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Lenape
Alternate forms: Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1825
Type:Text
Extent: 1 reel
Description: This is a forty-eight page report on Delaware culture and language, with selected words and phrases and their meanings, by C. C. Trowbridge in response to a 1823 questionnaire distributed by Lewis Cass. In part a criticism of Heckewelder and DuPonceau. Originals at the University of Michigan.
Collection: Account of some of the traditions, manners and customs of the Lenee Lenauppa Indians: traditions of the Lenee Lenaupee or Delawares: and, language of the Delawares, [ca. 1825] (Mss.Film.883)

Ahtna
Alternate forms: Ahtena
Language(s): English
Date: November 17, 1901; Undated (circa 1958)
Type:Text
Extent: 2 items
Description: See George Davidson letter from 1901 to Newell Wardle regarding the Copper River and the name "Atna" given to it by local native peoples. In undated section, see 8-page document by de Laguna, "Atna Indians, Copper River, Alaska," which includes names of consultants, contents of reels, and comments for the recordings cataloged as Mss.Rec.31.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Language(s): English | Spanish
Date: 1590-1976
Type:Text
Extent: 26 reels
Description: This collection includes field notes and reports, diaries of expeditions, texts, grammars, dictionaries of Indian languages, theses and research papers collected by members of the Department of Anthropology of the University of Chicago in connection with the Carnegie Institution of Washington Middle American Research Program as well as various Central American governmental agencies. A microfilm publication of the University of Chicago, 1946-1957. Table of contents. Originals at theUniversity of Chicago.
Collection: Manuscripts on Middle American Cultural Anthropology, 1590-1976 (Mss.Film.297)

Chickasaw | Choctaw | Catawba | Tutelo | Natchez | Caddo | Lenape | Meskwaki | Tunica | Beothuk | Montauk | Seminole | Cherokee | Yuchi | Creek
Alternate forms: Fox
Language(s): English
Date: 1915-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 18 folders
Description: This entry concerns materials relating to Speck's general study of Native American peoples, languages, and cultures east of the Mississippi, as well as to his activities as a consulted expert in the field. Includes Speck's miscellaneous notes on the southeast; notes on "tribal remnants" in the southeast; notes on shamanism in the northeast; notes on the 1941 symposium Man in Northeastern America; offprints, drafts, and synopses of the work of others, sometimes with Speck's notes, including several that were printed in Frederick Johnson's 1946 volume based on the symposium, Man in Northeastern North America; archaeological reports on southeastern pottery, mound sites, and the Georgia coast; a student's master's thesis on mound-builders; and letters from various correspondents regarding eastern Indian baskets, museum specimens, the sale of Indian art and specimens, the ethnohistory of the southeast, Indian place names, archaeological sites in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, scapulimancy, copies of Indian treaties from a museum in Nova Scotia, and other topics.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Haudenosaunee | Lenape | Catawba | Cherokee | Houma | Nanticoke | Abenaki | Cayuga | Tutelo | Onondaga | Mohawk | Tuscarora
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Lenape
Language(s): English
Date: 1777-1950, bulk 1914-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 23 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Haudenosaunee history, language, and culture. Includes correspondence with Haudenosaunee consultants like John L. Buck, Seth Newhouse, Josiah Hill, David S. Hill, etc., on topics ranging from the seizure of wampum by the Canadian government, Newhouse's request that Speck secure wampum for him, Newhouse's offer to sell Speck his history manuscript, which he has been working on since 1885 [#1650], Haudenosaunee burial customs, religion, etc.; an essay by Jesse Moses titled "The Long-House man, a Six Nations Indian of Canada speaks his mind," about the relationship of Christianity and the long-house religion; Speck's correspondence with William N. Fenton, principally concerning field work among the Catawba, Cherokee, and Houma but also touching on Fenton's Seneca field work, Speck's various studies of the Haudenosaunee, and the Second Conference on Iroquois Research; correspondence with other anthropologists about various aspects of Haudenosaunee history and culture such as material culture specimens, archaeology, historical sources, agriculture, education, warfare, religion, population statistics, etc.; a draft of Speck's "Reflections on Iroquois religion" and related correspondence; an undated document describing a meeting of Delaware, Nanticoke, and Canadian Iroquois in the presence of Speck and recounting the injustices suffered by Indians in United States and Canada; a copy of a 1777 treaty made by Peter F. Timothy, a Moravian Delaware, in August 1888, and transmitted to Speck by Jesse Moses; and Speck's research notes and other miscellaneous correspondence on topics such as masks, art, museum specimens, hunting territory, chiefships, words, warfare with the Abenaki, the Delaware-as-women theme, academic publications and conferences, etc.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Houma | Creek | Tohono O'odham | Akimel O'odham | Lenape
Alternate forms: Papago, Pima, Munsee
Language(s): English
Date: 1929-1947
Extent: 11 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Houma history and culture. Includes correspondence with Houma consultants such as members of the Billiot family, Ann Celestine, Dorothy Celestine, and Ben Paul about topics including museum specimens (a pirogue, beaded belts, baskets, blow guns, etc.), land questions, and schooling problems; correspondence with government officials and academic colleagues including Willard Beatty, William Zimmerman, Joseph McCaskill, Alice Marriott, and John Reed Swanton, and others regarding Speck's field work, various aspects of his research, and the social and economic conditions of the Houma people; a draft and copy of Speck's "Report...on Houma Indians" prepared for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, concerning the history and condition of the Houma and their educational needs; notes and correspondence regarding Houma medicine and traps; and Houma specimens consisting of six bone and wood points for canoe arrows and a model of canoe with two paddles.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Iowa | Meskwaki
Alternate forms: Chiwere, Oto, Fox, Sac and Fox
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1816-1957, bulk 1951-1957
Type:Text
Extent: 105 folders, 2 boxes
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately 105 folders and 2 boxes of materials directly pertaining to the Iowa have been identified. These materials include the George Pletsch and Sol Tax files in Series I. Correspondence; copies of secondary materials in Series II. Research Notes and Drafts B. Revitalization and Culture; two boxes of research notecards in Series III. Notecards; and Wallace's own written work in Series IV. Works by Wallace A. Professional. The bulk of Iowa material, however, relates to Wallace's work as an expert witness for Native American land claims and can be found in Series IX. Indian Claims. Often labeled under "Fox Indians" because of inter-related research and land claims, these items include research materials, tribal histories, dockets, trial memoranda, briefs, notes, reports, correspondence, etc., relating to the cases called "Iowa of Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma, et. al. vs. the United States of America" and "Iowa Tribe or Nation of Indians, et. al. vs. the United States of America." Among the research materials, there are folders devoted to the Black Hawk War, Bureau of Indian Affairs Records, treaties, ethnographic accounts, the history of the Territory of Iowa, and extracts from or copies of a variety of primary and secondary sources. Iowa materials can be difficult to disentangle from the materials relating to the closely related Meskwaki (Sac and Fox. Researchers are advised to also see the entry for that group and to view the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career and an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)

Lenape | Nanticoke | Pawnee | Shawnee | Cayuga | Mohawk | Haudenosaunee | Abenaki | Munsee | Tutelo
Alternate forms: Delaware, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Delaware
Date: 1895-1948
Extent: 57 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Delaware history, language, and culture. Speck's correspondence with Delaware collaborators in Oklahoma relating to Delaware history, ethnographic data, linguistics, museum specimens, and reservation affairs, etc., might be of particular interest; there are also several tales related by Witapanóxwe, or War Eagle, other tales and texts (some with interlineal translation) from Josiah Montour and other unknown contributors, and 11 sketches of Delaware art designs. Other correspondence touches on Speck's efforts to collect specimens (and individuals and institutions interested in acquiring them), his efforts to collect paintings and sketches of ceremonies and designs, his fieldwork and expenses, financial support from the University of Pennsylvania and Indiana Historical Society, Shawnee data on Oklahoma Delawares, the Big House Ceremony, efforts to acquire a Delaware Big House to erect in Harrisburg, Delawares-as-women, etc. There are also at least 82 pages (in three folders) of Speck's field notes of ethnographic and linguistic data, and over 50 pages (in two folders) of Speck's miscellaneous notes (including some correspondence) on topics such as Gladys Tantaquidgeon and Delaware designs, botanical specimens, linguistic materials, museum specimens, the Walam Olum, the Six Nation Delaware reservation, the celestial bear theme, native religion, reviews of Speck's publications, etc. Other notes cover Delaware grammar and vocabulary, Delaware clans and social organization, dualism in Delaware religion, the influence of Christianity on Delaware religion, the provenance of Delaware museum specimens obtained from Delawares in Oklahoma and Canada, biographical information on Joseph Montur and Nicodemus Peters, etc. There are also various drafts, essays, lectures and other writings by Speck on topics such as Delaware religion, ceremonies, peyote rites, designs, population, remnant populations in the east, history, place names, a Delaware bibliography and a notebook of reports to the University of Pennsylvania Research Committee on fieldwork among Oklahoma Delaware, St. Francis Abenaki, Munsee and Six Nations Delaware, Tutelo, Cayuga, 1931-1936.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Haudenosaunee | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Ojibwa
Language(s): English
Date: 1845-1881
Type:Text
Extent: 2 reels
Description: Materials of ethnologist and anthropologist Lewis Henry Morgan. Reel 1: Lorimer Fison and Alfred W. Howitt to Morgan, 1865-1881, 455 pages. Materials pertaining to geology, etc., 194 pages. Materials pertaining to Morgan's secret society, Grand Council of the Iroquois, by Morgan, 156 pages, by others, 105 pages. Rules, Constitutions, etc., 44 pages. Volume 1 of Morgan manuscript journals, 394 pages. Reel 2: Volumes 2-6 of Morgan manuscript journals, 453, 532, 385, 456, and 552 pages. The journal includes notes on travels to New York and Michigan, conversations, and Indian councils. Record of Indian letters [i.e., Record of the inquiry concerning the Indian system of relationship...], volume 1, letters sent, 230 pages; volume 2, letters received, 279 pages. (Includes related correspondence). Printed table of contents (1936). [See also, for descriptive contents, Rochester Historical Society Publication Fund Series 2: 83-97; and White (1959).] Originals in the Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester.
Collection: Lewis Henry Morgan journal and correspondence, 1845-1876 (Mss.Film.582)

Meskwaki | Iowa
Alternate forms: Fox, Sac and Fox
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1804-1990, bulk 1953-1956
Type:Text
Extent: 159 folders, 2 boxes
Description: The Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers are a vast collection of materials relating to Wallace's work at the intersection of anthropology, psychology, and history. Though further research might yield more results, approximately 159 folders and 2 boxes of materials directly pertaining to the Meskwaki (called the Fox, the Sac and Fox, and the Sauk and Fox in the finding aid) have been identified. These materials include the Nancy Lurie, George Pletsch, Louis Rocmes, and Sol Tax files in Series I. Correspondence; copies of secondary materials in Series II. Research Notes and Drafts B. Revitalization and Culture; two boxes of research notecards in Series III. Notecards; and Wallace's own written work (particularly for his 1990 publication "Prelude to Disaster: The Black Hawk War of 1832," and associated essays) in Series IV. Works by Wallace A. Professional. The bulk of Meskwaki material, however, relates to Wallace's work as an expert witness for Native American land claims and can be found in Series IX. Indian Claims under the labels "Fox Indians" and "Iowa Indians." These dual headings are due to inter-related research and land claims, and there is some overlap in the materials as Wallace used the same sources and notes to prepare for different land claims trials. These items include research materials, tribal histories, dockets, trial memoranda, briefs, notes, reports, testimonies, rebuttals, correspondence, etc., relating to the cases called "Iowa of Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma, et. al. vs. the United States of America," "Iowa Tribe or Nation of Indians, et. al. vs. the United States of America," and "Sac and Fox Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma, et. al. vs. the United States of America." Among the research materials, there are folders devoted to the Black Hawk War, Bureau of Indian Affairs Records, treaties, ethnographic accounts, the history of the Territory of Iowa, and extracts from or copies of a variety of primary and secondary sources. Researchers are advised to also see the Iowa entry and to view the finding aid for a detailed discussion of Wallace's long and varied career and an itemized list of the collection's contents.
Collection: Anthony F. C. Wallace Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.64a)