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Blackfoot
Alternate forms: Siksika
Language(s): English | Blackfoot
Date: circa 1930s-1960s
Type:Text
Extent: 13 folders, 2 boxes
Description: The C. F. Voegelin Papers contain correspondence, card files, notes, notebooks, Vocabularies, and other linguistic and ethnographic materials relating to Blackfoot language and culture. These are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II of the Voegelin Papers. Materials in Subcollection I include 2 boxes of card files (mostly vocabulary) and 2 folders of document files in Series II. Card Files. Of particular interest in Folder #1 might be some notes on vocabulary and eight pages of an incomplete letter, apparently to Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, from someone based at the Blackfoot agency doing fieldwork under the auspices of Clark Wissler and working with Mr. Calfchild. The writer mentions societies, exogamy, kinship, reciprocity, bands, etc. Folder #2 contains child-focused material including typed texts (mostly sporadic comments) obtained from children, fragments of typed observations about children's interactions and language use, and a two-page list of 24 Blackfoot children, with their full names, ages, and sometimes notes about their fluency or references to texts and other works for which these individuals were apparently consulted. There is also a bundle of texts, mostly about Blackfoot societies and their origins, labeled "Old Bull (Shultz's Informant)" [Possibly a reference to James Willard Schultz (1859-1947)]. Continuing with Subcollection I, there is also 1 folder of undated linguistic notes in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A: Language Notes; a folder containing the typed transcript of a dialogue (between children at play) between Velma Bear Hat and Margaret Water Chief in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-B: Text; and 3 undated folders in Series VI. Notebooks (which were described in detail by Richard A. Rhodes, Department of Linguistics at the University of California-Berkeley, in 1988, and include vocabulary, stories, work on paradigms, vowel clusters, suffixes, numerals, kinship terms, and some ethnographic information in #3). Blackfoot materials in Subcollection II include correspondence with Oscar Lewis (regarding Blackfoot culture and linguistic classfication, particularly in relation to Kutenai, and including a paper Lewis sent and Voegelin's response) and Edward Sapir (mentioning work on Blackfoot, Algonquin and Wiyot) in Series I. Correspondence; and several folders in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian. The latter contain Blackfoot grammatical notes, Blackfoot prefixes, sketches of Blackfoot designs, and 8 notebooks. Blackfoot notebooks 1-7 contain stories (Blackfoot with interlinear English), Vocabularies, and names of speakers, and a separate unnumbered Blackfoot notebook contains ethnographic notes in English, though some Blackfoot terms and phrases are included.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Language(s): English | Ho-Chunk
Date: 1908-1930 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 49 items
Description: Materials relating to Radin's study of Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) history, culture, and language. Some items are written in Ho-Chunk, with and without English translations. This large collection includes 34 original field notebooks; numerous short and long stories (Hare cycle, Aleck Linetree [probably Alec Lone Tree], the origin of the Buffalo clan, the story of the holy one, the boy who wished to be immortal, etc.); several longer pieces, such as a typed manuscript titled "The legend of Mother-of-all-the-Earth," speeches of Charlie Houghton, multiple versions of "How Blowsnake joined the medicine dance," "Origin myth of the medicine dance," etc.; several published secondary sources; over 3,000 slips for an English-Winnebago [i.e. Ho-Chunk] dictionary and other items relating to Ho-Chunk phonetics, lexicon, linguistics, etc.; several phonetic texts, some with English translation; and a variety of other items with ethnographic, historical, and linguistic data pertaining to ceremonies, tales, clans, medicine, origins, dance, burial, peyote, names, and sweat-baths. Individuals mentioned (some as ) include: Jacob Russell, Charlie Houghton, Oliver LaMere, Sam Blowsnake, John Rave, Thomas Clay, Robert Lincoln, James Smith, Tom Big Bear, and George Ricehill.
Collection: Paul Radin papers (Mss.497.3.R114)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Eskimo
Language(s): English
Date: c. 1930-1937
Extent: 3 folders
Description: The Inuit materials in the Hallowell Papers include notes on ethnographic materials, analyses of myths, shamanism, property, racial identification, anthropometry, and somaltology. There are newspaper clippings, one entitled "Artic Adventure" by Peter Freuchen and reading notes from secondary sources.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Mi'kmaq | Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Beothuk | Cherokee
Alternate forms: Micmac, Malecite
Language(s): English | Mi'kmaq
Date: 1909-1949
Type:Text
Extent: 8 folders
Description: Materials relating to Mi'kmaq history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's field notes on topics such as wampum, hunting territories, Cape Breton texts, Newfoundland traditions, the Passamaquoddy, etc., as well as a map with names of Bear River Band members and one piece of birch bark with pictographs inscribed; Speck's miscellaneous notes and correspondence on topics such as consultants, specimens, hieroglyphics, linguistics, fieldwork, Mi'kmaq and Cherokee, and the Mi'kmaq mission newspaper; a text on Mi'kmaq dance with interlinear translation, notes, and a musical score; 10 pages of linguistic notes and vocabulary collected along the Miramichi River, along with 6 pages of typed copy by John Witthoft; correspondence with Mechling concerning linguistic research on the Mi'kmaq, Malecite [Malecite-Passamaquoddy], and Oaxaca languages, Mi'kmaq burials, and historic materials on Beothuk and Mi'kmaq; a brief article on a traveler's account of the Mi'kmaq in 1822; an incomplete article or set of reading excerpts taken after 1922 by Speck from John G. Millais (1907); and extracts concerning the sweat house taken by Butler from the Jesuit Relations.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Mohegan | Pequot | Yuchi | Nanticoke
Language(s): English | Mohegan-Pequot
Date: 1897-1943
Type:Text
Extent: 10 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Mohegan language, history, and culture. Includes Mohegan miscellaneous notes and correspondence from 1916-1943 including commentary on Fidelia Fielding's Texts, notes for 1920 Pequot trip with Nehantic and Pennacook notes, letters from the Honorable Thomas W. Bicknell to Speck concerning Indians in Rhode Island, notes on Mohegan social organization, 1 page of incomplete letter of Red Wing concerning Indian affairs, miscellaneous Stockbridge notes, George Heye to Speck regarding publication, John R. Swanton to Speck concerning his exhibition for Mohegan Stockbridge, postal card from Princess Pretty War regarding dress, Ernest E. Rogers to Speck regarding Speck's Mohegan-Pequot Diary, etc.; Pequot miscellaneous notes and correspondence from 1922-1941 including two cards with Mohegan names, 7 pages of reading notes, 1 page of animal names, a letter from Harral Ayres to the Smithsonian Institution concerning Connecticut place names, and a letter from Gertrude Bell Browne to Speck concerning seventeenth-century Pequot-Mohegan Mohegan-Pequot texts and vocabulary materials, notes and drafts relating to Speck (1928a); letters to his mother concerning his activities among Indians at Mohegan, Connecticut; copy for a news release on a Mohegan election; "Mohegan Land Deeds," a pamplet containing 22 seventeenth-century deeds signed by Connecticut Mohegan Indians, taken from Connecticut archival sources; 21 cards with notes on trees and uses of their products; Prince's 1907 letter of recommendation for Speck, discussing Speck's work, as a student, on the Pequot dialect of Mohegan-Pequots, Algic, and Yuchi; and Ward's correspondence with Speck regarding the printing of extra copies of Speck's Nanticoke study by the Historical Society of Delaware.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Ahousaht | Cheklesahht | Ehattesaht | Hesquiaht | Hupacasath | Huu-ay-aht | Kyuquot | Mowachaht | Muchalaht | Nuu-chah-nulth | Tla-o-qui-aht | Toquaht | Tseshaht | Uchucklesaht | Ucluelet
Alternate forms: Aht, Clayoquot, Nootka, Nutka, Ohiaht, Opetchesaht, Tahkaht
Language(s): English | Nuu-chah-nulth
Date: 1895-1952 (bulk 1910-1914, 1931-1935)
Extent: 5600+ loose pages, 66,000+ slips, 29 notebooks
Description: The Nuu-chah-nulth materials in the ACLS collection consist of a large body of various materials primarily collected by Franz Boas, Edward Sapir, George Hunt, and Morris Swadesh. The majority of the content pertains to Hupacasath and Tseshaht people in the Alberni Valley area, with the exception of the Hunt materials, which were recorded in the Yuquot area, Mowachaht territory. All of these materials are found in the "Nootka" section of the finding aid, which contains a full, detailed listing. The Boas materials are consist of a lexicon of 1500+ word slips dating from the 1890s. Hunt's "Nootka Tales" consist of large body of traditional stories written in English and later typed up by Sapir with additional notes. Sapir's materials comprise the bulk of this section overall. See especially his extremely voluminous "Miscellaneous Nootka material," the final item in the "Nootka" section, for which a detailed table of contents is available upon request. This set of materials includes 24 field notebooks with extensive stories (some unpublished or untranslated) and ethnographic notes, as well of 80 folders of typed up notes from the notebooks, arranged into categories. It also includes some photographs, censuses of Nuu-chah-nulth "bands" (1920-1921), and 10 folders notes derived by Sapir (and Swadesh?) from "NW Coast Sources and Archives," pertaining to the region more broadly, including information on Coast Salish culture and history. Finally, Swadesh's materials include some additional ethnographic and linguistic field work, as well as extensive bodies of linguistic analysis of materials recorded by Sapir and himself.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Anishinaabe | Ojibwe | Seneca | Haudenosaunee | Cree | Naskapi | Innu
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Ojibway, Chippewa, Iroquois
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1927-1949
Type:Text
Extent: 14 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Ojibwe language, history, and culture. Includes 15 pages of Tamagami [Temagami First Nation] myths and five texts in English; 21 pages of Matagama Ojibwe [Mattagami First Nation] notes, including a 2-page phonetic key, a letter from Speck to Samuel (i.e., James) Miller of Gogama requesting ethnographic and map data, 2 maps (one of Mattagami hunting territories), typed reading notes, and a sketch of a play for Mattagama Otcipwe [sic]; a Christmas circular letter telling the story of a Chippewa [Ojibwe] boy returning home for Dance; a copy of Speck's favorable review of Sister Bernard Coleman, "Decorative designs of the Ojibwa of northern Minnesota" [Printed, Speck (1949).]; and a brief popular account on Ojibwe hunting territories by Speck, refuting Roosevelt (1889-1896), who had denied that Indians have a sense of property, along with two pages of notes. Also includes several folders of correspondence, including correspondence with A. I. Hallowell in which Hallowell describes a field trip to the Berens River Saulteaux, Sweet Grass Cree (mentions attitude of Cree to Leonard Bloomfield), and Cold Lake Chipewyan, festivals, etc., and a letter from Speck to Hallowell with pencilled responses of Hallowell to questions asked; letters from D. H. Learmouth, a factor for Hudson's Bay Company at Waswanippi, recounting his experiences in adjudicating Matagama land inheritance and providing ethnographic data sought by Speck from Samuel (i.e., James) Miller of Gogama and data on hunting territories; letters from James E. Holden concerning unsuccessful attempts to purchase baskets at Nipigon; letters from J. Allan Burgesse regarding the Matagama Ojibwe and enclosing a drawing of a "flesher"and a list of hunting territories and biographical information on owners; a letter from Robert Solenberger concerning Tonawanda [Seneca] and Chippewa [Ojibwe] women who make baskets and giving their addresses; a letter from B. W. Thayer concerning Ojibwe beadwork found during a Minnesota field trip; a letter from Henry Woodman discussing the decline of crafts among Bear Island Indians (Temagami); a letter from Prentice Gilbert Downes about the circumboreal region, disucssing his visit to Naskapi near Davis Inlet, to Cree, and to Chippewas, along with 2 pages of notes (Speck?) in French-English, discussing changes in Indian culture; and a letter from Speck to Chief Mitchele Buckshot in Maniwaki, Quebec requesting buckskin and beadwork.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Penobscot | Passamaquoddy | Maliseet | Mi'kmaq | Haudenosaunee | Abenaki | Lenape | Mohegan | Mohican | Zuni | Navajo | Tutelo | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Iroquois, Micmac, Lenape, Mahican, Malecite
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1908-1947
Extent: 27 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Penobscot language, history, and culture, and his preparation of his book Penobscot Man. This includes several folders of Speck's field notes, notes organized around specific topics (including data not used in Speck's published works), copies and drafts of lectures and essays, correspondence, etc. Topics include Penobscot social organization, calendar system, house furnishings, hunting morality, animal lore, religion, art, sayings, alphabet, counting and measuring, canoe-making, face-painting, texts with interlineal translations, and "Bird Lore of the Northern Indians" (a faculty public lecture at the University of Pennsylvania). Additionally, significant correspondence concerns the preparation, expenses, dissemination, and reception of his Penobscot publications. Other topics of correspondence include Ethel Gandy's monograph on Penobscot art; names of chiefs and their clans; "clown" performances outside of the southwest among the Penobscot, Iroquois [Haudenosaunee], Abenaki, and Delaware; place names; the relationship of Penobscot-Mohegan and Mahican; a comparison of Zuni-Navajo and Red Paint; Tutelo. There is a particularly large folder of Speck's miscellaneous Penobscot notes containing both a variety of notes and correspondence from Penobscot consultants as well as non-Native colleagues. These include letters from Roland E. Nelson (Needahbeh, Penobscot) concerning drum for exhibit; letters from Nelson, Franz Boas, John M. Cooper, William B. Goodwin, E. V. McCollum, and J. Dyneley Prince, all concerning Penobscot Man; Clifford P. Wilson concerning moosehair embroidery; Edward Reman concerning Norse influence on Penobscot; Carrie A. Lyford concerning moose-wool controversy and Ann Stimson's report; Ann Stimson, letter of thanks; Henry Noyes Otis concerning genealogy of Indians named Sias on Cape Cod (Speck marked this Penobscot); Princess Pretty Woman (Passamaquoddy) concerning her dress (apparently at the Penn Museum); Dorothy Ranco (Penobscot) concerning Princess Pretty Woman's dress; Roland W. Mann, concerning site of Indian occupancy according to Penobscot tradition; Ryuzo Torii, letter of introduction. Other miscellaneous items include a 5-page transcript of agreements between Indians of Nova Scotia and the English, August 15, 1749; 2 pages, transcript of agreement of July 13, 1727 (letter of transmittal, Lloyd Price to Miss MacDonald, September 24, 1936); Ann K. Stimson, Moose Wool and Climbing Powers of the American Mink; miscellaneous field notes on topics like songs, kinship, totem, medicine, and social units; and 4 pages of Penobscot words and their cultural use.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)