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Acoma
Language(s): English | Keres, Western
Date: 1915-1917, 1932-1941
Extent: 2 notebooks, 1 photograph, 1500 loose pages,
Description: The Acoma materials in the Elsie Clews Parsons papers consist of 1 photograph in item No. 26 of Subcollection I, Series II, "Notes, manuscripts, etc." and "No. 64. Acoma material"; and in Subcollection II, Series IV, "Research Notes" there are 2 Acoma field notebooks. Some of this material may be restricted due to cultural sensitivity or privacy concerns. Additional relevant material may appear in correspondence folders.
Collection: Elsie Clews Parsons papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.29)

Algonquin | Naskapi | Cree | Nipissing | Ojibwe | Rama | Chibcha | Maya | Haudenosaunee | Ktunaxa
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Iroquois, Kutenai
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1912-1941 and undated
Extent: 7 items
Description: Materials relating to both Algonquin and related Algonquian peoples, cultures, and languages. Includes Speck's notes on artifacts found near Lake Abitibi and in the Nipissing district; his Seven Islands field notes, including texts with interlinear translations, house data, names of animals, and a letter in French from Marie Louise Ambroise; abstracts of Speck's published works on the Rama-Chibcha of Nicaragua, River Desert Algonquins, Southern Ontario Indians, Maya, and others; sketches and comments on shoulder blade divination (scapulimancy), including notes on deer drives (including an undated note from A. Irving Hallowell) and the distribution of artifacts among Algonquin, Naskapi, and Mistassini peoples; two field notebooks containing (1) linguistic notes and informant and population data for Waswanipi, Abitibi, Temiskaming [Timiskaming], Nipissing, Algonquian and (2) Temiskaming ethnography, Wisiledjak (Wiskyjack) [Wisakedjak, a manitou] text (in English), Temagami ethnology and texts (in English), and one Iroquois legend; general information on birch-bark containers, including 37 photographs and 40 pages of notes relating to Algonquin, Cree, Ojibwe and Ktunaxa specimens, and a letter from Bella Weitzner; and a letter from A. G. Bailey sending Speck a copy of his book on Algonquians.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Blackfoot
Alternate forms: Siksika
Language(s): English | Blackfoot
Date: circa 1930s-1960s
Type:Text
Extent: 13 folders, 2 boxes
Description: The C. F. Voegelin Papers contain correspondence, card files, notes, notebooks, Vocabularies, and other linguistic and ethnographic materials relating to Blackfoot language and culture. These are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II of the Voegelin Papers. Materials in Subcollection I include 2 boxes of card files (mostly vocabulary) and 2 folders of document files in Series II. Card Files. Of particular interest in Folder #1 might be some notes on vocabulary and eight pages of an incomplete letter, apparently to Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, from someone based at the Blackfoot agency doing fieldwork under the auspices of Clark Wissler and working with Mr. Calfchild. The writer mentions societies, exogamy, kinship, reciprocity, bands, etc. Folder #2 contains child-focused material including typed texts (mostly sporadic comments) obtained from children, fragments of typed observations about children's interactions and language use, and a two-page list of 24 Blackfoot children, with their full names, ages, and sometimes notes about their fluency or references to texts and other works for which these individuals were apparently consulted. There is also a bundle of texts, mostly about Blackfoot societies and their origins, labeled "Old Bull (Shultz's Informant)" [Possibly a reference to James Willard Schultz (1859-1947)]. Continuing with Subcollection I, there is also 1 folder of undated linguistic notes in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A: Language Notes; a folder containing the typed transcript of a dialogue (between children at play) between Velma Bear Hat and Margaret Water Chief in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-B: Text; and 3 undated folders in Series VI. Notebooks (which were described in detail by Richard A. Rhodes, Department of Linguistics at the University of California-Berkeley, in 1988, and include vocabulary, stories, work on paradigms, vowel clusters, suffixes, numerals, kinship terms, and some ethnographic information in #3). Blackfoot materials in Subcollection II include correspondence with Oscar Lewis (regarding Blackfoot culture and linguistic classfication, particularly in relation to Kutenai, and including a paper Lewis sent and Voegelin's response) and Edward Sapir (mentioning work on Blackfoot, Algonquin and Wiyot) in Series I. Correspondence; and several folders in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian. The latter contain Blackfoot grammatical notes, Blackfoot prefixes, sketches of Blackfoot designs, and 8 notebooks. Blackfoot notebooks 1-7 contain stories (Blackfoot with interlinear English), Vocabularies, and names of speakers, and a separate unnumbered Blackfoot notebook contains ethnographic notes in English, though some Blackfoot terms and phrases are included.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Bororo
Date: 1950
Description: The Bororo materials in the Lounsbury Papers include linguistic materials in Series II. There are a significant number of audio recordings of narratives and chanting in Series VII. The correspondence, in Series I, includes Zarko Levak's work on the Bororo, Carl Schuster's photographs of Bororo jaguar skin robes.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Language(s): English | French | Haitian
Date: 1910s-1920s
Type:Text
Extent: 2 linear feet
Description: The Caribbean materials in the Elsie Clews Parsons papers consist predominantly of Afro-Caribbean folklore-related materials found in her field notebooks, and notes and works derived from them. See especially Subcollection I, Series II, for materials described especially as "Antilles" and Subcollection II, Series IV for notebooks from additional Caribbean nations, territories, and islands. Places noted in the source materials include Antigua, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Dominica, Grenada, Guadaloupe, Haiti, Martinique, Puerto Ricl, St. Croix, St. Kitts, St. Lucia, St. Thomas, and Trinidad. Additional relevant materials may be located in other series.
Collection: Elsie Clews Parsons papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.29)

Catawba | Yuchi | Chickasaw | Delaware | Choctaw | Cherokee | Tuscarora
Language(s): English | Catawba
Date: 1941 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 9 folders, 2 boxes
Description: Materials relating to James M. Crawford's interest in and study of the Catawba language. Items include card-sized paper slips, Catawba-English and English-Catawba, with pencilled notes in Series V. Card Files. There are also nine Catawba folders in Series IV-D. Research Notes & Notebooks--Other. One stand-alone undated folder contains mostly handwritten notes, including a comparison of Catawba to Yuchi, notes on references to Catawbas in Barton (1798), bibliographic sources on Catawba language and lingustics, and English-Catawba Vocabularies. Other indigenous languages and groups mentioned include Chickasaw, Delaware, Choctaw, Cherokee, and Tuscarora. The other eight folders each contain one of Raven Ioor McDavid's Catawba research notebooks, recorded in 1941 and given to Crawford in 1970 (see letter in McDavid correspondence in Series I. Correspondence). The notebooks in Folders 1-5 and 7 seem to be fairly straightforward linguistic material, focusing on narrative and interrogative statements and related vocabulary, verb tenses, pronouns, stems, etc. The notebook in Folder 6 is similar, but also contains notes on loose-page pages, including about 20 pages of Catawba geneaological information over multiple generations. The most prominent family names include Blue, Harris, Cantey, Brown, George, Sanders, and Ayers; other family names mentioned include Beck, Starnes, Cobb, Mush, Scott, Lee, White, Wheelock, Garci, Allen, Helam, Wiley, Gordon, Crawford, Gaudy, Blankenship, Millins, Watts, and Johnson. The notebook in Folder 8 focuses on stories--many about old women, animals, and interactions between female and animal characters--given first in English and then in Catawba with interlineal translation.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Cayuse | Nez Perce | Walowa | Walla Walla
Alternate forms: Liksiyu
Language(s): Cayuse | English | Nez Perce
Date: 1930
Type:Text
Extent: 3 notebooks; circa 800 slips
Description: The Cayuse materials in the ACLS collection consist of 3 notebooks and a lexical file in the "Cayuse" section of the finding aid. The notebooks (section Ps1a.1) contain texts with interlinear translations, as told to Morris Swadesh by Gilbert Minthorne, in the Niimi'ipuutímt language, including one text later published by Jarold Ramsey as "Fish Hawk's Raid Against the Sioux" (in the book "Coming To Light: Contemporary Translations of the Native Literatures of North America", ed. Brian Swann, 1994, Vintage Books, New York). The lexical files contains approximately 800 slips, with Cayuse forms with English equivalents, arranged alphabetically by Cayuse. One section, "Wai'letpu Ethnology," concerns use of Cayuse dialect by Walowa and Walla Walla.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Chehalis | Puyallup
Date: 1882, circa 1890; 1897, 1927-1936
Type:Text
Extent: 1800+ loose pages, 15 notebooks, circa 8000 slips
Description: The Chehalis materials in the ACLS collection consist of a large volume of material spread across numerous items in the "Chehalis" section of the finding aid. Major items of significance include Boas's Upper Chehalis field notebooks, recorded in 1927 near Oakville, Washington, containing vocabulary, paradigms, and texts with interlinear translations. Additional loose notes contains numerous stories, which partially derive from the field notebooks. Also noteworthy is an extensive lexical file of over 8,000 slips derived from Boas's field work, partially arranged and analyzed. Earlier materials relating to the Lower Chehalis dialect were recorded circa 1890 by Boas at Shoalwater Bay, as well as material copied from Myron Eells' 1880s field work and later corrected by Boas. Other smaller items, such as Aginsky's comparison of Upper Chehalis and Puyallup, consist primarily of linguistic analysis and some ethnographic information. The names of Chehalis speakers and consultants who made the work possible are not fully reflected in the cataloging, as many are typically not identified by Boas.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1828-1905; 1939-1975
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Lounsbury Papers is found primarily in several sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with a number of people on Cherokee language and culture. These correspondents include Harry Basehart, William Cook, William Fenton, John D. Gillespie, Mary Haas, Jack Kilpatrick, John Witthoft. In Series II, see the "Cherokee" section, which contains 3 boxes of research materials, including Lounsbury's field notes with numerous Cherokee speakers in Oklahoma, copies of original notes by other linguists, language instruction materials, and other related documents. The "General Iroquois" section contains some comparative materials as well, as may other sections to smaller degrees. Series VI contains multiple boxes of card files with Cherokee language data in the form of lexicons and texts in translation. In Series VII, there are several audio recordings, including a reading of Private John G. Burnett's eyewitness account of Cherokee removal, 1838-1839, and a significant number of recordings of songs and dances made by Will West Long and Della Owl, and Cherokee lessons by Robert Bushyhead and William Cook.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Apache, Chiricahua
Alternate forms: Apache, San Carlos
Date: 1930-1934; undated
Type:Text
Extent: 5 items
Description: Items relating to Hoijer's field work on the Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache dialects and as he prepared the resulting work for publication. These include several notebooks, five containing Chiricahua texts with interlinear English glosses and English translations and one containing Mescalero texts in phonemic transcription, with interlinear English glosses, and English translation and additional notes on facing page. There are also 23 pages of typescript taken from these notebooks, containing English translations only [not proofread] and several tales, which are listed in the guide to the Harry Hoijer Collection. Sam Kenoi is mentioned as the primary informant and translator. A Lipan-speaker, Crook-Neck, is also mentioned. There are also two items related to the San Carlos (Western Apache) dialect: David Mandelbaum's work with informant Lewis Russell in 1933 and 325 pages (undated) of phonetic texts (no English translations) with a note inside that reads "San Carlos or Chiricahua?"
Collection: Harry Hoijer Collection (Mss.497.3.H68)