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Creek | Choctaw
Language(s): English
Date: 1798-1810
Type:Text
Extent: 285 pages
Description: Original in possession of Independence National Historical Park. Letter book kept by Hawkins at the Creek Agency relating to Indian affairs, including outgoing letters, memoranda, and speeches to and from the Creeks and Choctaws. Topics include an attempt to survey the St. Mary's River and Spanish-U.S. relations. Includes a "sketch" of the Indians at the Creek Agency discussing political organization, agriculture, manufacture, public establishments, and justice. Materials written variously at Fort Wilkinson, Tukabatchee, and Coweta.
Collection: Benjamin Hawkins letterbook, 1798-1810 (Mss.Film.680)

Cayuga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): Cayuga | English
Date: 1990-1991, 1993, 1997
Type:Text
Extent: 425 pages
Description: The Cayuga materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 4 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Foster and Thomas.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Dakota | Lakota
Alternate forms: Dakhota, Lakhota, Santee, Sioux, Teton, Yankton
Language(s): Dakota | English | Lakota
Date: 1838-1938 (bulk 1930s)
Type:Text
Extent: 7500+ pages, 3300+ slips; 2 notebooks
Description: The Dakota and Lakota materials in the ACLS collection consist of a very large and diverse set of materials, and are located in the "Dakota" section of the finding aid, which provides a detailed listing of all contents. The vast majority of these materials were composed and assembled by Ella Deloria during the 1930s, both recorded from contemporary speakers and from various historical manuscript sources, which were sent to Franz Boas. The bulk of Deloria's materials are stories and speeches in typewritten manuscript form, with a transcription in the original language, followed by a literal word-for-word translation, then a free translation in English, and a section of footnotes commenting upon the original text and translation decisions. Some of her manuscripts occasionally lack one or more of these sections. These texts cover a wide range of topics, from traditional narratives, historical accounts, autobiographical stories, descriptions of games, customs, ceremonies, etc., and speeches, often concerning political affairs and economic conditions from the late-19th century to the 1930s. Names of numerous speakers are also given in the manuscripts themselves. Some of these materials were published, but most were not. Note that Deloria identifies the language recorded by using the terms "Teton" for Lakota language, and "Santee" and "Yankton" to indicate Eastern and Western dialects of Dakota language. The collection also includes a much smaller amount of material by Boas and others, primarily consisting of linguistics notes and musical analysis. A full list of places where the material was recorded has not yet been assembled.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Language(s): English | Ho-Chunk
Date: 1908-1930 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 49 items
Description: Materials relating to Radin's study of Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) history, culture, and language. Some items are written in Ho-Chunk, with and without English translations. This large collection includes 34 original field notebooks; numerous short and long stories (Hare cycle, Aleck Linetree [probably Alec Lone Tree], the origin of the Buffalo clan, the story of the holy one, the boy who wished to be immortal, etc.); several longer pieces, such as a typed manuscript titled "The legend of Mother-of-all-the-Earth," speeches of Charlie Houghton, multiple versions of "How Blowsnake joined the medicine dance," "Origin myth of the medicine dance," etc.; several published secondary sources; over 3,000 slips for an English-Winnebago [i.e. Ho-Chunk] dictionary and other items relating to Ho-Chunk phonetics, lexicon, linguistics, etc.; several phonetic texts, some with English translation; and a variety of other items with ethnographic, historical, and linguistic data pertaining to ceremonies, tales, clans, medicine, origins, dance, burial, peyote, names, and sweat-baths. Individuals mentioned (some as ) include: Jacob Russell, Charlie Houghton, Oliver LaMere, Sam Blowsnake, John Rave, Thomas Clay, Robert Lincoln, James Smith, Tom Big Bear, and George Ricehill.
Collection: Paul Radin papers (Mss.497.3.R114)

A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Language(s): English | German | Kwak'wala
Date: 1893-1951
Extent: Approx. 10,000 loose pages, 10 notebooks, 7000+ cards, 10+ maps
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the ACLS collection are located predominantly in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all materials. Some of the larger individaul sets of materials listed within this section also have their own specific tables of contents (available upon request) detailing their often highly diverse contents. Overall, the vast majority of the material is made of of 1) manuscripts sent to Boas by George Hunt from the 1890s to the 1930s, frequently in both Kwak'wala and English, covering a very broad range of Kwakwaka'wakw history, culture, languages, customs, and traditions; and 2) field work materials recorded by Boas and Boas' own analyses of material sent by Hunt, covering a similar range of topics. Additional materials by other individuals focus especially on linguistic and ethnographic matters. Also see the "Kwakiutl materials, Franz Boas Papers," for information on the correspondence between Boas and Hunt, which gives additional context to the materials in the ACLS collection.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Gusgimukw | Gwawa'enuxw | Haida | Kwakwaka'wakw | Nak'waxda'xw | Nuu-chah-nulth
Alternate forms: Kwakiutl, Koskimo, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nootka, Quatsino
Language(s): English | Kwak'wala
Date: undated, and 1920-1942
Type:Text
Extent: 12+ folders; 4 notebooks
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the Franz Boas Professional Papers consist of numerous folders containing Kwakwaka'wakw stories (some by George Hunt), notes on songs (much of it by the Namgis chief, Dan Cranmer), ethnographic and historical information, and linguistic notes on the Kwak'wala language. See items listed under "Boas, Franz -- Kwakiutl," for some materials, including those by Dan Cranmer. Under "Hunt, George - Kwakiutl," there are notebooks and texts, including 6 texts in Boas's hand in Kwak'wala with English interlinear translation. These includes "Host Speech for great great feast," two texts on "Supernatural Experience" and marriage told by Mrs. George Hunt, and Hë'mănis told by Gi'galas (Gwawa'enuxw), with revised version written by George Hunt. Finally, see the folder labeled "Kwakiutl material (on names)," which contains lists of names of plants, birds, specific people, positions, coppers, and other matters, primarily provided by Dan Cranmer.
Collection: Franz Boas Personal and Professional Papers (Mss.B.B61p)

Haudenosaunee | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1845-1881
Type:Text
Extent: 2 reels
Description: Materials of ethnologist and anthropologist Lewis Henry Morgan. Reel 1: Lorimer Fison and Alfred W. Howitt to Morgan, 1865-1881, 455 pages. Materials pertaining to geology, etc., 194 pages. Materials pertaining to Morgan's secret society, Grand Council of the Iroquois, by Morgan, 156 pages, by others, 105 pages. Rules, Constitutions, etc., 44 pages. Volume 1 of Morgan manuscript journals, 394 pages. Reel 2: Volumes 2-6 of Morgan manuscript journals, 453, 532, 385, 456, and 552 pages. The journal includes notes on travels to New York and Michigan, conversations, and Indian councils. Record of Indian letters [i.e., Record of the inquiry concerning the Indian system of relationship...], volume 1, letters sent, 230 pages; volume 2, letters received, 279 pages. (Includes related correspondence). Printed table of contents (1936). [See also, for descriptive contents, Rochester Historical Society Publication Fund Series 2: 83-97; and White (1959).] Originals in the Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester.
Collection: Lewis Henry Morgan journal and correspondence, 1845-1876 (Mss.Film.582)

Onondaga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Onondaga
Date: 1891-1901, 1908, 1936-1949, 1951-1952, 1968-1971, 1986, 1992, 1995
Type:Text
Extent: .5 linear feet
Description: The Onondaga materials in the Fenton papers include multiple correspondents in Series I, such as Onondaga Nation, Howard Skye, and James Skye. In Series III, see ""Concerning the League: a motif analysis of the Gibson-Goldenweiser version of the Deganawidah Epic," "The Funeral of Tadodaho: Onondaga of Today," and "Sir William Johnson Carries the Ritual of Condolence over the Path to Onondaga, 1756." In Series IV, see articles by Bradley, Kurath, and Woodbury. Series VI includes "Onondaga Longhouse Food Spirit Festival." Series VIII-A, Series VIII-B, and Series VIII-F, include several folders of Onondaga-related materials. Some of these materials are restricted due to cultural sensitivity concerns.
Collection: William N. Fenton papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.20)

Seneca | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English | Seneca
Date: Bulk 1930s-1990s
Extent: 15+ linear feet
Description: Seneca materials make up the majority of the Fenton papers and can be found throughout all sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with numerous people on Seneca matters. Noteworthy Seneca correspondents include Simeon Gibson, Clara Redeye, Sherman Redeye, and other individuals such as those listed above. The largest body of material is in Series V, which includes Fenton's notebooks and other documentation from field work at Allegany, Cattaraugus, Tonawanda, and Grand River, beginning in the 1930s through late in his career. This section also includes extensive card files on "Materia Medica" or ethnobotanical information, and Seneca place names. Series VI consists of over 1000 photographs, the majority of which are from Seneca communities in the 1930s-1950s. Series VIII includes additional field notes and other materials derived mainly from his 1930s fieldwork. Significant portions of these materials may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity, as Fenton's materials frequently pertain to areas of sacred traditional knowledge.
Collection: William N. Fenton papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.20)