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Aztec
Language(s): English
Date: 1827-1897
Extent: 5 items
Description: Correspondence, an essay, and one image relating to Aztec materials at the American Philosophical Society. In the correspondence, Barabino writes that a "Mexican idol" intended for the APS has a broken face; Culin orders copies of "The Tribute Roll of Montezuma" by Brinton, Phillips, and Morris (Transactions, 1892) for J. F. Loubat; and Morris corresponds with Henry Phillips about the reproduction of the Montezuma tribute roll and Morris' work on the aforementioned article [Brinton, Phillips, and Morris (1892)]. Cushing's essay is based on the pictographic image: he identifies the APS's still image #443 as a copy of a codex in the Vatican, and superior to that printed in King (1831) in draftsmanship. The image itself is a black and white printed document, similar to that in King (1831), vol. 1, fac. 3, but (according to Cushing) better drawn and probably from a Vatican codex, although King's version is attributed to the Boturini Codex. See Boturini (1746):11 for details on manuscript.
Collection: American Philosophical Society Archives (APS.Archives)

Cree | Innu | Naskapi
Alternate forms: Montagnais, Nehiyaw
Language(s): English | Cree | Innu-aimun
Date: 1911-1931, 1936, 1938-1948
Extent: 6+ folders; 60+ photographs; 1 film
Description: The Cree material in the Frank Speck papers are scattered around multiple sections of the finding aid, mostly in Subcollection I, Series I. In this series, see item II(2A5), containing correspondence from P.G. Downes to Speck regarding Cree in Quebec. See item II(2F3), which includes notes from A. irving Hallowell to Speck regarding field work visiting Sweet Grass Cree, mentioning attitude of Cree to Leonard Bloomfield. Item II(4B9c) contains Speck's field notes on the Mistassini band, including notes on relationship between Cree and Montagnais languages, as well as museum specimens. Item II(2G1) includes Naskapi names in Cree syllabary; the Lord's Prayer in Cree; miscellaneous syllabary Cree words, and images of 79 pictographs. In Subcollection I, Series II, see correspondence with Claude Schaeffer regarding Rocky Boy Cree, and correspondence with Paul A. W. Wallace regarding Cree tales (Wissakutchek) collected by Edward Ahenakew in Alberta. In Subcollection I, Series III, there are 4 "Cree" photograph folders containing approximately 60 photographs. See also "Naskapi films," located in Subcollection II, Series IV, Photographs and Video, which includes some footage of some Cree people.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Mi'kmaq | Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Beothuk | Cherokee
Alternate forms: Micmac, Malecite
Language(s): English | Mi'kmaq
Date: 1909-1949
Type:Text
Extent: 8 folders
Description: Materials relating to Mi'kmaq history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's field notes on topics such as wampum, hunting territories, Cape Breton texts, Newfoundland traditions, the Passamaquoddy, etc., as well as a map with names of Bear River Band members and one piece of birch bark with pictographs inscribed; Speck's miscellaneous notes and correspondence on topics such as consultants, specimens, hieroglyphics, linguistics, fieldwork, Mi'kmaq and Cherokee, and the Mi'kmaq mission newspaper; a text on Mi'kmaq dance with interlinear translation, notes, and a musical score; 10 pages of linguistic notes and vocabulary collected along the Miramichi River, along with 6 pages of typed copy by John Witthoft; correspondence with Mechling concerning linguistic research on the Mi'kmaq, Malecite [Malecite-Passamaquoddy], and Oaxaca languages, Mi'kmaq burials, and historic materials on Beothuk and Mi'kmaq; a brief article on a traveler's account of the Mi'kmaq in 1822; an incomplete article or set of reading excerpts taken after 1922 by Speck from John G. Millais (1907); and extracts concerning the sweat house taken by Butler from the Jesuit Relations.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Mi'kmaq
Alternate forms: Micmac
Language(s): French | Mi'kmaq
Date: circa 1816-1820 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 5 items
Description: Part of a collection comprised of religious and linguistic materials in various Native American languages. Many were written by Jesuit missionaries of New France. These particular items include a catechism for Mi'kmaq children; a Mi'kmaq grammar copied by Rev. M. G. P. Cote, cure de Ste. Croix, and given by him to the Seminaire de Quebec in 1907; missionary Joseph-Marie Bellenger's book of Sunday sermons, including instructions and notes about the Mi'kmaq language (with Bellenger's observation that his notes are based on Maillard but that he has often had to supply endings), as well as a page of pictographs; Pierre-Antoine-Simon Maillard's manuscript containing religious doctrine and exercises, a table of deaths, notes on the principles of the French languages, and a table of contents, with a biographical note by Bellenger added in 1816 and 10 pages of pictographs with their meanings in Mi'kmaq; and Maillard's 1820 volume on the Mi'kmaq language, copied by Bellenger. Originals in the Archives de l'Archeveche de Quebec and at the Universite Laval, Seminaire de Quebec.
Collection: Selected materials, 1676-1930, on Indian linguistics (Mss.Film.453)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Saulteaux
Date: 1932-1949
Description: The Ojibwe materials in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers are extensive. Hallowell focused on three regions of Ojibwe territory: Berens River in north, central Canada (Pikangikum, Pauingassi, Poplar River; Little Grand Rapids First Nations) and Lac du Flambeau in Wisconsin. Hallowell was particularly interested in psychological anthropology. Both the Berens River and Lac du Flambeau materials in Series V, for example, includes ethnographic information on taboos, incest regulations, Rorschach tests, dreams, and acculturation. Hallowell's interests in traditional knowledge are represented by descriptions of the practice of the Midewiwin religion; traditional stories about Wisakedjak and Tcakabec/Chakabesh, Memegwesiug, Windigos, and Thunderbirds. Of particular interest in the Lac du Flambeau materials are hundred of pages of family biographies in Series V and photographs with the names of community members in Series VI, Subseries B. Of particular interest in the Berens River materials are maps of traditional hunting grounds, a diagram of Ojibwe cosmology, an autobiography by Hallowell's collaborator Chief William Berens, 29 folders of "Saulteaux Indians--Myths and Tales" all in Series V. There are hundreds of photographs from the region, with many community members identified, and all digitized, in Series VI, Subseries A. The correspondence, in Series I, includes Robert Ritzenhaler's description of a shaking tent ceremony by Ojibwe in Wisconsin; a detailed account of Joseph Fiddler's trial for murdering a windigo in the folder labled Royal Canadian Mounted Police; papers sent by Morton Teicher detailing incidents of windigo in Canada (50+ pages); a letter from Frances Densmore describing a shaking tent ceremony; and several letters from Chief William Berens providing information about Ojibwe people in the photographs in Series VI.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)