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Innu | Naskapi | Atikamekw | Wabanaki | Lenape | Algonquin | Mashpee | Passamaquoddy | Wampanoag | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot | Maliseet | Muscogee | Menominee
Alternate forms: Menomini, Têtes-de-Boules, Têtes de Boules, Tete de Boule, Wolastoqiyik
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1920-1940
Description: The materials from Algonquian speaking cultures is quite extensive, though scattered, in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers. One of the strengths is Hallowell's very fine black and white portraits of indigenous peoples located in Series VI, Subseries F, which includes images of Mashpee, Mohegan, Montagnais, Naskapi, Womponowag, Nipissing, Atikamekw, Series V contains some generalized materials such "Algoquian Cross Cousin Marriage," Speck's studies of northern Algoquian hunting territories, and Algonquin mythology and history. The folders entitled "Eastern Woodlands" in box 26 contain more culturally specific materials such as a Penobscot vocabulary list, Innu and Naswkapi material culture, and Delaware religions and ceremonies, although many of these are quite brief. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a letter from John Swanton discussing bear ceremonialism in Muscogee culture. George Herzog's correspondence includes Penobscot and Maliseet scores of war dance songs. There is also a letter from Jeffrey Zelitch, dated 1969, describing traditional ceremonies on the Lakota Rosebud reservation just before the American Indian Movement begins. George Spindler's lettter to describes a Medicine Lodge ceremony among the Menomini.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Ahousaht | Cheklesahht | Ehattesaht | Hesquiaht | Hupacasath | Huu-ay-aht | Kyuquot | Mowachaht | Muchalaht | Nuu-chah-nulth | Tla-o-qui-aht | Toquaht | Tseshaht | Uchucklesaht | Ucluelet
Alternate forms: Aht, Clayoquot, Nootka, Nutka, Ohiaht, Opetchesaht, Tahkaht
Language(s): English | Nuu-chah-nulth
Date: 1895-1952 (bulk 1910-1914, 1931-1935)
Extent: 5600+ loose pages, 66,000+ slips, 29 notebooks
Description: The Nuu-chah-nulth materials in the ACLS collection consist of a large body of various materials primarily collected by Franz Boas, Edward Sapir, George Hunt, and Morris Swadesh. The majority of the content pertains to Hupacasath and Tseshaht people in the Alberni Valley area, with the exception of the Hunt materials, which were recorded in the Yuquot area, Mowachaht territory. All of these materials are found in the "Nootka" section of the finding aid, which contains a full, detailed listing. The Boas materials are consist of a lexicon of 1500+ word slips dating from the 1890s. Hunt's "Nootka Tales" consist of large body of traditional stories written in English and later typed up by Sapir with additional notes. Sapir's materials comprise the bulk of this section overall. See especially his extremely voluminous "Miscellaneous Nootka material," the final item in the "Nootka" section, for which a detailed table of contents is available upon request. This set of materials includes 24 field notebooks with extensive stories (some unpublished or untranslated) and ethnographic notes, as well of 80 folders of typed up notes from the notebooks, arranged into categories. It also includes some photographs, censuses of Nuu-chah-nulth "bands" (1920-1921), and 10 folders notes derived by Sapir (and Swadesh?) from "NW Coast Sources and Archives," pertaining to the region more broadly, including information on Coast Salish culture and history. Finally, Swadesh's materials include some additional ethnographic and linguistic field work, as well as extensive bodies of linguistic analysis of materials recorded by Sapir and himself.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Wintu | Klamath | Takelma | Maya | Patwin | Miwok
Date: 1888-1953
Description: The Wintu materials in the Harvey Pitkin Papers are extensive. Subcollection I, Series I, contains notes, notebooks, vocabularies, slip files, texts, manuscripts and phonetic tracings by Jeremiah Curtin in the late 19th century, Roland Dixon, and A.M. Halpern. Series I-B contains Pitkin's grammar slip files and vocabularies collected by Curtin. Series I-C includes Jaime de Angulo's manuscript on the Patwin language, S.A. Barrett's transcriptions and translations of speech and song recordings, Radin's "Grammatical Sketch" and Waterman's notes on Patwin phonetics. Series II-A is rich in materials collected by A.L. Krober. In Subcollection II, Pitkin's field notes are located in Series 2, Subseries 1. Subseries 2 includes Pitkin's extensive notes on his Wintu dictionary, grammar, texts, stories, and music. The manuscript of the dictionary is located in Subseries 3. There is an unpublished 416 page manuscript of stories written in both English and Wintu, songs, and transcriptions in Subseries 4. This section also includes copies of all the extant linguistic material with works by noted linguists such as Curtin, Albert Gatschet, Radin, Halpern, Morris Swadesh, Victor Golla, and J.P. Harrington. Series 6 is comprised of card file slips with comparative analyses by Pitkin of the four languages of the Wintun family.
Collection: Harvey Pitkin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.78)

Yuchi | Natchez | Muscogee | Osage | Navajo | Cayuga
Alternate forms: Creek, Mvskoke, Muskogee
Language(s): English | Muscogee | Yuchi
Date: 1904-1945
Type:Text
Extent: 5 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's interest in Yuchi language, history, and culture. Includes three letters from Roy H. Robinson to Speck concerning persuading Yuchis to answer questions, Cayuga earrings, a Navajo beaded necklace, Osage buffalo hide shield, etc.; a 13-page report titled "Yuchi Ethnography" on political organization, diseases, mythology, etc., based on a 1904 field trip; a folder on Yuchi and Creek dances with sheet music for songs to accompany dance, choreography, and a few vocabulary items with a folder on Yuchi and Creek songs along with 12 vocabulary slips; and 17 pages of Speck's miscellaneous Yuchi notes and correspondence, including one page concerning Yalewi, a Yuchi Indian; one card concerning peyote among Yuchi; a one-page list of names of informants, 1941; a letter from Erich von Hornbostel to Speck, concerning Yuchi songs; a letter from Ellen Allen, a Yuchi Indian, recalling Speck's visit in 1904 and Boas' visit and effort to do a Yuchi grammar with her; a letter from Carl F. Voegelin concerning Yuchi linguistics; letters from Charles Eli Sexton to the University of Pennsylvania Museum concerning Speck's Yuchi ethnography, a Yuchi informant, and connection of Natchez and Hopewell to Yuchi; and letters from Ann Rolland (Haskell Institute) concerning Yuchi museum specimens and relics of the past.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)