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Lenape | Haudenosaunee | Mohawk | Oneida | Seminole
Alternate forms: Lenape, Iroquois
Language(s): French
Date: circa 1837
Extent: 2 volumes
Description: These two bound volumes contain a published first edition, 1837, of Jean Baptiste Gaspard Roux de Rochelle's Etats-Unis D'Amerique (History of the United States of America), a Frenchman's take on American history and culture, and a companion volume of original sketches used for the 96 engraved plates. Many of the images--of American scenes and history--in the second volume appear to be based on the work of de Bry and other artists. Some are in color. There are 27 original drawings of Native Americans and 27 steel engravings of the same. They depict indigenous people, primarily from the, in native attire hunting, fishing, playing, mourning, warring, eating, cooking, and celebrating. Some illustrations accompanying the early text are based on Theodore De Bry's engravings of John White's watercolor drawings of Roanoke in 1585. The later historical text is accompanied by illustrations of Oneidas, Mohawks, and Delawares conferring or warring with Europeans. There are also sketches of petroglyphs, pottery, wampum, and headgear. Illustrators and engravers include Vernier, Branche, and Milbert. Some images have been digitized.
Collection: Etats-Unis d'amerique (Mss.917.3.R76)

Ahtna | Tlingit
Alternate forms: Atna, Ahtena
Language(s): English | Ahtna | Tlingit
Date: 1949-1960
Extent: 6 reels
Description: These field notes, compiled by de Laguna and Catherine McClellan, include archaeological investigations, transcripts of interviews with community members and sketches. Tlingit material recorded at Yakutat, Angoon, Carcross, and Teslin, with small amount at Atlin; Ahtna material recorded at Chitina, Copper Center, and Chistochina.
Collection: Field notes on the ethnology of the Tlingit and Copper River Atna (Mss.Film.1127)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Date: 1883-1884
Type:Text
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Inuit materials in the Franz Boas Professional Papers consist of approximately 11 folders, 3 diaries, 2 sketchbooks, and numerous maps and illustrations. Most of this material surrounds Boas' first fieldwork trip of his career to Baffin Island ("Baffinland") in 1883-1884. Under "Boas, Franz," most of this materials are labelled under "Arctic Expedition" or "Baffinland." These include Boas' diaries and sketchbooks, as well as typed translations of them. See also materials listed under "Weike, Wilhelm" for the diary of Boas' assistant during the expedition. The correspondence file for "Comer, George" contains additional information, as may other correspondence files.
Collection: Franz Boas Personal and Professional Papers (Mss.B.B61p)

Gusgimukw | Gwawa'enuxw | Haida | Kwakwaka'wakw | Nak'waxda'xw | Nuu-chah-nulth
Alternate forms: Kwakiutl, Koskimo, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nootka, Quatsino
Language(s): English | Kwak'wala
Date: undated, and 1920-1942
Type:Text
Extent: 12+ folders; 4 notebooks
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the Franz Boas Professional Papers consist of numerous folders containing Kwakwaka'wakw stories (some by George Hunt), notes on songs (much of it by the Namgis chief, Dan Cranmer), ethnographic and historical information, and linguistic notes on the Kwak'wala language. See items listed under "Boas, Franz -- Kwakiutl," for some materials, including those by Dan Cranmer. Under "Hunt, George - Kwakiutl," there are notebooks and texts, including 6 texts in Boas's hand in Kwak'wala with English interlinear translation. These includes "Host Speech for great great feast," two texts on "Supernatural Experience" and marriage told by Mrs. George Hunt, and Hë'mănis told by Gi'galas (Gwawa'enuxw), with revised version written by George Hunt. Finally, see the folder labeled "Kwakiutl material (on names)," which contains lists of names of plants, birds, specific people, positions, coppers, and other matters, primarily provided by Dan Cranmer.
Collection: Franz Boas Personal and Professional Papers (Mss.B.B61p)

Lenape | Nanticoke | Pawnee | Shawnee | Cayuga | Mohawk | Haudenosaunee | Abenaki | Munsee | Tutelo
Alternate forms: Delaware, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Delaware
Date: 1895-1948
Extent: 57 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Delaware history, language, and culture. Speck's correspondence with Delaware collaborators in Oklahoma relating to Delaware history, ethnographic data, linguistics, museum specimens, and reservation affairs, etc., might be of particular interest; there are also several tales related by Witapanóxwe, or War Eagle, other tales and texts (some with interlineal translation) from Josiah Montour and other unknown contributors, and 11 sketches of Delaware art designs. Other correspondence touches on Speck's efforts to collect specimens (and individuals and institutions interested in acquiring them), his efforts to collect paintings and sketches of ceremonies and designs, his fieldwork and expenses, financial support from the University of Pennsylvania and Indiana Historical Society, Shawnee data on Oklahoma Delawares, the Big House Ceremony, efforts to acquire a Delaware Big House to erect in Harrisburg, Delawares-as-women, etc. There are also at least 82 pages (in three folders) of Speck's field notes of ethnographic and linguistic data, and over 50 pages (in two folders) of Speck's miscellaneous notes (including some correspondence) on topics such as Gladys Tantaquidgeon and Delaware designs, botanical specimens, linguistic materials, museum specimens, the Walam Olum, the Six Nation Delaware reservation, the celestial bear theme, native religion, reviews of Speck's publications, etc. Other notes cover Delaware grammar and vocabulary, Delaware clans and social organization, dualism in Delaware religion, the influence of Christianity on Delaware religion, the provenance of Delaware museum specimens obtained from Delawares in Oklahoma and Canada, biographical information on Joseph Montur and Nicodemus Peters, etc. There are also various drafts, essays, lectures and other writings by Speck on topics such as Delaware religion, ceremonies, peyote rites, designs, population, remnant populations in the east, history, place names, a Delaware bibliography and a notebook of reports to the University of Pennsylvania Research Committee on fieldwork among Oklahoma Delaware, St. Francis Abenaki, Munsee and Six Nations Delaware, Tutelo, Cayuga, 1931-1936.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Inuit | Mojave
Alternate forms: Eskimo, Mohave
Language(s): English
Date: 1869-1898
Extent: 1 volume
Description: Dalton Dorr (1846-1901) was the curator, secretary, and director of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art in Philadelphia, the forerunner of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, from 1880-1899. This item is a journal, written in 1897, copied from his notes and from memory, of travels in Greenland (1869), the Indian Territory, Colorado and the Pacific coast (1872-73), and Paris, England, Scotland, and Ireland (1882-85), with some sketches. He took the Greenland cruise with Isaac I. Hayes in 1869, which was described by Hayes in his "Land of Desolation" (New York: Harper, 1872). See also a companion volume titled "Under the midnight sun: a pleasure cruise in Greenland” containing prints taken during that cruise in the summer of 1869. "Notes of Travel" contains seventeen black and white engravings of landscapes, glaciers, birds, Inuit dwellings, camps, and group portraits from the Greenland cruise, and eight small pencil sketches, by Dorr, of Native American territories along the Colorado River during his trip in 1872-73. These latter images include Arrowhead Mountain, Fort Yuma, and a Mohave man and dwelling. See finding aid for more information.
Collection: Notes of travel made from memoranda in old diaries [1869-1885], 1897-1898 (Mss.B.D735)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Odawa
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Ojibwa, Ojibway
Language(s): English | Ottawa
Date: 1926 and undated
Description: Materials relating to Radin's study of Odawa culture and history, with some Ojibwe material as well. Several items are headed "Ojibwa-Ottawa notes," though it is unclear from the descriptions provided what might be Odawa and what might be Ojibwe. Topics include Midewewin, religion, war and warfare, medicine and magic, death and burial, life cycle, games, ceremonialism, social organization, disease, dreams, and material culture. Items include a Nanabojo text concerning White Feather; ethnographic notes from published sources; 23 pages of male and female names; photographs (1926) with explanatory notes; typed slips and field notes on slips, most of them later transcribed for typed slips; and a 1-page letter signed Ake Sulkrantz and dated Stockholm, December 2, 1950. Two items are of particular note: 1) an unfinished manuscript relating 20 dreams of Miskwanda and 10 of Jim Pontiac, together with analysis. Chapters on legend and fact in the history of L'Arbre Croche and an ethnohistoric account based on the Jesuit Relations. Not included is a proposed account of "The culture of L'Arbre Croche as illustrated by Miskwanda's drawings." Interesting narrative of Radin's field work and methods and 2) 154 original drawings by Miskwanda--traced, arranged and commented on by Radin--intended to illustrate culture of L'Arbre Croche.
Collection: Paul Radin papers (Mss.497.3.R114)

Cherokee
Language(s): English
Date: 1893-1948
Extent: 19 pages
Description: This collection consists of 28 sketches, 8 black and white silver gelatin photographs, and 2 negatives of North Carolina Cherokee artifacts from ca. 1893-1948. Presumably collected by Frank Speck with John Witthoft during the latter's graduate field work, the images reflect the social life and customs of the Cherokee including war clubs, garments, Deer & Bear masks, rattles and dance formations. Of the dances presented are the Pigeon, Partridge, Corn, Beaver, Green Corn, and Ball game. Of note, an 1893 photograph by Mooney depicting Cherokee men and women in native attire at a ceremony before a ball game. The sketches are noted in Murphy Smith's Historical American Sketches.
Collection: Papers and drawings for Cherokee Indian materials (Mss.970.3.W78)

Abenaki | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1669; 1678; 1725-1796; 1809-1884; 1900-1995
Extent: 12 linear feet; 3 hrs. (audio)
Description: The Penobscot materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are concentrated in Series III. Siebert collected census material, treaties and treaty minutes, placenames, with a strong representation of songs, stories, and linguistic materials. There are detailed notes about Indian claims in Maine and genealogical information. There are also educational materials for the teaching of the Penobscot language as well as a wealth of information on Penobscot linguistics. Series V, Siebert's notebooks, have extensive grammatical, phonetic, and vocabulary of the Penobscot language. Both Series III and V reflect Siebert's deep interest in the history of Maine and the Eastern Abenaki including archaeological, pre-history, and colonial era documents such as the Eliot Bible, which Siebert owned a rare copy in his library, which was sold at auction. Series VI and VII contain various drafts of essays on Penobscot culture, language, and history. Series XII contains approximately 3 hours of Penobscot language recordings, primarily from the 1930s and 1950s.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Tunica | Caddo | Penobscot
Language(s): English
Date: 1940
Type:Text
Extent: 4 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's interest in Tunica language, history, and culture. Letters and notes from Robert Stuart Neitzel comprise the bulk of this assemblage, and include a two-page report about Tunica tanning of deer hides, together with a one-page letter of transmission and a two-page drawing; 28 pages on Tunica dances, including the green corn ceremony, along with letters about concerning field work among the Tunica and Caddo archaeology with a sketch of the digging; and 16 pages of miscellaneous notes, sketches, and correspondence on topics such as archaeology at Marksville, Louisiana (with sketches), Tunica museum specimens, phonetic transcriptions of dance names, a sketch of a Tunica scraper and hide drying frame, traps (with a sketch), Tunica tools, etc. There is also a letter to Speck from Frank Siebert concerning the linguistic field work of Mary Haas and publication of Speck's Penobscot texts.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)