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Abipon
Language(s): Spanish | Abipon
Date: 1967
Contributor: Najlis, Elena L.
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Genre: Essays
Extent: 41 pages
Description: "Descripcion del Abipon" regarding phonology, morphology, and syntax. Forwarded with letter to Carl F. Voegelin.
Collection: Miscellaneous Manuscripts Collection (Mss.Ms.Coll.200)

Amuzgo
Alternate forms: Amochco, Tzañcue
Language(s): Spanish | Amuzgo, Ipalapa
Date: 1923, 1939
Subject: Linguistics
Extent: 544 pages
Description: The Amuzgo materials in the ACLS collection consists of two items. In the “Mexico” section of the finding aid, see “Comparative vocabularies of various Indian languages of Mexico” (item AM5) which includes Amuzgo vocabulary. In the “Zapotec” section of the finding aid, see de Angulo's “Estudio gramatical de las lenguas de la familia zapoteca” (item Z.1) which includes Amuzgo information and ten ink sketches of maps showing linguistic groups. These materials may utilize data from Francisco Belmar's "Investigación sobre el idioma amuzgo" from 1901.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Kaqchikel | Maya
Alternate forms: Cakchiquel, Cakchikel, Kaqchiquel
Language(s): Kaqchikel | Spanish
Date: circa 1650
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume, 78 leaves
Description: A copy made in 1748 of Maldonado's "Ramilette" or anthology of 12 dialogues, together with a copy of an unknown "Doctrina Christiana" of 1556. Includes grammatical notes and vocabulary. Donor, Academia de Ciencias de Guatemala, through Mariano Gálvez, 1836.
Collection: Mayan Language Texts, 1553-1727 (Mss.497.43.V42)

Aztec
Language(s): English | Spanish
Date: 1925
Extent: 1 folder
Description: The Eugenics Record Office Records consist of 330.5 linear feet of materials relating to the ERO, founded in 1910 for the study of human heredity and as a repository for genetic data on human traits. The Eugenics Record Office Papers (1670-1964) contain trait schedules, newspaper clippings, manuscript essays, pedigree charts, article abstracts, reprints, magazine articles, bibliographies, photographs, hair samples, postcard pictures, card files, and some correspondence which document the projects of the Eugenics Record Office during the thirty-four years of its operation. Aztec materials include Folder "A:9772. Mexico" (1925), located in Series I. Trait Files, Box #65, which contains "Mexican Folkways," a booklet of brief essays such as "The Magic of Love Among the Aztecs" and "Coatlicue, An Aztec Goddess." Edited by Frances Toor with short offerings from Mario Gamio and several others. It was intended for the education of North American students of Spanish, and each essay appears in both English and Spanish on the advice of Franz Boas and others.
Collection: Eugenics Record Office Records (Mss.Ms.Coll.77)

Language(s): Spanish
Date: 1936
Type:Text
Extent: 20 pages
Description: The "Central America" section of the ACLS collection consists of one item, "Intrusion de los idiomas centroamericanos en el America del Sur" (item AS1). Written in Spanish, it is a comparative study of loans from Central American languages (no further detail in the metadata) into those of South America, with a vocabulary of 72 items. Prepared for publication, but unprinted. Other materials relating to specific Central American languages, such as Lenca and Xinca, are found under separate entries.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Maya
Language(s): English | Spanish
Date: 1926-1959
Extent: Circa 455 leaves; circa 635 pages; photographs
Description: The Central America materials, John Alden Mason Papers include correspondence regarding linguistic, archaeological, and ethnological work in Mexico and Guatemala; meetings; etc. Regarding archaeological work in Guatemala, Mexico, and Panama. Regarding Piedras Negras, Guatemala; Chichen Itza; archaeological work in Guatemala and Mexico. Regarding archaeological work in Guatemala, Mexico, and Texas. Regarding Pima; Yaqui; Piedras Negras, Guatemala; Maya glyphs and architecture; archaeological work in Guatemala, Mexico, and British Honduras. The bulk of the material is from 1933-1939 and concerns archaeological work at Piedras Negras, Guatemala. Some discussion of the Mayan calendar, the ruins at Yaxchilan, Mexico, and a 1953 expedition to the Caracol Ruins, Honduras. Scholarly materials: Article for [Lilly de Jongh] Osborne's handbook of Guatemala regarding the ruins of Piedras Negras, Guatemala. A paper entitled, "Los cuatro grandes filones linguisticos de Mexico y Centroamerica" for the International Congress of Americanists, Mexico, August 1939. A paper read at meeting of the American Anthropological Association, December 1938, on the genetic classification of Middle American languages. Bibliographies of books and a few manuscripts on Indians of Central America, Mexico, and South America; letter from Zelig Harris to Mason; Mason's reply. Paper sent to Mason to be read at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Discusses Hokan-Siouan Phylum, Tarascan, Macro-Otomanguean Phylum, Macro-Penutian Phylum, and Macro-Chibchan Phylum. Notes on genetic relationships and geographic distribution. Mostly from published sources. A compilation and juxtaposition of various opinions. A talk given before Sociedad de geografia e historia de Guatemala regarding the architecture of Piedras Negras. English original which was translated into Spanish for publication in Anales 15 (December 1938): pages 202-216. A paper "Middle American Linguistics, 1955" by Norman A. McQuown; draft of a paper by Mason discussing that of McQuown; a copy of Mason's paper as delivered at the meeting of the American Anthropological Association, November 17, 1955, Boston; a copy of Mason's paper as corrected for correspondence with Robert J. Weitlaner and Gordon R. Willey.
Collection: John Alden Mason Papers (Mss.B.M384)

Chatino
Contributor: Angulo, Jaime de
Subject: Linguistics
Type:Text
Extent: 574 pages
Description: The Chatino materials in the ACLS collection consist mainly of one item in the "Chatino" section of the finding aid. This document (item Z5.1) is Jamie de Angulo's "Brevisimas notas sobre el idioma Chatino para el uso de los textos," which mainly includes an analysis of verbs and some discussion of noun declension. The specific Chatino language discussed in the paper is not identified. Some Chatino vocabulary also appears in the "Mexico" section of the finding aid in "Comparative vocabularies of various Indian languages of Mexico" (item AM5) and in the "Zapotec" section of the finding aid in "Estudio gramatical de las lenguas de la familia zapoteca" (item Z.1) which includes ten ink sketches of maps showing linguistic groups.
Collection: ACLS Collection (American Council of Learned Societies Committee on Native American Languages, American Philosophical Society) (Mss.497.3.B63c)

Chitimacha | Chickasaw | Choctaw | Creek | Seminole | Apalachee | Alabama | Koasati | Natchez | Tunica | Atakapa
Alternate forms: Coushatta
Date: 1936, undated
Type:Text
Extent: 0.5 linear feet
Description: Mary Haas did not conduct her own fieldwork on Chitimacha, but amassed sizeable lexica from Morris Swadesh, mostly used for comparisons with Muskogean languages and linguistic isolates under the “Gulf” hypothesis. One especially large instance of comparison involving Chitimacha is an 1821-word long English-Natchez-Chitimacha word list, partially filled, in Series 2 Subseries Natchez. The majority of the comparative lexica are slip files, in Series 9. Besides this, of particular interest is sheet music of several Chitimacha songs, untitled, likely from Delphine Ducloux, in Series 2 Subseries Chitimacha. Haas also published an article on clans and kinship terminology with Natchez comparisons, notes and discussions of which are in Series 4 Subseries 3.
Collection: Mary R. Haas Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.94)

Kaqchikel | Maya
Alternate forms: Cakchiquel, Cakchikel, Kaqchiquel
Language(s): Kaqchikel | Latin | Spanish
Date: circa 1692
Type:Text
Extent: 1 volume, 110 leaves
Description: Consists of Catholic texts in the Kaqchikel language, including statement of doctrine, catechism, confessional, brief religious discourses. Also includes a grammar of the Kaqchikel language, which was translated into English by Daniel G. Brinton in APS Proceedings 21 (1884): 345. Donor, Academia de Ciencias de Guatemala, through Mariano Gálvez, 1836.
Collection: Mayan Language Texts, 1553-1727 (Mss.497.43.V42)

Language(s): Spanish
Date: 1599
Type:Text
Genre: Essays | Reports
Extent: circa 700 pages
Description: Spanish stateman Antonio Pérez served as a secretary of state under Philip II before a falling out over the killing of a political rival (and, perhaps, over their rivalry for the affections of Ana de Mendoza, Princess of Éboli) in the late 1570s. After years of imprisonment, Pérez spent the last decades of his life in exile in France and England. In this long essay, Pérez chronicles the history and operations of Spain and its colonies and seems to advise the monarch on the governance of different parts of the Spanish empire. It is possible that the essay was a gambit by Pérez to either regain the favor of Philip II or gain the favor of his successor. However, given that it is dated to one year after the death of Philip II and a full two decades after relations between the two began to sour, and that Pérez's writings have been cited as contributing factors in the creation of the "Black Legend" of Spanish colonialism surrounding Philip II, it is also possible that the essay was intended for English or French patrons or as anti-Philip propaganda. This item has a complicated history, however, and some scholars have suggested that the essay has been misattributed and is actually the work of Baltasar Alamos de Barrientos, a scholar and friend of Pérez who was imprisoned because of that friendship. In any case, it is unclear to what extent the author wrote (or wrote knowledgeably) about indigenous peoples of the Americas, or upon which groups he commented, but given his subject it is likely that he noted legal status, laws, treatment, and other aspects related to their status as subject peoples of Spain in the sixteenth century.
Collection: El conocimiento de las naciones, 1599 (Mss.320.P41)