Current Filters
Click filter to remove
Displaying 1 - 10 of 161
Abenaki | Innu | Penobscot | Maliseet | Haudenosaunee | Wabanaki | Atikamekw
Alternate forms: Abnaki, Tete de Boule
Date: 1914-1930
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Hallowell Papers are mostly located in Series V, Research Files, in folders labled "Abenaki" and Series VI, Photographs, Subseries E "St. Francis Abenaki Album." These include linguistic, ethnographic, ethnobotanical, ceremonial knowledge, information on political organization, and historical materials. Of particular interest are a sketch of Abenaki history from 1600-1930 accompanied by detailed notes from secondary sources on 17th century Abenaki history. The linguistic materials include an analysis of how the language changed after contact with Catholic missionaries, Abenaki vocabulary related to body parts, Abenaki phonetics, and religious, medical, and kinship terminology. The ethnobotanical materials include a manuscript labled "Identity of animals and plants," and information concerning herbal medicine and its practitioners. There is a wealth of ethnographic materials that include drawings of pipes, descriptions of games, baketry and birch bark maks. There is descriptions of Abenaki music and diagrams of dances, as well as detailed descriptions of hunting techniques. Some of the genealogical materials contains lists of community members names and descriptions of marriage. Interspered throughout the folders labled "Abenaki" in the Research Files are interlinear translations of stories such as "Man who could Find Lost Objects," "Woman and Bear Lover" and numerous other stories. The materials on hunting include topics such as the use of snow shoes, preparation of moose hide,and techniques and drawings of trapping. The collections contain important information designation hunting territories and family names. Four folders contain detailed informaiton on kinship terms. Two folders on Measurements and Genealogical data contain lists of names. The folders labled "Linguistics" in Series V contain scattered information about Abenaki grammar. In Series VI, of 160 photographs taken at St. Francis, Odanak in the Centre-du-Québec region. The Abenaki people in the photographs are identified, in most cases, and also include depictions of traditional dress, buildings, clothing, baskets, and a wide variety of material culture. The correspondence, in Series I, includes letters from Theophile Panadis; Gordon Day describing his collection of stories, recordings, vocabularies, and hunting territories. Henry Lorne Masta, one of Hallowell's Abenaki consultants, writes about culture and language. Additional correspondents may contain other Abenaki-related information.
Collection: Alfred Irving Hallowell Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.26)

Achumawi
Language(s): Achumawi | English | Wintu
Date: 1911-1915, 1936
Type:Text
Description: The Achumawi materials in the Harvey Pitkin Papers consist of miscellaneous materials in Series III, a political history of the tribe in III-A, and linguistic material collected by A.M. Halpern and J.P. Harrigton also in III-A
Collection: Harvey Pitkin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.78)

Alabama | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Koasati
Alternate forms: Alibamu, Coushatta
Date: 1934-1982
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas worked for a short period to document Alabama with several speakers on in the 1930s. The field notebook is in Series 2 Subseries ‘Multiple Languages' and includes comparisons with Koasati and Choctaw. Around 585 lexical items were obtained from this fieldwork, from which lexical slip files (Series 9) are derived. Haas also utilized John R. Swanton's dictionary of Alabama, and Alabama forms part of extensive Muskogean language comparisons, mostly in Series 2. There is also brief correspondence.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Algonquin | Anishinaabe | Naskapi | Cree | Nipissing | Ojibwe | Rama | Chibcha | Maya | Haudenosaunee | Ktunaxa
Alternate forms: Ojibwa, Iroquois, Kutenai
Language(s): English | French
Date: 1912-1941 and undated
Extent: 7 items
Description: Materials relating to both Algonquin and related Algonquian peoples, cultures, and languages. Includes Speck's notes on artifacts found near Lake Abitibi and in the Nipissing district; his Seven Islands field notes, including texts with interlinear translations, house data, names of animals, and a letter in French from Marie Louise Ambroise; abstracts of Speck's published works on the Rama-Chibcha of Nicaragua, River Desert Algonquins, Southern Ontario Indians, Maya, and others; sketches and comments on shoulder blade divination (scapulimancy), including notes on deer drives (including an undated note from A. Irving Hallowell) and the distribution of artifacts among Algonquin, Naskapi, and Mistassini peoples; two field notebooks containing (1) linguistic notes and informant and population data for Waswanipi, Abitibi, Temiskaming [Timiskaming], Nipissing, Algonquian and (2) Temiskaming ethnography, Wisiledjak (Wiskyjack) [Wisakedjak, a manitou] text (in English), Temagami ethnology and texts (in English), and one Iroquois legend; general information on birch-bark containers, including 37 photographs and 40 pages of notes relating to Algonquin, Cree, Ojibwe and Ktunaxa specimens, and a letter from Bella Weitzner; and a letter from A. G. Bailey sending Speck a copy of his book on Algonquians.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Arapaho
Alternate forms: Arapahoe
Language(s): Arapaho | English
Date: 1949-1952, 1962, 1967-1968, 1973-1974, 1976-1977, 1992, 1995-1996, 2000-2001
Type:Text
Extent: 814 pages
Description: The Arapaho materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 7 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Andrew Cowell, Orin T. Hatton, William Lewis Merrill, Willam K. Powers, Sue Roark-Calnek, Z. Salzmann, and William Weigel. These materials pertain to both Northern and Southern Arapaho. The materials by Cowell and Weigel relate to linguistic fieldwork for which there are accompnaying audio recordings, listed separately in this guide. Salzmann's material is also linguistic, containing a draft grammar of the language. The material by Hatton also relates to an extensive audio collection, "Ghost Dance-Era Songs of the Arapaho Crow Dance," also listed separately in this guide.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Biloxi
Language(s): Biloxi | Ofo | Tutelo | English | Spanish
Date: 1934-1994 (bulk: 1934, 1950s-1960s)
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 1.0 linear feet
Description: Haas' Biloxi file is mostly derived from John R. Swanton and James Owen Dorsey's published dictionaries, and often appears alongside the other Ohio Valley Siouan/Southeastern Siouan languages Tutelo and Ofo. The most notable original Biloxi material in the collection is an elicitation from Emma Jackson made in the 1930s, with comparisons to the lexica found in Swanton and Dorsey's published dictionaries, found in “Field Notebook: Koasati, Alabama, Biloxi” in Series 2: “Multiple Languages”. Haas also made many comparisons to other neighboring languages in Series 9, under many headings, observed possible Spanish loanwords (Series 2 Subseries "Tunica"), and alluded to Biloxi and neighbors in later correspondence.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Blackfoot
Alternate forms: Siksika
Language(s): Blackfoot | English
Date: 1960s-1970s
Subject: Linguistics | Games
Type:Text
Extent: 0.25 linear feet
Description: Haas' Blackfoot file was produced concurrently with PhD student Allan Taylor's dissertation, a grammar of the language, and Taylor appears to have produced much of it as a result of fieldwork. The file includes reprints with marginalia, phonology, a field notebook containing 15 pages of basic vocabulary and paradigms in Series 2 Subseries ‘Multiple Languages', and lexica with Proto-Algonquian comparisons, in Series 9.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Blackfoot
Alternate forms: Siksika
Language(s): Blackfoot | English
Date: 1967-1968, 1995, 2005, 2012-2015
Extent: 345 pages, 4 CDs
Description: The Blackfoot materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 6 items. Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under Armoskaite, Powers, Spriggs, Bliss, Kim, and Miyashita.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Swiss
Language(s): German | English | German, Walser
Date: 1917-1962
Extent: 2.5 linear feet
Description: Between around 1948 and 1950, Amelia Susman did fieldwork in Brienz, Switzerland, documenting the local variety of Highest Allemanic German as well as the social and economic organization of the village and surrounding areas. This is all contained within Series I. Of particular note are a reel-to-reel tape and some associated transcriptions, a set of 13 field notebooks, a lexical file, topically-arranged ethnographic notes, some correspondence with consultants (scattered throughout), and preparatory materials for several publications.
Collection: Amelia Susman Schultz Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.171)

Catawba | Yupik
Language(s): Catawba | English | Yupik, Central
Date: 1935-1939
Type:Text
Extent: Circa 2,300 slips, and 1 notebook
Description: The Catawba materials in the ACLS collection consist of three items found in the "Catawba" section of the finding aid. There is one notebook by Morris Swadesh (item X1.2, "Catawba field notes") containing texts, vocabularies, grammatical notes, and a Catawba "letter to Speck". This also includes 2 pages of unidentified "Alaskan Eskimo" mixed in (probably Unaaliq). There are two Catawba lexicons: one by Amelia Susman (item X1.1), containing approximatetly 1,000 slips and organized by stems, based upon Frank Speck's "Catawba Texts" (1934); and another (item X1.3, "Catawba vocabulary") by an unidentified compiler (possibly Frank Siebert), also based on Speck and unpublished materials.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)