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Naskapi | Yurok
Language(s): English
Date: 1918-1945 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 10 items
Description: A variety of materials relating to Speck's study of diverse Algonquian peoples, cultures, and languages. Includes his "Remnants of the Eastern Indian Tribes," a brief discussion of location of New England Algonquians; his favorable review of John M. Cooper, "Snares, Deadfalls, and other Traps of Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapascans" [Printed, Speck (1939).]; a "Table of Double Curve Motif," charting techniques and variations of motifs of various Northwestern, Iroquoian, and central Algonquian peoples; a manuscript draft and additions of "Terms of relationship and the family territorial band among the Northeastern Algonquins," [Printed, Speck (1918).]; letters from Alanson Skinner challenging Speck's ethnic position of the Southeastern Algonquian on meaning of Eskimo-type artifacts found in Algonquian site in New York (State); materials from Eva L. Butler, including two pamphlets containing transcriptions of historical letters, principally from the Connecticut State Library--"Colonial Letters of our Ancestors" and "Letters of the Indians"--and "Botany and ethnozoology of the New England Indians," a bibliography of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century sources for ethnobotantical and ethnozoological references; letters from Edward Sapir concerning Speck (1918a), particularly Yurok comparisons, his excitement about reduction of language stocks, and possible typographical errors; and letters from Carl F. Voegelen concerning the usefulness of Speck's Naskapi material for comparative study of Algonquian languages and seeking an article on process by which Algonquian languages become extinct.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Algonquin | Naskapi | Cree | Nipissing | Ojibwe | Rama | Chibcha | Maya | Haudenosaunee | Ktunaxa
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Iroquois, Kutenai
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1912-1941 and undated
Extent: 7 items
Description: Materials relating to both Algonquin and related Algonquian peoples, cultures, and languages. Includes Speck's notes on artifacts found near Lake Abitibi and in the Nipissing district; his Seven Islands field notes, including texts with interlinear translations, house data, names of animals, and a letter in French from Marie Louise Ambroise; abstracts of Speck's published works on the Rama-Chibcha of Nicaragua, River Desert Algonquins, Southern Ontario Indians, Maya, and others; sketches and comments on shoulder blade divination (scapulimancy), including notes on deer drives (including an undated note from A. Irving Hallowell) and the distribution of artifacts among Algonquin, Naskapi, and Mistassini peoples; two field notebooks containing (1) linguistic notes and informant and population data for Waswanipi, Abitibi, Temiskaming [Timiskaming], Nipissing, Algonquian and (2) Temiskaming ethnography, Wisiledjak (Wiskyjack) [Wisakedjak, a manitou] text (in English), Temagami ethnology and texts (in English), and one Iroquois legend; general information on birch-bark containers, including 37 photographs and 40 pages of notes relating to Algonquin, Cree, Ojibwe and Ktunaxa specimens, and a letter from Bella Weitzner; and a letter from A. G. Bailey sending Speck a copy of his book on Algonquians.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Language(s): English
Date: 1822-1825
Type:Text
Genre: Microfilms | Notes | Maps
Extent: circa 250 pages
Description: A rough miscellany about antiquities in North and South America, as well as Europe and Asia, taken from published sources and personal observation. Contains a classification of antiquities, and descriptions of ancient monuments of Europe. Includes the author's "Ancient geography..." manuscript. Also includes maps and figures. Copy of original owned by the University Museum, University of Pennsylvania. See also Rafinesque (1838).
Collection: Ancient monuments of North and South America, 1822-1825 (Mss.Film.32)

Cherokee | Natchez
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1939-1975
Type:Text
Extent: 16 folders
Description: This collection documents the entire career of anthropologist and multi-facted intellectual Ashley Montagu from 1927 to 1999. The collection consists of 55.75 linear feet of material, organized into twelve series, plus oversize. Nearly half of the collection is Montagu's correspondence with colleagues, publishers, coauthors, and intellectuals from almost every discipline, as well as admirers from many different walks of life. There also several complete manuscripts of Montagu's work, including The Natural Superiority of Women, The Elephant Man, and The Anatomy of Swearing, as well as numerous journal and magazine articles authored by Montagu. The collection reflects the range of Montagu's intellectual interests and his influence across the spectrum of academic disciplines over his 60-year career. Montagu's writings on race, anthropology, and society, his correspondence with anthropologists and linguists like Franz Boas, Ruth Benedict, and C. F. Voegelin, and his class notes from anthropological coursework at Columbia University (including classes with Boas and Benedict), might yield material relating to Native Americans, but some specific items have also been identified. In the Correspondence series, there is an undated incoming item from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs. In the Works By series, there is an undated item labeled "The American Indian: The First Victim, Draft," 2 folders relating to North American archaeology ("The Earliest Account of the Association of Human Artifacts with Fossil Mammals in North America, Correspondence" [1951] and "The Earliest Account of the Association of Human Artifacts with Fossil Mammals in North America, Draft" [1944]), 2 folders with undated drafts about Natchez skeletal antomy ("The Natchez Innominate Bone, Draft" and "The Natchez Pelvis, Draft"), and 3 undated items in a folder labeled "Native Americans, Notes." In the Works By Others series, there is Rainer, John C., "Presentation of the American Indian," undated. In the Committees and Organizations series, there are 9 items dated to 1968 in "Association on American Indian Affairs" and 2 undated items in "Native Land Foundation." In the Printed Materials series, there is a copy of Hammel, Harold T., "Thermal and Metabolic Responses of the Alacaluf Indians to Moderate Cold Exposure" (1960), 13 items in a folder labeled "Indian Affairs" (1967-1972; 1975), and 9 items in "Native Americans" (1939-1967). Of particular interest might be materials relating to Sequoya and the invention of the Cherokee syllabary, including "Sequoya, Notes," "Sequoya, Correspondence," (1960-1961), and "Sequoya, Cherokee Indian Genius who Invented an Alphabet and so Brought Literacy to his People, Drafts," all in the Works By series.
Collection: Ashley Montagu papers, 1927-1999 (Mss.Ms.Coll.109)

Aymara | Quechua
Language(s): English | Aymara | Spanish
Date: 1950-1972
Description: The Aymara materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist of comparative linguistics and studies of kinship in Series II. Of particular interest are the audio recordings in Series VII on the folklore of the Ayar Incas. The correspondence, in Series I, contains information of the geographic distribution of the language, Lounsbury's analysis of the language and its relationship to Quechua, Christian scriptures in Aymara, Morris Swadesh's work on genetic classification of Native American languages, and geographic distribution of Aymara population.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Catawba | Cherokee | Tutelo
Language(s): English | Catawba | Tutelo
Date: 1716; 1803; 1951-1997
Extent: 7 boxes
Description: The Catawba materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are primarily concentrated in Series II. These consist of copies of secondary sources such as an "Indian Vocabulary from Fort Christanna, 1716, Catawba census notes, 1830-1929, land claim agreements, and a dictionary of Place names in South Carolina. Original materials include hundreds of pages of Siebert's FIeld notes and a Catawba vocabulary / dictionary done with Wes Taukchiray.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Maya
Language(s): English | Spanish
Date: 1926-1959
Type:Text
Extent: Circa 455 leaves; circa 635 pages;
Description: The Central America materials, John Alden Mason Papers include correspondence regarding linguistic, archaeological, and ethnological work in Mexico and Guatemala; meetings; etc. Regarding archaeological work in Guatemala, Mexico, and Panama. Regarding Piedras Negras, Guatemala; Chichen Itza; archaeological work in Guatemala and Mexico. Regarding archaeological work in Guatemala, Mexico, and Texas. Regarding Pima; Yaqui; Piedras Negras, Guatemala; Maya glyphs and architecture; archaeological work in Guatemala, Mexico, and British Honduras. The bulk of the material is from 1933-1939 and concerns archaeological work at Piedras Negras, Guatemala. Some discussion of the Mayan calendar, the ruins at Yaxchilan, Mexico, and a 1953 expedition to the Caracol Ruins, Honduras. Scholarly materials: Article for [Lilly de Jongh] Osborne's handbook of Guatemala regarding the ruins of Piedras Negras, Guatemala. A paper entitled, "Los cuatro grandes filones linguisticos de Mexico y Centroamerica" for the International Congress of Americanists, Mexico, August 1939. A paper read at meeting of the American Anthropological Association, December 1938, on the genetic classification of Middle American languages. Bibliographies of books and a few manuscripts on Indians of Central America, Mexico, and South America; letter from Zelig Harris to Mason; Mason's reply. Paper sent to Mason to be read at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Discusses Hokan-Siouan Phylum, Tarascan, Macro-Otomanguean Phylum, Macro-Penutian Phylum, and Macro-Chibchan Phylum. Notes on genetic relationships and geographic distribution. Mostly from published sources. A compilation and juxtaposition of various opinions. A talk given before Sociedad de geografia e historia de Guatemala regarding the architecture of Piedras Negras. English original which was translated into Spanish for publication in Anales 15 (December 1938): pages 202-216. A paper "Middle American Linguistics, 1955" by Norman A. McQuown; draft of a paper by Mason discussing that of McQuown; a copy of Mason's paper as delivered at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association, November 17, 1955, Boston; a copy of Mason's paper as corrected for correspondence with Robert J. Weitlaner and Gordon R. Willey.
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Chickasaw | Choctaw | Catawba | Tutelo | Natchez | Caddo | Lenape | Meskwaki | Tunica | Beothuk | Montauk | Seminole | Cherokee | Yuchi | Creek
Alternate forms: Fox
Language(s): English
Date: 1915-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 18 folders
Description: This entry concerns materials relating to Speck's general study of Native American peoples, languages, and cultures east of the Mississippi, as well as to his activities as a consulted expert in the field. Includes Speck's miscellaneous notes on the southeast; notes on "tribal remnants" in the southeast; notes on shamanism in the northeast; notes on the 1941 symposium Man in Northeastern America; offprints, drafts, and synopses of the work of others, sometimes with Speck's notes, including several that were printed in Frederick Johnson's 1946 volume based on the symposium, Man in Northeastern North America; archaeological reports on southeastern pottery, mound sites, and the Georgia coast; a student's master's thesis on mound-builders; and letters from various correspondents regarding eastern Indian baskets, museum specimens, the sale of Indian art and specimens, the ethnohistory of the southeast, Indian place names, archaeological sites in Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, scapulimancy, copies of Indian treaties from a museum in Nova Scotia, and other topics.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Cree | Flathead | Inca | Haudenosaunee | Kaingang | Kiowa | Maya | Natchez | Navajo | Ojibwe | Pawnee | Sahaptin | Purépecha | Seneca | Zuni
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Navaho, Ojibwa, Saulteaux, Sioux, Tonawanda, Tarascan, Tarasco
Language(s): English
Date: 1935-1937
Type:Text
Genre: Notes
Extent: 2 volumes, 150 p.
Description: These items include notes on "primitive economics" (Incan) for A. Irving Hallowell and from seminars with Linton Satterthwaite (on Mayan architecture), E. B. Howard (on problems of the Clovis site in New Mexico), and others at the University of Pennsylvania. There are also notes taken at the 1936 meeting of the American Anthropological Association of papers by various anthropologists in attendance, including Ruth Benedict, Frederica de Laguna, Waiter Dyk, William N. Fenton, Alfred V. Kidder, David G. Mandelbaum, George P. Murdock, Arthur C. Parker, Elsie Clews Parsons, Gladys A. Reichard, William A. Ritchie, Linton Satterthwaite, Gene Weltfish, and others regarding Cree, Flathead, Iroquois (Haudenosaunee), Kaingang (Southern Brazil), Kiowa, Mayan, Natchez, Navajo, Ojibwa, Pawnee, Pueblos, Sahaptin, Saulteaux, Siouan, Tarascan, Tonawanda (Seneca), Zuni, etc.
Collection: Ernestine H. Wieder Singer notes (Mss.970.1.Si6)

Maya | Mixe | Zuni | Tzeltal | Bororo
Date: 1963-1995
Description: The Maya materials in the Lounsbury Papers are extensive. The correspondence in Series I includes a Motul (Mayan) dictionary, discussion about translating Maya glyphs and calendrical calculations, the Popol Vuh. Series II consists of articles and manuscripts from a project identified as "Maya kinship unfin. project." Much of this work is focused on interpreting Maya hieroglyphs. In Series VII there are a number of recordings of Yucatec Maya made in the 1960s focused on vocabulary. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a dictionary by Rene Acuna, Lloyd Anderson's Etymologies of Mayan calendrical and astronomical terms, Anthony Aveni's interpretation of Maya hieroglyphs, Brent Berlin's decipherment of Maya hieroglyphs, Gordon Brotherston's comments on FGL's manuscript on Maya dates, Lyle Campbell's bibliography of Mayan linguistics, Wallace Chafe on how FGL got into the study of Maya hieroglyphics, Michael Coe's report that Soviets were successful in using a computer to translate Maya hieroglyphs, R. David Drucker's comparison of Aztec and Maya calendars, Dieter Dutting on Maya hieroglyphs; transformational analysis of Yucatec.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)