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Achumawi | Atsugewi
Language(s): Achumawi | Atsugewi | English
Date: 1907, 1931-1935
Type:Text
Extent: 615 pages
Description: The Achumawi materials in the ACLS collection are primarily located in the "Achumawi" section of the finding aid, with some also in the "Atsugewi" section (specifically item H1a.2, "Parallel Achumawi and Atsugewi texts"). They include a word list from the Pit River area; autobiographies of Willard Carmony, an Achumawi speaker, whose stories refers to being sent to Fort Bidwell Indian Boarding School; linguistic analysis of Achumawi's relationship to the Hokan language family; conversational texts in the Achumawi language; free English translations; and grammars. Also included are notes on dialectical differences between Atwamdzini, Hammawi, and Adzumawi.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Innu | Naskapi | Atikamekw | Wabanaki | Lenape | Algonquin | Mashpee | Passamaquoddy | Wampanoag | Mi'kmaq | Penobscot | Maliseet | Muscogee | Menominee
Alternate forms: Menomini, Têtes-de-Boules, Têtes de Boules, Tete de Boule
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Eastern
Date: 1920-1940
Description: The materials from Algonquian speaking cultures is quite extensive, though scattered, in the A. Irving Hallowell Papers. One of the strengths is Hallowell's very fine black and white portraits of indigenous peoples located in Series VI, Subseries F, which includes images of Mashpee, Mohegan, Montagnais, Naskapi, Womponowag, Nipissing, Atikamekw, Series V contains some generalized materials such "Algoquian Cross Cousin Marriage," Speck's studies of northern Algoquian hunting territories, and Algonquin mythology and history. The folders entitled "Eastern Woodlands" in box 26 contain more culturally specific materials such as a Penobscot vocabulary list, Innu and Naswkapi material culture, and Delaware religions and ceremonies, although many of these are quite brief. The correspondence, in Series I, includes a letter from John Swanton discussing bear ceremonialism in Muscogee culture. George Herzog's correspondence includes Penobscot and Maliseet scores of war dance songs. There is also a letter from Jeffrey Zelitch, dated 1969, describing traditional ceremonies on the Lakota Rosebud reservation just before the American Indian Movement begins. George Spindler's lettter to describes a Medicine Lodge ceremony among the Menomini.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Algonquian
Date: 1928-1991
Description: The Algonquian materials in the Siebert papers consists almost entirely of Algonquian language materials. Of interest are the materials on Proto-Algonquian in Series III and V. There are also numerous secondary sources in Series VII.
Collection: Frank Siebert Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.97)

Apache
Language(s): English | Apache
Date: 1938 and undated
Type:Text
Genre: Notes | Essays | Maps | Grammars
Extent: 4 folders
Description: Three items relating to Apache languages have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. All are in Subcollection II. They include Apache material in a folder labeled "Athabascan (Chipewyan)" as well as a separate "Apachean" folder in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries II. Na-Dene. The "Apachean" folder contains a typescript version of "The Word" by Gladys Reichard (with a note from Reichard), a draft typescript with annotation of "The Apachean Verb, Part I: Verb Structure and Pronomial Prefixes," by Harry Hoijer, and Voegelin's notes on Hoijer's articles on Apachean. Finally, there is a Chiricahua Apache story ("Child-of-the-Water Kills Four Monsters") as well as a Taos story about an Apache youth ("An Apache Boy Takes a Redhead Scalp") in the Southwestern Indian Tales section of Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II: American Indian Tales for Children. Apache languages (Chiricahua, Jicarilla, Mescalero, and Jano) are also represented on Harry Tschopik's map of "Indian Languages in New Mexico, A.D. 1600" (1938) in Subseries V: American Indian Languages. This item has been digitized and is available through the APS's Digital Library.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Aymara | Quechua
Language(s): English | Aymara | Spanish
Date: 1950-1972
Description: The Aymara materials in the Lounsbury Papers consist of comparative linguistics and studies of kinship in Series II. Of particular interest are the audio recordings in Series VII on the folklore of the Ayar Incas. The correspondence, in Series I, contains information of the geographic distribution of the language, Lounsbury's analysis of the language and its relationship to Quechua, Christian scriptures in Aymara, Morris Swadesh's work on genetic classification of Native American languages, and geographic distribution of Aymara population.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Blackfoot
Alternate forms: Siksika
Language(s): English | Blackfoot
Date: circa 1930s-1960s
Type:Text
Extent: 13 folders, 2 boxes
Description: The C. F. Voegelin Papers contain correspondence, card files, notes, notebooks, Vocabularies, and other linguistic and ethnographic materials relating to Blackfoot language and culture. These are located in both Subcollection I and Subcollection II of the Voegelin Papers. Materials in Subcollection I include 2 boxes of card files (mostly vocabulary) and 2 folders of document files in Series II. Card Files. Of particular interest in Folder #1 might be some notes on vocabulary and eight pages of an incomplete letter, apparently to Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, from someone based at the Blackfoot agency doing fieldwork under the auspices of Clark Wissler and working with Mr. Calfchild. The writer mentions societies, exogamy, kinship, reciprocity, bands, etc. Folder #2 contains child-focused material including typed texts (mostly sporadic comments) obtained from children, fragments of typed observations about children's interactions and language use, and a two-page list of 24 Blackfoot children, with their full names, ages, and sometimes notes about their fluency or references to texts and other works for which these individuals were apparently consulted. There is also a bundle of texts, mostly about Blackfoot societies and their origins, labeled "Old Bull (Shultz's Informant)" [Possibly a reference to James Willard Schultz (1859-1947)]. Continuing with Subcollection I, there is also 1 folder of undated linguistic notes in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A: Language Notes; a folder containing the typed transcript of a dialogue (between children at play) between Velma Bear Hat and Margaret Water Chief in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-B: Text; and 3 undated folders in Series VI. Notebooks (which were described in detail by Richard A. Rhodes, Department of Linguistics at the University of California-Berkeley, in 1988, and include vocabulary, stories, work on paradigms, vowel clusters, suffixes, numerals, kinship terms, and some ethnographic information in #3). Blackfoot materials in Subcollection II include correspondence with Oscar Lewis (regarding Blackfoot culture and linguistic classfication, particularly in relation to Kutenai, and including a paper Lewis sent and Voegelin's response) and Edward Sapir (mentioning work on Blackfoot, Algonquin and Wiyot) in Series I. Correspondence; and several folders in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries III. Macro-Algonquian. The latter contain Blackfoot grammatical notes, Blackfoot prefixes, sketches of Blackfoot designs, and 8 notebooks. Blackfoot notebooks 1-7 contain stories (Blackfoot with interlinear English), Vocabularies, and names of speakers, and a separate unnumbered Blackfoot notebook contains ethnographic notes in English, though some Blackfoot terms and phrases are included.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Kalinago | Kalina
Language(s): English | Carib
Date: circa 1948-1950
Type:Text
Extent: 19 folders
Description: Several items relating to Carib languages have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. They are all in Subcollection I. They include extensive correspondence with Douglas MacRae Taylor (regarding his fieldwork and written work on Carib languages, including some stories, translations, and other linguistic materials) in Series I. Correspondence; Voegelin's "Black Carib Morphology" and "Central American Carib II: Morphology of the Verb" (with Douglas MacRae Taylor) in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries III-B: Works Authored by Voegelin; ten files of Taylor's work (including notes, outlines, and essays) on Black Carib, Central American Carib, and Island Carib in Series IV. Works by Others; a Carib file with data on Black, Central American, and Island Carib in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-A: Language Notes; and four folders of unbound Carib texts in Series V. Research Notes, Subseries V-B: Texts.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Catawba | Yuchi | Chickasaw | Lenape | Choctaw | Cherokee | Tuscarora
Language(s): English | Catawba
Date: 1941 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 9 folders, 2 boxes
Description: Materials relating to James M. Crawford's interest in and study of the Catawba language. Items include card-sized paper slips, Catawba-English and English-Catawba, with pencilled notes in Series V. Card Files. There are also nine Catawba folders in Series IV-D. Research Notes and Notebooks--Other. One stand-alone undated folder contains mostly handwritten notes, including a comparison of Catawba to Yuchi, notes on references to Catawbas in Barton (1798), bibliographic sources on Catawba language and lingustics, and English-Catawba Vocabularies. Other indigenous languages and groups mentioned include Chickasaw, Delaware, Choctaw, Cherokee, and Tuscarora. The other eight folders each contain one of Raven Ioor McDavid's Catawba research notebooks, recorded in 1941 and given to Crawford in 1970 (see letter in McDavid correspondence in Series I. Correspondence). The notebooks in Folders 1-5 and 7 seem to be fairly straightforward linguistic material, focusing on narrative and interrogative statements and related vocabulary, verb tenses, pronouns, stems, etc. The notebook in Folder 6 is similar, but also contains notes on loose-page pages, including about 20 pages of Catawba geneaological information over multiple generations. The most prominent family names include Blue, Harris, Cantey, Brown, George, Sanders, and Ayers; other family names mentioned include Beck, Starnes, Cobb, Mush, Scott, Lee, White, Wheelock, Garci, Allen, Helam, Wiley, Gordon, Crawford, Gaudy, Blankenship, Millins, Watts, and Johnson. The notebook in Folder 8 focuses on stories--many about old women, animals, and interactions between female and animal characters--given first in English and then in Catawba with interlineal translation.
Collection: James M. Crawford Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.66)

Chehalis | Puyallup
Date: 1882, circa 1890; 1897, 1927-1936
Type:Text
Extent: 1800+ loose pages, 15 notebooks, circa 8000 slips
Description: The Chehalis materials in the ACLS collection consist of a large volume of material spread across numerous items in the "Chehalis" section of the finding aid. Major items of significance include Boas's Upper Chehalis field notebooks, recorded in 1927 near Oakville, Washington, containing vocabulary, paradigms, and texts with interlinear translations. Additional loose notes contains numerous stories, which partially derive from the field notebooks. Also noteworthy is an extensive lexical file of over 8,000 slips derived from Boas's field work, partially arranged and analyzed. Earlier materials relating to the Lower Chehalis dialect were recorded circa 1890 by Boas at Shoalwater Bay, as well as material copied from Myron Eells' 1880s field work and later corrected by Boas. Other smaller items, such as Aginsky's comparison of Upper Chehalis and Puyallup, consist primarily of linguistic analysis and some ethnographic information. The names of Chehalis speakers and consultants who made the work possible are not fully reflected in the cataloging, as many are typically not identified by Boas.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Cherokee
Language(s): English | Cherokee
Date: 1828-1905; 1939-1975
Description: The Cherokee materials in the Lounsbury Papers is found primarily in several sections of the collection. Series I contains correspondence with a number of people on Cherokee language and culture. These correspondents include Harry Basehart, William Cook, William Fenton, John D. Gillespie, Mary Haas, Jack Kilpatrick, John Witthoft. In Series II, see the "Cherokee" section, which contains 3 boxes of research materials, including Lounsbury's field notes with numerous Cherokee speakers in Oklahoma, copies of original notes by other linguists, language instruction materials, and other related documents. The "General Iroquois" section contains some comparative materials as well, as may other sections to smaller degrees. Series VI contains multiple boxes of card files with Cherokee language data in the form of lexicons and texts in translation. In Series VII, there are several audio recordings, including a reading of Private John G. Burnett's eyewitness account of Cherokee removal, 1838-1839, and a significant number of recordings of songs and dances made by Will West Long and Della Owl, and Cherokee lessons by Robert Bushyhead and William Cook.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)