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Mi'kmaq
Alternate forms: Micmac
Language(s): English | Mi'kmaq
Date: circa 1915-1936
Type:Text
Extent: 3 folders
Description: Three items relating to Mi'kmaq (formerly Micmac) language and culture has been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. Two are in Subcollection I, Series. I Correspondence. Of greater interest is a file containing two letters (October 1938), two copies of the "Micmac Messenger" (1936), and a slip with the Lord's Prayer represented in both Mi'kmaq and English. These materials were apparently sent by Father Pacifique, a French Capuchin missionary to the Mi'kmaqs of Gaspé and author of "Micmac Grammar." The two letters touch on publication of the "Messenger," sign writing, and the Rand Micmac-English dictionary (which Pacifique pronounced "not so good"). Pacifique also briefly contrasted the "skillful" work of professional linguists with his own "practical" approach to the language. The other item is a brief note, also dated to October 1936, regarding a Mi'kmaq syllabary and other references. The author, signed "Em," also copied the first few lines of the Lords Prayer from a book in the "Clemens Library" [perhaps the Clements Library?], which is perhaps the slip found in the Pacifique folder. Finally, in Subcollection II, Series I. Correspondence, there is a letter from Frank Speck to Edward Sapir in which Speck mentions his manuscript and map of "Nova Scotia Micmac hunting territories," which he plans to send to Sapir.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Mi'kmaq | Innu | Naskapi
Alternate forms: Micmac, Montagnais
Language(s): English | Mi'kmaq | Innu-aimun | Naskapi
Date: 1797
Contributor: Pierronet, Thomas | Gabriel
Extent: 41 pages
Description: This is a comparative vocabulary of the Mi'kmaq (Micmac), Innu (Montagnais), and Naskapi (Nascapee, in the finding aid) languages. It includes Mi'kmaq prayers and a dictionary of Mi'kmaq pictographs. The latter includes 288 ink sketch pictographs of the Mi'kmaq language presented by Gabriel, a Mountaineer Indian, and transcribed by Thomas Pierronet in 1797. Includes three Christian prayers in pictorial sentences.
Collection: Specimen of the Mountaineer, or Sheshatapooshshoish, Skoffie, and Micmac Languages, 1797 (Mss.497.3.P61s)