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Language(s): English | Spanish
Date: 1590-1976
Type:Text
Extent: 26 reels
Description: This collection includes field notes and reports, diaries of expeditions, texts, grammars, dictionaries of Indian languages, theses and research papers collected by members of the Department of Anthropology of the University of Chicago in connection with the Carnegie Institution of Washington Middle American Research Program as well as various Central American governmental agencies. A microfilm publication of the University of Chicago, 1946-1957. Table of contents. Originals at theUniversity of Chicago.
Collection: Manuscripts on Middle American Cultural Anthropology, 1590-1976 (Mss.Film.297)

Chumash
Date: 1959-1995
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: Beginning with fieldwork in around 1959-1960 with Marie de Soto at Santa Barbara, California, Bright continued to collected materials in Chumashan languages and villages throughout his life. A short field notebook can be found in Series 3 Subseries 2, along with a large topical folder on Chumash in Series 4. Correspondence on “Hispanisms” (Spanish borrowings into Native languages, Series 1, and the card file in Series 5) is also of note.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Karuk
Alternate forms: Karok
Language(s): Karuk | English | Spanish
Date: 1949-2006
Extent: 4 linear feet
Description: From the age of 21 throughout his life, William Bright worked with Karuk speakers to document and revitalize their language, resulting in becoming the first white honorary member of the Karuk tribe. The most prominent materials at the American Philosophical Society as a result are wide-ranging audio recordings, from the 1950s until the 2000s (Series 6), especially with Violet Super. With Susan Gehr, he produced a Karuk language dictionary, correspondence with whom (Series 1) contains draft texts. With the Karuk he contributed considerably to the literature on Coyote in particular, original transcriptions of which are in notebooks in Series 3 Subseries 1, and further developments in Series 2. He also collected many small publications about Karuk, in the same series. Additionally of interest in Series 1 is correspondence about the suspected arson of a'tim'îin, the Karuk sacred site near Somes Bar, CA. Karuk materials can be found in every series.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Kaqchikel | Ch'orti' | Maya | K'iche'
Alternate forms: Cakchiquel, Cakchikel, Kaqchiquel
Date: 1950s-1990s
Genre: Books | Maps | Stories
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: William Bright's Maya file consists mostly of copies of others' publications, in particular texts produced by the SIL and other publishers in Guatemala (Series 2). He also performed ethnopoetics analysis on Mayan texts in preparation for a taught course in 1985, and drew a map of the languages of Central America.
Collection: William O. Bright Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.142)

Mazatec
Alternate forms: Ha Shuta Enima, Mazateco
Date: 1922-1930, 1939-1940, 1942
Type:Text
Extent: 663 pages
Description: The Maztec materials in the ACLS collection consist of items found in multiple sections of the finding aid. In the "Mazatec" section, "Cuento mazateco" includes a grammatical sketch and text, "Cuento de venado y de sapos," with free translations and grammatical notes. "Informe de la investigacion Mazateca" gives a summary of phonetics; report of field-work plans; outline of ethnographic problems. In the "Mexico" section of the finding aid, McQuown's "Phonemic systems of various Indian languages of Mexico" includes some Mazatec vocabulary, as does "Comparative vocabularies of various Indian languages of Mexico." In the "Zapotec" section, "Estudio gramatical de las lenguas de la familia zapoteca" includes analysis of Mazatec, proposing its inclusion in the Zapotecan language family. The exact varieties of Mazatec are not identified.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Mixtec
Date: 1916; 1922; 1940
Type:Text
Extent: 41 pages, 300 cards
Description: The Mixtec materials in the ACLS collection consist mainly of three items in the "Mixtec" section of the finding aid. Radin's "Mixtec and Chinantec lexicon" is based on his own field work (found in the Paul Radin papers, listed separately in this guide) and other published work by Belmar. There is also an analysis of Mixtec tones and those of other neighboring language families by Jaime de Angulo, and a Spanish-Mixtec vocabulary assembled by McQuown and Swadesh. In the “Mexico” section of the finding aid, see “Comparative vocabularies of various Indian languages of Mexico,” which includes Mixtec vocabulary, and McQuown's “Phonemic systems of various Indian languages of Mexico,” which includes Mixtec information. In the “Zapotec” section of the finding aid, see de Angulo's “Estudio gramatical de las lenguas de la familia zapoteca,” which includes Mixtec information and ten ink sketches of maps showing linguistic groups, and de Angulo's “Zapotecan texts,” which includes Mixtec texts. Specific Mixtec languages identified above are based upon languages located in Radin's fieldwork.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Nahua
Alternate forms: Aztec
Date: 1605, 1649, 1970-1979
Type:Text
Extent: 1101 pages
Description: The Nahua materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 8 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed Campbell, Higgins, Knab, and Nutini.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

O'dam | Tepecano | Tohono O'odham | Akimel O'odham
Alternate forms: Papago, Pima, Tepehuan
Date: 1916-1967
Extent: 21 items; photographs
Description: Materials relating to John Alden Mason's interest in and research on Tepehuan language and culture. Northern Tepehuan is most prominently represented in this collection, though references to "Southern Tepehuan" indicate the presence of data on what are now distinguished as the Southeastern Tepehuan and Southwestern Tepehuan languages. Items focused on Northern Tepehuan include Mason's report from the Northern Tepehuan Linguistic Expedition, Baborigame, Chihuahua, Mexico (1951); his Northern Tepehuan linguistics file, containing circa 350 cards with words, phrases, and sentences with Spanish glosses and occasionally some Tepecano and Papago [Tohono O'odham] cognates; two 1936 notebooks on Northern Tepehuan linguistics with vocabulary and texts with Spanish glosses based on work with consultant Pedro Valencia; two 1951 notebooks on Northern Tepehuan linguistics with grammatical notes and texts from wire recordings; 20 pages of Northern Tepehuan texts with interlinear Spanish translation; 20 pages of texts relating to myths, official speeches, settling marital difficulties, etc. with interlinear Spanish 14 pages on Northern Tepehuan morphology concerned primarily with suffixes, taken from the files of Burton W. Bascom; 5 pages of Northern Tepehuan miscellaneous notes including verb conjugation labeled "Bascom" and a map; and two copies of "The Sacred Case" in Northern Tepehuan with English translation, attributed to Juan Dolores. There is one item focused on Southern Tepehuan, comprised of seven notebooks of Southern Tepehuan field notes containing grammatical notes, texts, and some transcriptions and translations of recordings at the American Philosophical Society (see also #3738). More general or comparative materials include Mason's "The Primitive Religions of Mexico" (1916), a paper read at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (Tepecano prayers to accompany the paper lacking); Mason's "Notes on the Linguistic and Cultural Affiliations of the Tepehuan and Tepecano," written for the Mexican Historical Congress, Zacatecas (1948); Mason's "Tepehuan of Northern Mexico" (1958), regarding observations on the culture which were made incidental to linguistic fieldwork (includes original and two copies with maps); lists of perdones Tepehuanes and notes on same; comparative lists from Southern and Northern dialects of Tepehuan, with English glosses and comments, by Burton W. Bascom and based on his work in 1943-1944 under the auspices of the Summer Institute of Linguistics; 14 pages of kinship terms in Southern Tepehuan, Northern Tepehuan, and Tepecano with English glosses; and a notebook containing a digest of Rinaldini's Tepehuane taken from the book in the Ayer Collection, Newberry Library. Correspondence includes letters from Burton W. Bascom regarding Northern Tepehuan with some mention of Tepecano, Pima [Akimel O'odham], Papago [Tohono O'odham], and Southern Tepehuan, and including a short paper by Bascom on the Northern Tepehuan possessive -ga, a Northern Tepehuan verb list for comparison with Mason's Tepecano list, and a discussion of noun plural formation with examples; Brete R. Hart regarding receipt of material on Utaztecan, work on alphabet for Southern Tepehuan, and a brief description of Fiesta for the Dead observed at Xoconoxtle, Durango, Mexico; Phil C. Weigland regarding acculturation, history, and relations with whites in San Sebastian and Azqueltan; and a report and correspondence from John Hobgood concerning events transpiring during a visit by John Hobgood and Carroll L. Riley to Santa Maria Ocotlan: their presentation of letters, request for permission to study the Tepehuan language and customs of the village, and interactions with the villagers. Hobgood mentions Agnes McClain Howard as well as Carroll L. Riley.
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

K'iche' | Maya
Alternate forms: Quiché
Language(s): English | Spanish | K'iche'
Date: 1969-1979
Extent: 10 linear feet
Description: The materials in the Ruben Reina papers relating to the Zunil region of Guatemala are found primarily in Series V of the collection. This series consists of notes and photocopies of documents relating to the Zunil people of Guatemala. In 1969, Ruben Reina hired a local Zunil man, Francisco Quiej, to collect material--legends and stories--from the monolingual elders of Zunil. Quiej recorded the interviews, then translated the accounts from their original Quiche in to Spanish. Via a local priest, Quiej sent the transcripts to Reina. The original recordings no longer exist, but the surviving transcripts serve as an important historical record of the beliefs and experiences of a native Central American people. Included are legends, religious texts, and interviews with and biographies of community members. Additional miscellaneous materials may be found to lesser degrees in Series VI, VII, VIII, XI, and XII.
Collection: Ruben E. Reina Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.67)