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Mi'kmaq
Alternate forms: Micmac
Language(s): English | Mi'kmaq
Date: circa 1915-1936
Type:Text
Extent: 3 folders
Description: Three items relating to Mi'kmaq (formerly Micmac) language and culture has been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. Two are in Subcollection I, Series. I Correspondence. Of greater interest is a file containing two letters (October 1938), two copies of the "Micmac Messenger" (1936), and a slip with the Lord's Prayer represented in both Mi'kmaq and English. These materials were apparently sent by Father Pacifique, a French Capuchin missionary to the Mi'kmaqs of Gaspé and author of "Micmac Grammar." The two letters touch on publication of the "Messenger," sign writing, and the Rand Micmac-English dictionary (which Pacifique pronounced "not so good"). Pacifique also briefly contrasted the "skillful" work of professional linguists with his own "practical" approach to the language. The other item is a brief note, also dated to October 1936, regarding a Mi'kmaq syllabary and other references. The author, signed "Em," also copied the first few lines of the Lords Prayer from a book in the "Clemens Library" [perhaps the Clements Library?], which is perhaps the slip found in the Pacifique folder. Finally, in Subcollection II, Series I. Correspondence, there is a letter from Frank Speck to Edward Sapir in which Speck mentions his manuscript and map of "Nova Scotia Micmac hunting territories," which he plans to send to Sapir.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Mi'kmaq | Innu | Naskapi
Alternate forms: Micmac, Montagnais
Language(s): English | Mi'kmaq | Innu-aimun | Naskapi
Date: 1797
Contributor: Pierronet, Thomas | Gabriel
Extent: 41 pages
Description: This is a comparative vocabulary of the Mi'kmaq (Micmac), Innu-aimun (Montagnais, "Mountaineer"), and Naskapi ("Skoffie") languages. It includes Mi'kmaq prayers and a dictionary of Mi'kmaq pictographs. The latter includes 288 ink sketch pictographs of the Mi'kmaq language presented by Gabriel, an Innu man ("Mountaineer Indian,") and transcribed by Thomas Pierronet in 1797. Includes three Christian prayers in pictorial sentences.
Collection: Specimen of the Mountaineer, or Sheshatapooshshoish, Skoffie, and Micmac Languages, 1797 (Mss.497.3.P61s)