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Algonquian
Date: 1928-1991
Description: The Algonquian materials in the Siebert papers consists almost entirely of Algonquian language materials. Of interest are the materials on Proto-Algonquian in Series III and V. There are also numerous secondary sources in Series VII.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Cayuga | Seneca-Cayuga | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Language(s): English
Date: 1795, 1949, and undated
Extent: 3 folders
Description: The Cayuga materials in the Snyderman Papers include correspondence from Alexander General (Deskaheh) in Series I concerning "Cayuga Legends Explaining Conquest of Huronia," and a map of the Cayuga reservation from 1795 in Series II and a "Preliminary Report of the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe of Oklahoma" manuscript in Series IV.
Collection: George S. Snyderman Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.51)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1828-1905; 1939-1975
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Lounsbury Papers is found primarily in several sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with a number of people on Cherokee language and culture. These correspondents include Harry Basehart, William Cook, William Fenton, John D. Gillespie, Mary Haas, Jack Kilpatrick, John Witthoft. In Series II, see the "Cherokee" section, which contains 3 boxes of research materials, including Lounsbury's field notes with numerous Cherokee speakers in Oklahoma, copies of original notes by other linguists, language instruction materials, and other related documents. The "General Iroquois" section contains some comparative materials as well, as may other sections to smaller degrees. Series VI contains multiple boxes of card files with Cherokee language data in the form of lexicons and texts in translation. In Series VII, there are several audio recordings, including a reading of Private John G. Burnett's eyewitness account of Cherokee removal, 1838-1839, and a significant number of recordings of songs and dances made by Will West Long and Della Owl, and Cherokee lessons by Robert Bushyhead and William Cook.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Chumash
Date: 1959-1995
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: Beginning with fieldwork in around 1959-1960 with Marie de Soto at Santa Barbara, California, Bright continued to collected materials in Chumashan languages and villages throughout his life. A short field notebook can be found in Series 3 Subseries 2, along with a large topical folder on Chumash in Series 4. Correspondence on “Hispanisms” (Spanish borrowings into Native languages, Series 1, and the card file in Series 5) is also of note.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Lenape
Alternate forms: Delaware
Date: 1859-1860
Extent: 1 dictionary (820 p.); 8 maps
Description: A completed dictionary, based on various printed authorities (Zeisberger, Heckewelder, etc.). Contains a separate dictionary of place names organized by states. Maps of portions of Maryland, New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, North Carolina, and New York. Maps beyond Lenape territory may contain Powhatan, Susquehannock, Mohegan-Pequot, Quiripi-Unquachaog, Carolina Algonquian, and Pamlico place names.
Collection: English-Lenni Lenape and Lenni Lenape-English dictionary (Mss.497.33.H39)

Kiowa | Ponca | Shawnee | Cheyenne | Menominee | Ho-Chunk
Language(s): English
Date: 1885; 1936-1981
Description: The General Linguistics material in the Lounsbury collection can be found in Series II. It includes a broad array works ranging from archeoastronomy to maps to lectures presented by Lounsbury on the history of linguistics. Many of the items are secondary sources.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Hupa
Alternate forms: Hoopa, Na:tini-xwe
Language(s): English | Hupa
Date: 1901-1908, 1923, 1927
Extent: 40 notebooks, 80 loose pages, approximately 5,000 slips, and 11 folders
Description: The Hupa materials in the ACLS collection consist of a very large amount of linguistic material, located primarily in the "Hupa" section of the finding aid. There are two main sets of material. The earliest materials are two sets notebooks, numbering around 29 notebooks altogether, recorded by Goddard in 1901-1908 (items Na.3 and Na20a.2). These include texts with interlinear translations, historical accounts, vocabulary lists, grammatical notes, and ethnographic notes. Pome, Kato, Wailaki, Sinkyone, Tolowa, and Nongatl. There is also a large body of materials recorded by Sapir in the 1920s (items Na20a.4 and Na20a.5), consisting of 11 notebooks with texts, interlinear translation, and other linguistic notes; a lexical file containing 5000+ word slips, derived from the texts in the field notebooks; and 11 folders of typed-up ethnographic notes on myths, doctors and medicine, birth, puberty, marriage and death, omens, material culture, villages and houses, names, cosmography and geography; warfare. Images include a map of Humboldt County, California and pencil sketches of decorative patterns.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Hupa
Alternate forms: Na:tini-xwe
Language(s): Hupa | English
Date: undated, 2001-2004
Extent: 0.1 linear feet
Description: In addition to copies of several small publications on Hupa history, stories and songs (Series 2), Bright possessed a sketch map of Shastan languages distributed throughout California (Series 5), and corresponded with several researchers, most significantly Juliette Blevins, in which there is a lexicon of plants and animals (Series 1).
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Karuk
Alternate forms: Karok
Language(s): Karuk | English | Spanish
Date: 1949-2006
Extent: 4 linear feet
Description: From the age of 21 throughout his life, William Bright worked with Karuk speakers to document and revitalize their language, resulting in becoming the first white honorary member of the Karuk tribe. The most prominent materials at the American Philosophical Society as a result are wide-ranging audio recordings, from the 1950s until the 2000s (Series 6), especially with Violet Super. With Susan Gehr, he produced a Karuk language dictionary, correspondence with whom (Series 1) contains draft texts. With the Karuk he contributed considerably to the literature on Coyote in particular, original transcriptions of which are in notebooks in Series 3 Subseries 1, and further developments in Series 2. He also collected many small publications about Karuk, in the same series. Additionally of interest in Series 1 is correspondence about the suspected arson of a'tim'îin, the Karuk sacred site near Somes Bar, CA. Karuk materials can be found in every series.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Ch'ol | Lacandon | Maya | Tzeltal | Tzotzil
Alternate forms: Mayan
Date: 1924 and undated
Subject: Linguistics
Extent: 4 pages, 1 map
Description: The Maya materials in the ACLS collection consist of two items in the "Maya" section of the finding aid. The first is a brief word list (item M1a.1) recorded by Edward Sapir containing terms for numerals, natural objects, animals, parts of the body; obtained from the "Mortiniano tribe." (The specific Mayan language the list reflects is currently unidentified). The second item (AM1) is a linguistic map of Chiapas by Rudolf Schiller form 1924, which includes locations of the varieties Lacandon, Chol, Tzotzil, "Tsoke," "Tzendal" (Tzeltal?), and Chicomuceltec.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)