about Karuk, in the same series. Additionally of interest in Series 1 is correspondence about the suspected arson of a'tim'îin, the Karuk sacred site near Somes Bar, CA. Karuk materials can be found in every series.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Hupacasath | Nuu-chah-nulth | Tseshaht
Alternate forms: Nootka
Language(s): English | Nuu-chah-nulth
Date: 1960-1990
Extent: 10.5 linear feet; 34 hours
Description: The Susan Golla Papers include research notes, subject files, field notes, copies of archival documents (photocopies; microfilm), audio recordings, 35 mm slides, and printed materials. The entirety of the collection concerns the Nuu-chah-nulth people of Vancouver Island, primarily the Hupacasath and Tseshaht of the Port Alberni region where Golla conducted her fieldwork in the 1970s. Series 1 contains correspondence. Series 2 contains 28 field notebooks from 1967, 1976-1979, and 1990-1991. This series also contains notes relating to work with the Tseshaht elder Mabel Taylor on translation of "The Legendary of Tseshaht," an untranslated story from Edward Sapir's field notebooks, originally told by Tom Sayachapis and recorded by Edward Sapir in November 1910. Series 5 includes an incomplete set of Ha-Shilth-Sa, the newspaper of record for the Nuu-chah-nulth communities of Vancouver Island, from 1976-1989. Series 6 includes 334 color slides of Hupacasath and Tseshaht ceremonies, 1976-1979. Includes images of singing, dancing, and bartering of wealth with gifts of food and goods at weddings and other community events. Prints also display regalia, traditional musical instruments, and the carving and raising of a pole. Series 7 includes interviews with Tseshaht elders Mabel Taylor, Margaret Shewish, Hughie Watts, on Nuu-chah-nulth language, food prepration, and Sayachapis. Additional tapes are of sessions working with Mabel Taylor on the translation of "The Legendary History of the Tseshaht." NOTE: Some portions of the field notes may be restricted due to privacy concerns surrounding personal information.
Collection: Susan Golla papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.89)