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Aymara | Quechua
Language(s): English | Aymara | Spanish
Date: 1950-1972
Description: The Aymara materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist of comparative linguistics and studies of kinship in Series II. Of particular interest are the audio recordings in Series VII on the folklore of the Ayar Incas. The correspondence, in Series I, contains information of the geographic distribution of the language, Lounsbury's analysis of the language and its relationship to Quechua, Christian scriptures in Aymara, Morris Swadesh's work on genetic classification of Native American languages, and geographic distribution of Aymara population.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Language(s): English | Spanish
Date: 1590-1976
Type:Text
Extent: 26 reels
Description: This collection includes field notes and reports, diaries of expeditions, texts, grammars, dictionaries of Indian languages, theses and research papers collected by members of the Department of Anthropology of the University of Chicago in connection with the Carnegie Institution of Washington Middle American Research Program as well as various Central American governmental agencies. A microfilm publication of the University of Chicago, 1946-1957. Table of contents. Originals at theUniversity of Chicago.
Collection: Manuscripts on Middle American Cultural Anthropology, 1590-1976 (Mss.Film.297)

Guna
Alternate forms: Cuna, Kuna
Language(s): English | Kuna, San Blas | Spanish
Date: 1959
Genre: Stories
Description: The Guna materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist of four recordings interspersed wtih explanations in Spanish. The original recordings were made by Reina Torres de Iannello.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Karuk
Alternate forms: Karok
Language(s): Karuk | English | Spanish
Date: 1949-2006
Extent: 4 linear feet
Description: From the age of 21 throughout his life, William Bright worked with Karuk speakers to document and revitalize their language, resulting in becoming the first white honorary member of the Karuk tribe. The most prominent materials at the American Philosophical Society as a result are wide-ranging audio recordings, from the 1950s until the 2000s (Series 6), especially with Violet Super. With Susan Gehr, he produced a Karuk language dictionary, correspondence with whom (Series 1) contains draft texts. With the Karuk he contributed considerably to the literature on Coyote in particular, original transcriptions of which are in notebooks in Series 3 Subseries 1, and further developments in Series 2. He also collected many small publications about Karuk, in the same series. Additionally of interest in Series 1 is correspondence about the suspected arson of a'tim'îin, the Karuk sacred site near Somes Bar, CA. Karuk materials can be found in every series.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Mixtec
Date: 1916; 1922; 1940
Type:Text
Extent: 41 pages, 300 cards
Description: The Mixtec materials in the ACLS collection consist mainly of three items in the "Mixtec" section of the finding aid. Radin's "Mixtec and Chinantec lexicon" is based on his own field work (found in the Paul Radin papers, listed separately in this guide) and other published work by Belmar. There is also an analysis of Mixtec tones and those of other neighboring language families by Jaime de Angulo, and a Spanish-Mixtec vocabulary assembled by McQuown and Swadesh. In the “Mexico” section of the finding aid, see “Comparative vocabularies of various Indian languages of Mexico,” which includes Mixtec vocabulary, and McQuown's “Phonemic systems of various Indian languages of Mexico,” which includes Mixtec information. In the “Zapotec” section of the finding aid, see de Angulo's “Estudio gramatical de las lenguas de la familia zapoteca,” which includes Mixtec information and ten ink sketches of maps showing linguistic groups, and de Angulo's “Zapotecan texts,” which includes Mixtec texts. Specific Mixtec languages identified above are based upon languages located in Radin's fieldwork.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Nahua
Alternate forms: Aztec
Date: 1912-1924, 1928, 1930, 1940, 1949-1950, 1953
Type:Text
Extent: 359 pages, Circa 750 slips, 1 notebook (314 pages), 1 volume (168 pages)
Description: The Nahua materials in the ACLS collection consist of numerous items in the "Nahuatl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing. Prominent materials include texts recorded by Boas from Milpa Alta speakers, including Doña Luz Jiménez, in 1912. There are also additional texts, recorded by Miguel Barrios Espinosa in 1950 San Juan Tlilhuacan, Delegacion de Azcapotzales, Mexico City. Boas and Mason's "Nahautl vocabulary" contains 750+ word slips based upon work by Simeón and Mason. "Vocabulares Nawatl" by Leon and Swadesh consists of vocabulary of 3 Nahuatl dialects (identified as Telina, Ilamalan, and San Pedro [Atocpan?]) based on field work in 1939 with 4 speakers. There are additional grammatical studies and linguistic treatments by Whorf, Barlow, Croft, and Ripley. Some Nahuatl vocabulary can also be found in comparative Uto-Aztecan materials in the "Uto-Aztecan" section of the finding aid.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Nahua
Date: ca.1940s-2003
Type:Text
Extent: 2 linear feet
Description: William Bright's Nahuatl materials are sizeable and cover his entire research life, mostly consisting of his own work from the 1960s and 1990s (Series 4), and many copies of small publications throughout his life (Series 2). Of note in the small publications is almost every issue of “Nahua Newsletter” (Indiana University) between 1986 and 2004, issues 1-18 of “Mexihkatl Itonalama”, and several 1940s-1960s SIL-archived publications. From his own work (Series 4) are interlinear glosses of Nahuatl texts, materials in preparation for taught courses at UCLA, products of brief fieldwork in Ixmiquilpan, Mexico, 1966, working versions of two of his own publications, and further linguistic analysis. He also corresponded with several linguists on Nahuatl varieties (Series 1), including Una Canger, who gave him a copy of the Copenhagen Nahuatl Dictionary Project.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Tepecano | Akimel O'odham | Huichol | Cora
Alternate forms: Pima
Language(s): English | Spanish | Tepecano
Date: 1911-1913 and undated
Extent: 7 items; photographs
Description: Materials relating to John Alden Mason's interest in and research on Tepecano language and culture. Items include 8 notebooks of field notes (1912-1913), containing a list of specimens purchased, texts, and notes on the language, ethnology, and archaeology, etc.; Mason's Preliminary Report as Fellow to the Escuela Internacional de Etnologia y Arqueologia Americanas (1912-1913), on continued investigations in linguistics, religion, ethnology, and mythology of the Tepecanos and in the archaeology of their region; Mason's Tepecano linguistic file, comprised of about 1000 cards with Tepecano words and sentences, with Spanish translations for most and English translations for some; Mason's "A Sketch of Tepecano Religion," which includes some comparison with religious beliefs of Huichols and Coras; a Tepecano Rain Festival Song, musical score with Tepecano lyrics; 6 pages of Tepecano verbal roots with English glosses; and Mason's miscellaneous notes on Tepecano regarding ethnology, linguistics, religion, Piman [Akimel O'odham] comparisons, etc., and including prayers with interlinear English translation (with note "work done for Boas").
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

O'dam | Tepecano | Tohono O'odham | Akimel O'odham
Alternate forms: Papago, Pima, Tepehuan
Date: 1916-1967
Extent: 21 items; photographs
Description: Materials relating to John Alden Mason's interest in and research on Tepehuan language and culture. Northern Tepehuan is most prominently represented in this collection, though references to "Southern Tepehuan" indicate the presence of data on what are now distinguished as the Southeastern Tepehuan and Southwestern Tepehuan languages. Items focused on Northern Tepehuan include Mason's report from the Northern Tepehuan Linguistic Expedition, Baborigame, Chihuahua, Mexico (1951); his Northern Tepehuan linguistics file, containing circa 350 cards with words, phrases, and sentences with Spanish glosses and occasionally some Tepecano and Papago [Tohono O'odham] cognates; two 1936 notebooks on Northern Tepehuan linguistics with vocabulary and texts with Spanish glosses based on work with consultant Pedro Valencia; two 1951 notebooks on Northern Tepehuan linguistics with grammatical notes and texts from wire recordings; 20 pages of Northern Tepehuan texts with interlinear Spanish translation; 20 pages of texts relating to myths, official speeches, settling marital difficulties, etc. with interlinear Spanish 14 pages on Northern Tepehuan morphology concerned primarily with suffixes, taken from the files of Burton W. Bascom; 5 pages of Northern Tepehuan miscellaneous notes including verb conjugation labeled "Bascom" and a map; and two copies of "The Sacred Case" in Northern Tepehuan with English translation, attributed to Juan Dolores. There is one item focused on Southern Tepehuan, comprised of seven notebooks of Southern Tepehuan field notes containing grammatical notes, texts, and some transcriptions and translations of recordings at the American Philosophical Society (see also #3738). More general or comparative materials include Mason's "The Primitive Religions of Mexico" (1916), a paper read at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (Tepecano prayers to accompany the paper lacking); Mason's "Notes on the Linguistic and Cultural Affiliations of the Tepehuan and Tepecano," written for the Mexican Historical Congress, Zacatecas (1948); Mason's "Tepehuan of Northern Mexico" (1958), regarding observations on the culture which were made incidental to linguistic fieldwork (includes original and two copies with maps); lists of perdones Tepehuanes and notes on same; comparative lists from Southern and Northern dialects of Tepehuan, with English glosses and comments, by Burton W. Bascom and based on his work in 1943-1944 under the auspices of the Summer Institute of Linguistics; 14 pages of kinship terms in Southern Tepehuan, Northern Tepehuan, and Tepecano with English glosses; and a notebook containing a digest of Rinaldini's Tepehuane taken from the book in the Ayer Collection, Newberry Library. Correspondence includes letters from Burton W. Bascom regarding Northern Tepehuan with some mention of Tepecano, Pima [Akimel O'odham], Papago [Tohono O'odham], and Southern Tepehuan, and including a short paper by Bascom on the Northern Tepehuan possessive -ga, a Northern Tepehuan verb list for comparison with Mason's Tepecano list, and a discussion of noun plural formation with examples; Brete R. Hart regarding receipt of material on Utaztecan, work on alphabet for Southern Tepehuan, and a brief description of Fiesta for the Dead observed at Xoconoxtle, Durango, Mexico; Phil C. Weigland regarding acculturation, history, and relations with whites in San Sebastian and Azqueltan; and a report and correspondence from John Hobgood concerning events transpiring during a visit by John Hobgood and Carroll L. Riley to Santa Maria Ocotlan: their presentation of letters, request for permission to study the Tepehuan language and customs of the village, and interactions with the villagers. Hobgood mentions Agnes McClain Howard as well as Carroll L. Riley.
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Nahua
Date: ca.1970-2002
Extent: 6 linear feet
Description: The majority of the Jane M. Rosenthal Papers centers on Nahuatl linguistic and anthropological research. Materials therefore appear extensively in every series. Rosenthal's own fieldwork on Tlaxcaltec (Acxotla del Monte, Tlaxcala, Mexico) spanned the 1970s and 1980s, involving the production of 17 field notebooks (Series 2 Subseries 1) with accompanying tapes (Series 10, available in the Digital Library), lexical slips (Series 7), photographs (Series 8) and much correspondence, in Spanish, with members of the Atonal and de Texis families (Series 1). Jane Hill also conducted research with many of the same consultants, works by whom (including interview transcriptions) can be found mostly in Series 5. Rosenthal also engaged with preexisting primary sources at archives in Mexico and the U.S., creating transcriptions and interlinearizations of texts (Series 2 Subseries 2), and produced several articles on Nahuatl grammar, Nahua culture and interactions with missions (Series 2 Subseries 3). Further to her own work, this collection contains much gathered material by others. In addition to that of Jane and Kenneth Hill, several drafts and publications by fellow University of Chicago student Kay A. Read on Nahua/Aztec religion appear in Series 5, and publications and commentary with other Uto-Aztecanists are scattered throughout Series 1 and 5. Rosenthal was heavily involved in the meetings of the Friends of Uto-Aztecan from its inception in 1973, many handouts from which (relating to a variety of Uto-Aztecan languages) can be found in Series 6. Her student notes, many produced by Norman McQuown (Series 3), and teaching notes (Series 4) may also be of interest.
Collection: Jane M. Rosenthal Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.129)