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Beothuk
Language(s): English
Date: 1911-1922
Type:Text
Extent: 5 items
Description: Materials relating to Beothuk people, culture, and language. Includes correspondence from Franz Boas regarding a Beothuk report; from mining engineer Richard S. Dahl offering aid opening a Beothuk site; from James P. Howley concerning Speck's meeting with a Beothuk survivor, though Howley doubts the individual's authenticity (also includes a news clipping on Speck's discovery and a portion of Howley's book printing a Beothuk vocabulary with Speck pencil notes, 184-186); from William L. Messurier enclosing an article on Newfoundland extracted from "The Great Historical, Genealogical, and Poetical Dictionary" (London, 1701); and from Warren K. Moorehead discussing his New England archaeological field work and expressing doubt that Red Paint People of Maine were Beothuks based on the difference of art.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Catawba | Cherokee | Tutelo
Language(s): English | Catawba | Tutelo
Date: 1716; 1803; 1951-1997
Extent: 7 boxes
Description: The Catawba materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are primarily concentrated in Series II. These consist of copies of secondary sources such as an "Indian Vocabulary from Fort Christanna, 1716, Catawba census notes, 1830-1929, land claim agreements, and a dictionary of Place names in South Carolina. Original materials include hundreds of pages of Siebert's FIeld notes and a Catawba vocabulary / dictionary done with Wes Taukchiray.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Language(s): English
Date: 1940-1945
Extent: .1 linear feet
Description: This collection of memorabilia includes clippings, postcards (one from Marion H. Dickson), a brochure, and an arrow-head (a gift from the site to Murphy D. Smith, who deposited these materials at the APS). Images from a 1945 article in the Peoria Morning Star on the establishment of the new historical state park at the site include several striking photos of an excavated burial site (described as containing 230 skeletons of Mound-builders who died in a devastating epidemic), including one with of a school group at the burial site and another highlighting Dr. Don F. Dickson's method of leaving the dead in situ; a photo of the Dickson family farmstead (on which the Dickson mounds were located) before the establishment of the state park; and a photo of reconstructed pottery displayed in the museum. There is also a brochure about the site as a tourist and educational attraction with information on the history of the mounts, the Dickson Mound Museum, the work of the Dickson family (primarily Dr. Don F. Dickson, Marion H. Dickson, and Thomas M. Dickson), and the neighboring Payne Collection of artifacts. Several images of the excavated mass burial indicate that it was expected to be the main attraction to visitors, and it is called the "greatest display of stone age man in the world...230 skeletons left in original positions." Views of the burial site are also featured on the two postcards. The Dickson Mounds Museum is still a branch of the Illinois State Museum, and the Dickson Mounds are now understood to be a Mississippian cemetery complex associated with nearby village sites and a ceremonial center.
Collection: Dickson Mound (Lewistown, Ill.) Memorabilia (Mss.970.6.D56)

Kiowa | Ponca | Shawnee | Cheyenne | Menominee | Ho-Chunk
Language(s): English
Date: 1885; 1936-1981
Description: The General Linguistics material in the Lounsbury collection can be found in Series II. It includes a broad array works ranging from archeoastronomy to maps to lectures presented by Lounsbury on the history of linguistics. Many of the items are secondary sources.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Cherokee | Apache | Caddo | Calusa | Ojibwe | Choctaw | Delaware | Gwich'in | Haudenosaunee | Inuit | Karankawa | Mattaponi | Meskwaki | Muscogee | Navajo | Onondaga | Pueblo | Seminole | Seneca | Shawnee | Sioux | Slave | Timucua | Tuscarora | Tutelo | Wyandot
Alternate forms: Chippewa, Creek, Eskimo, Fox, Kuchin, Kutchin, Loucheux, Ojibwa, Ojibway, Mvskoke, Sauk, Huron, Wendat
Language(s): English
Date: 1939-1945; 1947-Circa 1961; 1951-1962;
Type:Text
Extent: Circa 350 volumes; 75 photographs; 75 newspaper clippings; 70 manuscripts
Description: Research on culture primarily related to Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Cherokee Nation, and United Keetowah Band.
Collection: Miscellaneous items pertaining to the American Indian (Mss.497.3.G41)

Seneca | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1886-1948
Extent: 25 items
Description: Materials relating to archaeological sites in Pennsylvania, many excavated through the Works Progress Administration. Includes site reports, site notes, photographs, photograph albums, maps, geological surveys, drawings, blueprints, news clippings, article and manuscript drafts, and other materials pertaining to sites throughout Pennsylvania. Sites mentioned include the 28th Street site and Wesleyville site (Erie County), the Guyasutha Mound (Allegheny County), Sugar Run sites, Phillips, Fort Hill, and Martin sites, Book Mound (Tuscarora Creek, Juniata County), Clemson's Mound (Susquehanna River, Dauphin County), Brock Village site (Muncy Creek Township), Nelson Mound, Williams Mound, the Sick site (South Towanda, Bradford County), Spartansburg Mound, McKees Rock Mound, and Crall Mound (Washington County). Drafted or completed manuscripts include Fisher's "Southwest Pennsylvania Materials," Cresson's "Archaeological survey of Somerset County, Pennsylvania," Gilmore's "Identification of faunal remains from southwestern Pennsylvania archaeological sites...and report...of animal remains," Schoff's "McFate site report on archaeological excavations," Stewart's "Skeletal remains from Fayette and Somerset counties, Pennsylvania," and Cadzow's "Archaeological explorations in western Pennsylvania," and Augustine and Butler's "Miscellaneous reports on Johnson, Miller, Jacobs, Hooks Run, Logan, Jimerson sites," a survey of northwestern Pennsylvania sites on Seneca-owned property in Warren County. Among the archaeological cultures and aspects mentioned are Adena, Hopewell (or Hopewellian), Woodlands culture, Monongahela aspect, Owasco, Point Peninsula aspect, and Algonquian.
Collection: United States. Work Projects Administration (Pa.) Reports, 1918-1948 (Mss.913.748.Un3)

Abenaki | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1669; 1678; 1725-1796; 1809-1884; 1900-1995
Extent: 12 linear feet; 3 hrs. (audio)
Description: The Penobscot materials in the Frank Siebert Papers are concentrated in Series III. Siebert collected census material, treaties and treaty minutes, placenames, with a strong representation of songs, stories, and linguistic materials. There are detailed notes about Indian claims in Maine and genealogical information. There are also educational materials for the teaching of the Penobscot language as well as a wealth of information on Penobscot linguistics. Series V, Siebert's notebooks, have extensive grammatical, phonetic, and vocabulary of the Penobscot language. Both Series III and V reflect Siebert's deep interest in the history of Maine and the Eastern Abenaki including archaeological, pre-history, and colonial era documents such as the Eliot Bible, which Siebert owned a rare copy in his library, which was sold at auction. Series VI and VII contain various drafts of essays on Penobscot culture, language, and history. Series XII contains approximately 3 hours of Penobscot language recordings, primarily from the 1930s and 1950s.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Seneca | Cayuga
Date: 1950-1995
Description: The Seneca materials in the Lounsbury Papers include his extensive work on kinship. Linguistic materials in Series II include work done by Karin Michelson, Morris Swadesh, and Wallace Chafe. Recordings in Series VII include songs from the Cold Spring Longhouse on the Allegany Indian reservation (NY). There are a large number of unidentified songs.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Shawnee
Language(s): English
Date: 1903-1948
Type:Text
Extent: 6 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's interest in Shawnee language, history, and culture. Includes an essay on Speck's visit to an excavation site at Fort Hill, Pennsylvania in July 1903 in which he identifies the site as Shawnee; a letter from Carl Voegelin and Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin transmitting lists of Shawnee dances to Speck; a letter from Wheeler-Voegelin concerning field data on Shawnee use of false faces; an undated report by Wheeler-Voegelin on general burial traits, including a brief account of field experiences and an 8-page outline of burial, funerary, and condolence procedure; a letter from Gladys Tantaquidgeon concerning Shawnee legends, asking about silk applique techniques, and enclosing news clippings; and 16 pages of Speck's miscellaneous Shawnee notes and correspondence, including two letters from Earl L. Poole (Reading Museum), together with a transcript of a 1747 letter of Conrad Weiser taken from American German Review: 12: 4, 18-19, April 1946, regarding meeting of Shawnees and Count Zinzendorf; a postal card from "C" on grasshopper war; a letter from Wheeler-Voegelin; a letter from War Eagle concerning Bread Dance; 1912 notes on Bread Dance and names given Speck; and notes on Shawnee clans.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)