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Abenaki | Wabanaki
Alternate forms: Abnaki
Language(s): English | Abenaki, Western
Date: 1956-1972
Description: The Abenaki materials in the Lounsbury Papers includes correspondence from Gordon Day on the eastern border between the Haudenosaunee and Abenaki, found in Series I under "Day, Gordon." A recording on Abenaki kinship terms can be found in Series VII.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)

Naskapi | Yurok
Language(s): English
Date: 1918-1945 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 10 items
Description: A variety of materials relating to Speck's study of diverse Algonquian peoples, cultures, and languages. Includes his "Remnants of the Eastern Indian Tribes," a brief discussion of location of New England Algonquians; his favorable review of John M. Cooper, "Snares, Deadfalls, and other Traps of Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapascans" [Printed, Speck (1939).]; a "Table of Double Curve Motif," charting techniques and variations of motifs of various Northwestern, Iroquoian, and central Algonquian peoples; a manuscript draft and additions of "Terms of relationship and the family territorial band among the Northeastern Algonquins," [Printed, Speck (1918).]; letters from Alanson Skinner challenging Speck's ethnic position of the Southeastern Algonquian on meaning of Eskimo-type artifacts found in Algonquian site in New York (State); materials from Eva L. Butler, including two pamphlets containing transcriptions of historical letters, principally from the Connecticut State Library--"Colonial Letters of our Ancestors" and "Letters of the Indians"--and "Botany and ethnozoology of the New England Indians," a bibliography of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century sources for ethnobotantical and ethnozoological references; letters from Edward Sapir concerning Speck (1918a), particularly Yurok comparisons, his excitement about reduction of language stocks, and possible typographical errors; and letters from Carl F. Voegelen concerning the usefulness of Speck's Naskapi material for comparative study of Algonquian languages and seeking an article on process by which Algonquian languages become extinct.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Apache
Language(s): English
Date: 1976, 2012-2015
Type:Text
Extent: 482 pages
Description: The Apache materials in the Phillips Fund collection consist of 2 items. (Materials specified as relating to particular Apache people, such Mescalero, Jicarilla, etc., can be found in separate entries in this guide.) Materials in this collection are listed alphabetically by last name of author. See materials listed under William Merrill and Margaret Pollak. The Merrill material is "An Investigation of Ethnographic and Archaelogical Specimens of Mescalbeans (Sophora secundiflora) in American Museums." The Pollak material is "An Ethnohistorical Study of Diabetes in an Urban American Indian Community," of which some of the anonymous interviewees are Apache.
Collection: Phillips Fund for Native American Research Collection (Mss.497.3.Am4)

Cherokee | Natchez
Language(s): English
Date: circa 1939-1975
Type:Text
Extent: 16 folders
Description: This collection documents the entire career of anthropologist and multi-facted intellectual Ashley Montagu from 1927 to 1999. The collection consists of 55.75 linear feet of material, organized into twelve series, plus oversize. Nearly half of the collection is Montagu's correspondence with colleagues, publishers, coauthors, and intellectuals from almost every discipline, as well as admirers from many different walks of life. There also several complete manuscripts of Montagu's work, including The Natural Superiority of Women, The Elephant Man, and The Anatomy of Swearing, as well as numerous journal and magazine articles authored by Montagu. The collection reflects the range of Montagu's intellectual interests and his influence across the spectrum of academic disciplines over his 60-year career. Montagu's writings on race, anthropology, and society, his correspondence with anthropologists and linguists like Franz Boas, Ruth Benedict, and C. F. Voegelin, and his class notes from anthropological coursework at Columbia University (including classes with Boas and Benedict), might yield material relating to Native Americans, but some specific items have also been identified. In the Correspondence series, there is an undated incoming item from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs. In the Works By series, there is an undated item labeled "The American Indian: The First Victim, Draft," 2 folders relating to North American archaeology ("The Earliest Account of the Association of Human Artifacts with Fossil Mammals in North America, Correspondence" [1951] and "The Earliest Account of the Association of Human Artifacts with Fossil Mammals in North America, Draft" [1944]), 2 folders with undated drafts about Natchez skeletal antomy ("The Natchez Innominate Bone, Draft" and "The Natchez Pelvis, Draft"), and 3 undated items in a folder labeled "Native Americans, Notes." In the Works By Others series, there is Rainer, John C., "Presentation of the American Indian," undated. In the Committees and Organizations series, there are 9 items dated to 1968 in "Association on American Indian Affairs" and 2 undated items in "Native Land Foundation." In the Printed Materials series, there is a copy of Hammel, Harold T., "Thermal and Metabolic Responses of the Alacaluf Indians to Moderate Cold Exposure" (1960), 13 items in a folder labeled "Indian Affairs" (1967-1972; 1975), and 9 items in "Native Americans" (1939-1967). Of particular interest might be materials relating to Sequoya and the invention of the Cherokee syllabary, including "Sequoya, Notes," "Sequoya, Correspondence," (1960-1961), and "Sequoya, Cherokee Indian Genius who Invented an Alphabet and so Brought Literacy to his People, Drafts," all in the Works By series.
Collection: Ashley Montagu papers, 1927-1999 (Mss.Ms.Coll.109)

Squamish
Alternate forms: Sḵwx̱wú7mesh
Language(s): English | Squamish
Date: 1976
Extent: 179 pages
Description: This paper, co-authored by Nancy J. Turner and Randall (Randy) T. Bouchard, gives the comparative linguistic transcriptions of the native plant names, the botanical identification, and the common English-language names of the plant species, as well as their utilization as food or in technology, medicine, or mythology. Includes photographs. See also the other volumes in the same series in the APS collections: Bouchard and Dorothy I. D. Kennedy's "Knowledge and usage of land mammals, birds, insects, reptiles, and amphibians by the Squamish Indian people of British Columbia" (1976) (Mss.970.6.K38.k); and Bouchard and Kennedy's "Utilization of fish, beach foods, and marine mammals by the Squamish Indian people of British Columbia" (1976) (Mss.970.6.K38). These publications were disseminated by the British Columbia Language Project.
Collection: Botany of the Squamish Indian people of British Columbia (Mss.970.6.B66)

Hupa | Wiyot | Karuk | Shasta | Achumawi | Atsugewi | Yana | Wintu | Maidu | Modoc | Tübatulabal | Yokuts
Alternate forms: Karok, Na:tini-xwe
Date: 1949-1952 and undated
Type:Text
Extent: 5 folders
Description: Several items relating to the indigenous peoples and languages of the region now known as California have been identified in the C. F. Voegelin Papers. This entry is intended as a catch-all for items Voegelin himself grouped under the general heading of "California." Researchers should also view the entries for specific culture groups and languages. The various subseries devoted to Hokan, Penutian, and Uto-Aztecan languages in Subcollection II, Series II. Research Notes might also be of interest. The following "California" items are all located in Subcollection II. They include a comparative vocabulary of California tribes (with words from from Hupa, Wiyot, Karuk, Shasta, Achumawi, Atsugewi, Konkow [Northwest Maidu], Yana, Wintu, Maidu, and Modoc) in Subcollection II, Series II. Research Notes, Subseries V. Hokan. There are two items in Series II. Research Notes, Subseries IX. Uto-Aztecan, except Hopi: a folder on "Baja California" containing notes excerpting "Tribes and Languages of Baja California" by William C. Massey, vol 5, pp. 272-307 (1949), and a folder containing comparative charts of . There are two stories--"Coyote and the Women Hunters" (Tübatulabal) and "Measuring Worm Rescues Two Boys" (Yokuts)--in the California Indian Tales category in Series III. Works by Voegelin, Subseries II: American Indian Tales for Children. Finally, there is a copy of Giuseppe Francescato's masters thesis "A Structural Comparison of the Californian Penutian" (1952) in Series IV. Works by Others.
Collection: C. F. Voegelin Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.68)

Calusa | Seminole | Catawba
Language(s): English
Date: 1923-1924
Type:Text
Extent: 1 folder
Description: This folder, Section IV(15J2a), "Seminole--Notes on Calusa," contains 9 items relating to the Calusa people of Florida. Materials include an account of the Seminoles and their mixed past; a discussion of the Siouan origin of South Carolina native Francisco de Chicora's terms [Francisco de Chicora was the baptismal name given to an indigenous man captured by Spaniards near the Pee Dee River in 1521. Swanton argued that the man was Catawba, which is a Siouan language.]; a letter from H. Knotts concerning Muscogee and letters from John R. Swanton concerning Speck's trip to Florida with Fewkes, Cusabo-Muskhogean-Siouan boundaries, and Speck as aid to Fewkes in locating Calusa remnants among the Seminoles.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Catawba | Houma | Pamunkey | Cheraw | Yuchi | Cherokee | Innu | Naskapi | Dakota | Wateree | Creek | Shawnee | Haudenosaunee | Tutelo | Powhatan
Alternate forms: Montagnais-Naskapi, Sioux, Iroquois
Language(s): English | Catawba
Date: 1914-1947
Type:Text
Extent: 21 folders
Description: Materials relating to Speck's study of Catawba history, language, and culture. This includes Speck's correspondence with indigenous consultants such as Red Thunder Cloud, Chief Sam Blue, and Leola Blue (Catawba) and Will West Long and Climbing Bear (Cherokee); correspondence with other anthropologists and linguists, such as John Reed Swanton, William N. Fenton, Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin, C.F. Voegelin, Morris Swadesh, A. I. Hallowell, Mary Haas, and others; genealogies of twentieth-century Catawba consultants; a Catawba bibliography; notes on topics including Catawba division of time, travel and expedition, food resources, racial status in the South, and notes, possibly for a lecture, titled "The Catawba-A Small Nation Deflated"; a University of Pennsylvania student's essay on Catawba tribal correspondence with J. Walter Fewkes about Speck's Catawba field trips; field notebooks devoted to ethnologic notes, vocabulary, texts, songs, and other linguistic and cultural data; and collections of notes devoted to Catawba language and texts, general ethnological notes, and miscellaneous notes. Some of the notes and notebooks and much of the correspondence mentions other indigenous groups as well.
Collection: Frank G. Speck Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.126)

Cherokee | Oneida | Onondaga | Cayuga | Seneca | Tuscarora | Haudenosaunee
Alternate forms: Iroquois
Date: 1946-1989
Extent: 1 linear foot
Description: The Cayuga materials in the Lounsbury Papers are located primarily in the "Cayuga" section of Series II, which contains extensive field notes and transcriptions made by both Lounsbury and Michael Foster of Cayuga stories and speeches given by Alexander General, Howard Skye, and Mrs. George Green, along with related discussions. See also Series VII, Audio Recordings, which includes some recordings featuring the Thanksgiving Address and the Condolence ceremony. See also correspondence in Series I, which includes Michael K. Foster's work on Cayuga Midwinter ceremonies, William Sturtevant's work with Oklahoma Seneca-Cayuga, and Marius Barbeau's materials on Cayuga and Tuscarora.
Collection: Floyd G. Lounsbury Papers (Mss.Ms.Coll.95)