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Cochiti
Alternate forms: Kotyit
Date: 1919-1940, 1957
Type:Text
Extent: 552 pages, 6 notebooks
Description: The Cochiti materials in the ACLS collection consist of several items in multiple sections of the finding aid. In the "Cochiti" section of the finding aid, there is a set of 5 field notebooks recorded by Boas in 1921-1922 containing his original field notes, texts, Vocabularies, paradigms, and notes in German shorthand. A second set of loose-leaf notes consists of texts with interlinear translations derived from the notebooks, 20 of which were later rendered into free translations by Ruth Benedict and published in 1931. In the "Keresan" section, Boas' "Keresan word list and linguistic notes" contains 8 folders of Laguna and Cochiti grammatical, linguistic, folkloristic, and ethnographic materials. His "Keresan lexical file" contains 8,000 Keresan terms, with some references to manuscripts from which they were derived, many of which are likely Cochiti. (This file may contain Western Keres as well.) In the "Laguna" section of the finding aid, Boas' "Laguna Vocabularies and texts" includes Keresan, Laguna, and Cochiti Vocabularies, grammatical notes, and texts. Lastly, in the "Tewa" section, "Cochiti and San Juan Pueblo songs" contains words, music, paraphrase of text, lists of ceremonial terms, and a "Phonologic chart for Cochiti Keresan and Tewa-Tanoan." NOTE: Portions of this material may be restricted due to potential cultural sensitivity.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Abenaki | Cherokee | Delaware | Mohawk | Munsee | Onondaga | Penobscot
Alternate forms: Lenape, Lenni-Lenape
Language(s): English | Delaware | Cree | Munsee | Cherokee | Onondaga
Date: 1930-1941; 1981-1983
Description: The Delaware materials in the Siebert collection can be found in Series IV, V, VII. Most of the materials are from secondary sources. Of interest is geographic diversity of Delaware materials ranging from Oklahoma to the Six Nations' reserve in Ontario to Moraviantown. There are also a number of Munsee recordings in Series XII.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Ditidaht
Date: ca.1931-1972
Subject: Linguistics | Music
Extent: 1.5 linear feet
Description: The most noteworthy aspect of Mary Haas' Ditidaht file, stemming from fieldwork conducted with Morris Swadesh as her first fieldtrip, is a fairly detailed transcription of songs collected. Series 2 contains the transcriptions and Series 10 the cassette copies, while the original tapes are housed at the Indiana University Archives of Traditional Music. There is much overlap with Nuu-chah-nulth, as Haas frequently identified correspondences between them. A sizeable lexical file (Series 9) and correspondence with many, especially Edward Sapir and George Herzog (Series 1) may also be of interest.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Guarani | Quechua | Aymara | Maya
Date: 1936-1950
Description: The Guarani materials in the Lounsbury Papers can be found in multiple sections of the collection. In Series I, there is correspondence from Rahder, Rubin, and Tulchin. In Series II, in the "Other Languages and Cultures of the Americas" section, there are Lounsbury's notes, "Têtagüá Sapucài (Grito del Pueblo)," which accompany sound recordings. In the "South America" section of Series II, see Fieldnotes #5, under "Brazil," and "Terena and Guarani Wire Recordings Tables of Contents." In Series VII, there are two sets of digitized recordings, "Paraguayan Popular Music" and "Terena-Guarani." Of special interest among the audio is the "Story of the Guarani creator, Tupi, and the creation of the Guarani people" told by Pedro Coelho de Suza.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Ho-Chunk
Alternate forms: Winnebago
Date: 1950
Subject: Music | Medicine | Religion
Genre: Notebooks | Songs
Description: The Ho-Chunk materials in the Lounsbury Papers consists of a large number of recordings of George LaMere singing Buffalo Dance, Medicine, War Party Dance song, etc. The correspondence, in Series I, consists of Winnebago songs by George LaMere including a list of songs and typescript of LaMere's introductory comments listed under Robert E. Ritzenthaler,
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Hupa
Alternate forms: Na:tini-xwe
Language(s): Hupa | English
Date: 1950-1962
Extent: 0.75 linear feet
Description: Haas' Hupa file is mostly comprised of published and unpublished work by others, most notably Mary Woodward and Edward Sapir. Series 1 includes correspondence with both Mary Woodward and Victor Golla on Hupa fieldwork and research. Chimariko and Hupa card files in Series 9 include lexica, phonological analysis and ethnographic notes, and are derived from work by Sapir and Woodward, including transcriptions by Woodward herself. Haas' Yurok field notebook in Series 2 includes a 12-page Hupa section with consultants Ned Jackson and Sam Brown, consisting of a basic lexicon and some grammatical paradigms. There are also some additional morphological and phonological analyses in the same series with notes from an unidentified author (possibly Woodward), and Haas made use of Hupa as an exercise in phonological reconstruction. Copies of materials housed at the Berkeley Language Center are also present in Series 10, and have been digitized, available at the APS Digital Library.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Inuit
Alternate forms: Aivilik, Eskimo, Inuk, Inuttitut, Nunatsiavut
Date: 1883-1929
Extent: 184 pages; 2900 slips; 18 drawings
Description: The Inuit materials in the ACLS collection consists of several items in the "Eskimo" section of the finding aid. The core materials are Boas' fieldwork materials from Baffinland in 1883, his first fieldwork trip. "Eskimo ethnographic notes from Baffinland" includes vocabulary, texts, and ethnographic notes. "Eskimo texts" includes several text written in syllabic script, and includes other texts as well, some with interlinear translations, and additional vocabulary lists. This material comes from Hamilton Inlet (Labrador), Hudson Bay, and Cumberland Sound. "Eskimo interlinear texts" includes brief additional texts. Boas' "Eskimo lexicon" consists of an extensive German-Inuit vocabulary file of over 2900 slips. Boas' "Eskimo Songs" consists of song texts with translations. Lastly, "Eskimo folklore" consists of materials on stories, customs, and cooking and building methods, sent to Boas by George Comer, largely from the Southampton Island and Repulse Bay region. A table of content of the Comer materials is available upon request.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

A'wa'etłala | K'ómoks | Da'naxda'xw | Dzawada'enuxw | Gopinuxw | Gusgimukw | Gwa'sala | Gwatsinuxw | Gwawa'enuxw | Kwakwaka'wakw | Kwagu'ł | Kwikwasutinuxw | Ławitsis | Ma'a̱mtagila | Mamalilikala | Nak'waxda'xw | Namgis | Tłatłasikwala | Wiwekam | Wiweqayi
Alternate forms: Gwasilla, Gwawaenuk, K'omoks, Koskimo, Kwakiutl, Kwicksutaineuk, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nakoaktok, Nakwoktak, Nimpkish, Quatsino, Tanakteuk, Tlowitsis, Tsawataineuk, Weiwaikai, Weiwaikum
Language(s): English | German | Kwak'wala
Date: 1893-1951
Extent: Approx. 10,000 loose pages, 10 notebooks, 7000+ cards, 10+ maps
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the ACLS collection are located predominantly in the "Kwakiutl" section of the finding aid, which contains a full listing of all materials. Some of the larger individaul sets of materials listed within this section also have their own specific tables of contents (available upon request) detailing their often highly diverse contents. Overall, the vast majority of the material is made of of 1) manuscripts sent to Boas by George Hunt from the 1890s to the 1930s, frequently in both Kwak'wala and English, covering a very broad range of Kwakwaka'wakw history, culture, languages, customs, and traditions; and 2) field work materials recorded by Boas and Boas' own analyses of material sent by Hunt, covering a similar range of topics. Additional materials by other individuals focus especially on linguistic and ethnographic matters. Also see the "Kwakiutl materials, Franz Boas Papers," for information on the correspondence between Boas and Hunt, which gives additional context to the materials in the ACLS collection.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Gusgimukw | Gwawa'enuxw | Haida | Kwakwaka'wakw | Nak'waxda'xw | Nuu-chah-nulth
Alternate forms: Kwakiutl, Koskimo, Laich-kwil-tach, Lekwiltok, Nootka, Quatsino
Language(s): English | Kwak'wala
Date: undated, and 1920-1942
Type:Text
Extent: 12+ folders; 4 notebooks
Description: The Kwakwaka'wakw materials in the Franz Boas Professional Papers consist of numerous folders containing Kwakwaka'wakw stories (some by George Hunt), notes on songs (much of it by the Namgis chief, Dan Cranmer), ethnographic and historical information, and linguistic notes on the Kwak'wala language. See items listed under "Boas, Franz -- Kwakiutl," for some materials, including those by Dan Cranmer. Under "Hunt, George - Kwakiutl," there are notebooks and texts, including 6 texts in Boas's hand in Kwak'wala with English interlinear translation. These includes "Host Speech for great great feast," two texts on "Supernatural Experience" and marriage told by Mrs. George Hunt, and Hë'mănis told by Gi'galas (Gwawa'enuxw), with revised version written by George Hunt. Finally, see the folder labeled "Kwakiutl material (on names)," which contains lists of names of plants, birds, specific people, positions, coppers, and other matters, primarily provided by Dan Cranmer.
Collection: Franz Boas Personal and Professional Papers (Mss.B.B61p)

Muscogee | Seminole | Yuchi
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English | Muscogee | Yuchi
Date: 1904-1947
Extent: 14 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Creek history, language, and culture. Includes Speck's own notes and work, including "Notes on Social and Economic Conditions Among the Creek Indians of Alabama in 1941" (published as Speck 1947); an undated earlier version of that essay titled "Creek Indians Surviving in Alabama"; 115 pages of linguistic notes from Taskigitown, dated 1904-1905 and organized by categories; Creek and Yuchi songs; Creek and Yuchi Dance; 98 pages of Creek texts, including some interlineal translations, and related notes dated 1904-1905; and 35 pages of miscellaneous notes and letters on topics like dances, language, clothing, myths, handicrafts, and fieldwork. Also includes two botanical specimens--Coopti (Zamia floridana) used by Seminoles, 1941 and Ilex vomitoria Ait, used by Creeks--accompanied by letters to Speck from Richard Evans Schultes concerning Houma Botany; two letters from female students at the Haskell Institute in 1940 (Leona Giger writes of a Creek doll she is making and mentions the council house at Okmulgee, Oklahoma, while Ann Rolland offers to answer questions on Creek use of feathers); a letter from Morris Opler regarding Opler's work among the Creeks, as well as an essay by Opler about the organization, history, and social and political significance of Creek towns; a letter from Mario Gamio acknowledging the receipt of a Creek Indian pamphlet; and a letter from D'Arcy McNickle returning to Speck photographs of the Creek Indians of Atmore, Alabama to prevent them from getting lost and mentioning that his manuscript of the report is still being copied.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)